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Game Birds and Ratites

The production of game birds and ratites has become very popular within the last 10-20 years. The knowledge base about these birds is rapidly expanding and will continue as the industries develop. Widely diverse practices are used that vary depending on the species of birds produced and the purpose for its production.

Emphasis at this web site is directed to the production of bobwhite quail, although information is also made available on other upland game birds and Ratites. Bobwhite quail are primarily produced for eventual slaughter (consumption) or release on shooting preserves, where they are eventually hunted for sport. The type of bird desired will dictate the type of management that is required. Although several publications address topics relating to habitat management, the primary emphasis of this site will be upon commercial production of the birds.

This site offers basic materials that answer many questions that producers initially ask. Additional information is available from industry associations, government agencies, and private web sites.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Other Information

  • Sanitation - Cleaning and Disinfectants addresses the concerns and procedures for maintaining a sanitary and low- disease environment in the hatchery and other poultry facilities.
  • Diseases of Poultry is a manual that discusses the many diseases in poultry and gamebird populations. Includes symptoms, causes, treatments and preventative measures.
  • Solutions for Poultry is a compilation of many treatments used by the poultry producer to treat conditions or improve the productive status of the flock.
  • Feeding Gamebirds is a discussion of nutritional concerns that the game bird producter should address when producing healthy birds. Includes diets formulated for various ages of quail.
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News

Choosing the right breed of chickens for a backyard flock is an important decision. From left, Tripp, Luna and Charlie Sanders examine chicks for sale March 8, 2017, in Starkville, Mississippi. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Kat Lawrence)
Filed Under: Poultry March 16, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Families willing to host a flock of feathered friends reap the benefits of fresh eggs delivered daily just outside the door.

What started several years ago as an underground "urban chicken" movement has become much more common and widely accepted. Today, raising backyard chickens has gained popularity nationwide, boosted by interest in locally grown foods that avoid the energy use and carbon emissions typically associated with transporting food.

Filed Under: Agriculture, Corn, Peanuts, Rice, Soybeans, Sweet Potatoes, Poultry December 15, 2016

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- The estimated $7.6 billion value of Mississippi agriculture increased by 1.8 percent in 2016, helping the industry retain its prominence in the state's overall economy.

Chicks and Forest
Filed Under: Agricultural Economics, Poultry, Forestry December 15, 2016

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Poultry remains Mississippi's top agricultural commodity with an estimated value of $2.9 billion, and it shows no signs of slowing down in 2017.

Forestry comes in a distant second with total farm-gate value of $1.4 billion, according to 2016 estimates.

Mississippi State University Extension Service economists just released their estimates for the state's agricultural commodity values in 2016. The top commodities remain poultry and forestry. Soybeans remain in the third spot, dropping 1.7 percent to just over $1 billion.

Chickens stand and move around when sprinklers gently spray water to cool them off. These immature birds were photographed Aug. 22, 2016, in a commercial poultry house at the MSU H.H. Leveck Animal Research Center in Starkville, Mississippi. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Kat Lawrence)
Filed Under: Poultry August 26, 2016

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- The same principle that cools down kids running through a lawn sprinkler on a hot summer day is being tested on chickens in Mississippi State University’s commercial poultry houses.

Tom Tabler, Extension poultry specialist with the MSU Extension Service, said keeping chickens cool in the summer is a life-or-death matter. Mississippi summer temperatures often exceed 90 degrees with humidity above 80 percent.

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Farmweek, Entire Show, August 28, 2015
Farmweek

Season 39 Show #08

Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 7:00pm

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