You are here

Insects-Pet Pests

Printer Friendly and PDF

News

The deer tick and the American dog tick, shown here, are two of the five most common tick species found in Mississippi. The state is home to about 19 tick species. (File photos by MSU Extension Service/Blake Layton)
June 9, 2017 - Filed Under: Insects-Human Pests, Insects-Pet Pests, Insects-Home Lawns

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- While hunting, working in the yard or garden, taking early morning walks or hikes, or just cruising around the property on all-terrain vehicles, people are likely to pick up ticks in some fashion.

Ticks are typically found in areas of dense vegetation and along game or human trails. Contrary to popular belief, they do not typically live in trees.

The Dermacentor tick species is among those that infect dogs with a neurotoxin that can paralyze them if left untreated. (Photo by Thinkstock.)
September 10, 2014 - Filed Under: Insects-Human Pests, Insects-Pet Pests

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Dog owners may be surprised to find out that certain ticks can paralyze their beloved pets.

These tick species carry a nerurotoxin that affects the mobility of animals. If the animal is not treated, their limbs may become paralyzed.

American dog ticks, such as this adult female, are one of 19 species of the disease-carrying parasite found in Mississippi. (Photo courtesy of Marina Denny)
July 25, 2014 - Filed Under: Environment, Insects-Human Pests, Insects-Pet Pests

Mississippi summers evoke thoughts of family vacations, rainy days and outdoor explorations. But with the heat and humidity come tiny critters that, if not discovered quickly, can ruin a fun day.

Nineteen species of ticks exist in Mississippi, but only a few are known to bite humans.

August 2, 2007 - Filed Under: Pets, Insects-Pet Pests

By Patti Drapala
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi State University veterinarians are urging pet owners to practice effective tick control on cats after the emergence of a fatal feline disease in the state.

Examinations of several domestic cats suffering unexplained deaths in the state and a recent cat patient that died at the MSU College of Veterinary Medicine's Animal Health Center revealed cytauxzoonosis, a parasitic blood infection that is a “death sentence.” 

April 27, 2006 - Filed Under: Pets, Insects-Pet Pests

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Dogs, cats and sometimes people are targets of fleas and ticks as warm weather brings out these annoying parasites.

Dr. Stanley Robertson, Extension veterinarian at Mississippi State University's College of Veterinary Medicine, said fleas and ticks are a problem from spring to early fall in Mississippi.

“These are external parasites that use animals and humans for a blood meal,” Robertson said. “Ticks and fleas can transmit diseases and animals, especially dogs, can become allergic to a protein in the flea's saliva.”

Contact Your County Office

Your Extension Experts

Extension Professor