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General characteristics of Disinfectants

ALCOHOLS (Isopropyl or Ethyl Alcohol)

  1. Wide germicidal activity, non corrosive, but poses a fire hazard.
  2. Limited residual activity due to evaporation.
  3. Alcohols provide limited activity in the presence of organic matter.
  4. Not considered effective against bacterial or fungal spores.
  5. Excellent for disinfecting instruments or other small objects.
  6. Too expensive for general use in the hatchery.
  7. Must use as a 70-95% concentration for effectiveness.

HALOGENS (Iodines or hypochlorites)

  1. Provide wide germicidal activity but are corrosive.
  2. Limited activity when in the presence of organic matter.
  3. Poor residual activity, low toxicity, but may stain surfaces.
  4. Not effective as sporocidal agents.
  5. Effective at low concentrations for disinfecting clean, small objects.
  6. Low cost but requires frequent applications.

QUATERNARY AMMONIUM COMPOUNDS

  1. Limited germicidal range.
  2. Not sporocidal, effective against vegetative bacteria, fungi and viruses.
  3. Reduced efficiency in the presence of organic matter.
  4. Limited effectiveness in soaps, detergents and hard water salts.
  5. Non-irritating, non-corrosive and low toxicity.
  6. Residual activity is limited by the amount of recontamination.
  7. Good disinfectant for use on cleaned surfaces.
  8. Low cost.

PHENOLICS (Single or Multiple)

  1. Wide germicidal range, not sporocidal.
  2. Low toxicity and low corrosiveness.
  3. Very effective in the presence of organic matter.
  4. Good residual activity and deodorizer.
  5. Low to moderate cost.

COAL TAR DISTILLATES ( Cresol and Cresylic Acid) 

  1. Wide germicidal activity, not sporocidal.
  2. Corrosive and toxic at high concentrations.
  3. Excellent residual activity with heavy odor.
  4. Highly efficient in presence of organic matter.
  5. Not well suited for use near eggs or chicks due to noxious gases.
  6. Moderately expensive.

ALDEHYDES (Glutaraldehyde)

  1. Wide germicidal activity, sporocidal and fungicidal.
  2. Slight to moderate efficiency in presence of organic matter.
  3. Slight residual activity.
  4. Moderately toxic.
  5. Moderate cost.

OXIDIZING AGENTS (Hydrogen peroxide, Potassium Permanganate)

  1. Moderate to wide germicidal activity, not sporocidal.
  2. Rendered ineffective in the presence of organic matter.
  3. Moderately corrosive, limited toxicity.
  4. Poor to limited residual activity.
  5. More valuable as a cleansing and deodorizing agent.
  6. Moderate cost.
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Publications

Publication Number: P3140
Publication Number: P3131
Publication Number: P3133

News

Dressed in a pink T-shirt and blue jeans, broiler grower Teresa Dyess stands next to two wagon wheels in front of a barn on her family farm.
Filed Under: Women for Agriculture, Poultry October 20, 2017

In three days, Teresa Dyess shifted her business focus from produce to poultry.

The change began two years ago with an offhand remark from her husband, Joe Dyess.

 “He told a broiler grower in Wayne County we wouldn’t mind building pullet houses because we wanted to diversify our farm,” she said. “We didn’t think any more about it, and then the next day a poultry processor called and offered us a contract. A banker came the next day, and everything fell into place.”

Lanette Crocker, coordinator for the MSU Extension Service in Wayne County, said Teresa Dyess’ adaptability has helped her maintain success through the farm’s transition.

Hen flock inventories grew after the poultry industry recovered from the 2015 avian influenza outbreak, increasing the number of eggs on the market and driving down the price. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Kevin Hudson)
Filed Under: Poultry August 4, 2017

RAYMOND, Miss. -- Mississippi's poultry industry remains healthy with a strong demand for broilers and a positive outlook for the remainder of 2017.

Filed Under: Avian Flu March 30, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- All Mississippians who raise any species of poultry are being urged to follow strict biosecurity practices and review new requirements regarding sales and exhibitions.

Tom Tabler, poultry specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said that while avian influenza is not a threat to human health or food safety, an outbreak would endanger backyard flocks and the state’s nearly $3 billion commercial poultry industry.

Choosing the right breed of chickens for a backyard flock is an important decision. From left, Tripp, Luna and Charlie Sanders examine chicks for sale March 8, 2017, in Starkville, Mississippi. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Kat Lawrence)
Filed Under: Poultry March 16, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Families willing to host a flock of feathered friends reap the benefits of fresh eggs delivered daily just outside the door.

What started several years ago as an underground "urban chicken" movement has become much more common and widely accepted. Today, raising backyard chickens has gained popularity nationwide, boosted by interest in locally grown foods that avoid the energy use and carbon emissions typically associated with transporting food.

Watch

Farmweek, Entire Show, August 28, 2015
Farmweek

Season 39 Show #08

Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 7:00pm

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