You are here

Plant Diseases

Printer Friendly and PDF

Publications

Publication Number: P3076
Publication Number: P0483
Publication Number: P3022
Publication Number: F0448

News

Spores of the Macrophomina phaseolina pathogen can be seen as transparent ovals in this microscopic image taken from an infected corn plant. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/ Clarissa Balbalian)
January 13, 2017 - Filed Under: Ornamentals Diseases

CRYSTAL SPRINGS, Miss. -- When impatiens planted as part of a Mississippi State University variety trial died within two weeks, researchers acted quickly and described a pathogen never before seen in this flower.

"We were growing SunPatiens, which are hybrid impatiens immune to downy mildew. This disease has been a big problem for the industry," Broderick said. "The plants were doing really well, but in July they started to look like they were wilting. The stems were collapsing and dying, and in a two-week period, they went from looking relatively healthy to dead."

Mississippi State University plant pathologist Tom Allen (left) said fungicide-resistant frogeye leaf spot in soybeans has recently become a major problem. (Photo by MSU Extension/Kat Lawrence)  Producers rely on Mississippi State University recommendations to make management decisions related to kudzu bugs, such as these pictured (right), and other insect pests. (Photo by MSU Extension/Kevin Hudson)
October 30, 2015 - Filed Under: Insects-Crop Pests, Weed Control for Crops, Plant Diseases

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Farmers know how to handle ongoing threats posed by insects, diseases, and weeds, but new threats continue to surface that keep them on high alert and change the way they operate.

Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station researchers and MSU Extension Service specialists work to monitor the arrival of new crop threats, determine the best way to address the problem, and pass on those recommendations to producers.

Insect pests …

This crape myrtle branch is encrusted in the white felt of crape myrtle bark scale, an invasive insect that damages the once low-maintenance trees. (Photo by MSU Extension/Blake Layton)
September 9, 2015 - Filed Under: Plant Diseases, Trees

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Mississippi State University experts found an invasive insect that attacks crape myrtles on the coast this spring and now have spotted the pest in two cities on opposite ends of the state.

The insects are crape myrtle bark scale, or CMBS, and they were found March 15 in Ocean Springs in Jackson County. In August, the insects were detected at five locations in Olive Branch and Southaven in DeSoto County.

January 27, 2015 - Filed Under: About Extension, Plant Diseases

RAYMOND, Miss. -- Rebecca Melanson recently joined the Mississippi State University Extension Service as a plant pathologist.

She will focus on disease management issues in fruits, vegetables and nuts.

Frogeye leaf spot fungus, such as the specimen seen on this leaf, causes serious yield losses when not treated in soybeans. Mississippi State University is surveying to monitor and limit the increasing resistance of the fungus to the strobilurin class of fungicides commonly used for late-season disease management in soybean fields. (Photo by MAFES/Sead Sabanadzovic)
November 1, 2013 - Filed Under: Plant Diseases

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A statewide survey that Mississippi State University began this summer will continue next year as researchers look for a particular fungal disease that is developing resistance to chemical control.

In 2012, soybean fields in two Mississippi counties were found to have frogeye leaf spot fungi resistant to strobilurins, the class of fungicides commonly used for late-season disease management in soybeans.

Watch

Azalea Leaf Gall - Mississippi State University Extension Service
Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - 2:30pm

Contact Your County Office

Related PDFs

Your Extension Experts

Extension Professor
Extension Plant Pathologist, Disease management of ornamentals,peanut, turf,fruits, nematode program
Assistant Extension Professor
Diseases of fruits, nuts, and vegetables