You are here

Rice

Printer Friendly and PDF

Publications

Publication Number: P3016
Publication Number: IB0472
Publication Number: IB0466
Publication Number: IB0459

News

Nitrogen is applied to rice fields as urea, which is being sprayed by aerial application on this preflood field in Washington County, Mississippi, in June 2015. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Lee Atwill)
January 20, 2017 - Filed Under: Rice, Healthy Soils and Water

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- A new way of growing rice keeps costs down while maintaining yields, and Mississippi State University researchers say the method does not hinder application of the key fertilizer.

Alternate wetting and drying, or AWD, is a method for growing rice that allows fields to dry out before farmers flood them again. The conventional method of growing rice uses a continuous flood over the paddy.

December 15, 2016 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Corn, Peanuts, Rice, Soybeans, Sweet Potatoes, Poultry

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- The estimated $7.6 billion value of Mississippi agriculture increased by 1.8 percent in 2016, helping the industry retain its prominence in the state's overall economy.

December 6, 2016 - Filed Under: Rice

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Mississippi State University researchers have a plan to drastically change the way rice farmers grow their crop while cutting water use by one-third and maintaining yields.

The MSU Extension Service is encouraging Mississippi rice growers to consider using alternate wetting and drying -- or AWD -- management in their rice fields.

About 20 percent of Mississippi farmers use some form of AWD today, but Jason Krutz, Extension irrigation specialist and Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station researcher, wants that number to increase.

Mississippi State University field personnel begin the rice harvest on test plots at the Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville, Mississippi. (File photo by MSU Extension Service/Bobby Golden)
September 2, 2016 - Filed Under: Rice

STONEVILLE, Miss. -- Cue the song “Anticipation” for Mississippi’s rice growers because that title and chorus perfectly describe this point in the season.

“The majority of our rice fields are drained, and we are just waiting for conditions to stay dry long enough for harvests,” said Bobby Golden, Extension rice specialist based at the Mississippi State University Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville. “The weather has made us about 10 days later than normal. Harvest activity should increase rapidly in the first days of September as long as we stay dry.”

A Thad rice paddy is pictured at the Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville, Mississippi, on September 17, 2014. (Photo by MSU Delta Research and Extension Center/Ed Redoña)
June 15, 2016 - Filed Under: Rice

By Vanessa Beeson
Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Nearly half of all rice produced in the U.S. is exported, so Mississippi farmers need rice variety options to ensure strong foreign demand for their harvests.

In 2015, Mississippi growers harvested nearly 150,000 acres of rice across more than 250 farms. The crop had a production value of $132 million.

Watch

Farmweek, Entire Show, September 23, 2016
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 7:00pm
Farmweek, Entire Show, November 6, 2015
Thursday, November 5, 2015 - 6:00pm

Contact Your County Office

Your Extension Experts

Assoc Extension/Research Prof
RICE PRODUCTION SOIL FERTILITY AND NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT FOR RICE,SOYBEAN AND CORN