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Pesticides

External parasites on poultry are a common problem in small flocks of birds. They often come in contact with the parasites or their eggs while foraging for food. The problems are less frequently encountered in commercial poultry flocks but treatments may also need implementing in these flocks. Several pesticides provide excellent protection against parasites. The product used and the method of administration is dependent on the parasite and type of housing conditions being used. A description of the most commonly encountered parasites can be found in the parasite section of Diseases of Poultry.

Listed below are several chemicals that have been approved for treating various poultry pests. Regardless of the chemical used in the poultry house, follow all precautions listed on the label to prevent the possibility of health risks to the poultry or humans.

Permethrin
5.7% EC Spray -- Dilute 7 tsp/gal or 1 qt/25 gal for .05% solution
-- Dilute 4 1/2 Tbs per gallon for .1% solution

10% EC Spray -- Dilute 4 tsp/gal or 1 qt/50 gal for .05% solution
-- Dilute 2.5 Tbs/gal or 1 qt/25 gal for .1% solution

11% EC Spray -- Dilute 3.5 tsp/gal or 1 pt/25 gal for .05% solution
-- Dilute 7 tsp/gal or 1 qt/25 gal for .1% solution

25% WP -- 1.5 tsp/gal or 1 pt/30 gal for .05% solution
-- 1 Tbs/gal or 1 pt/15 gal for .1% solution

The .1% solution is applied to ceilings, walls, and suspended objects using a pressurized or power sprayer. This residual spray may remain effective for several weeks unless removed by washing or rain.

The .05% solution can be applied directly to the birds at the rate of 1 gallon per 75 adult chickens. The solution applied to the birds is effective for mites only. Pay particular attention to the vent area when spraying to insure complete spray penetration and coverage.

.25% Dust -- Apply with shaker can at rate of 1 lb/100 birds. Dust to cover vent area. Recommended for treatment of mites only.

 

Carbaryl (Sevin)
50% WP -- Dilute 7 oz/5 gal for .5% solution.
80% WP -- Dilute 4 oz/5 gal for .5% solution.
43% EC Spray -- Dilute 7 oz/5 gal for .5% solution.

Apply to birds with a pressurized or power sprayer at the rate of 1 gallon per 75 adult hens. Carbaryl is a restricted chemical. Users must obtain a permit from the Agricultural Commissioner.

Spray the vent and fluff areas from beneath the bird. Provide mechanical agitation or stir mixture frequently. For litter operations, an evenly sprayed application can be made to the litter surface. Avoid contamination of feed and water. Treatment of infested birds only may be preferable to treating all birds in a flock. Northern Fowl Mites are tolerant to carbaryl in some poultry production areas.

Do not repeat treatment more often than every four weeks. Do not apply within seven days of slaughter.

5% Dust -- Apply with shaker can at rate of 1 lb/100 birds or dust bath box at rate of 5 lb/100 birds.

10% Dust -- Apply with shaker can at rate of .5 lb/100 birds or dust bath box at rate of 2.5 lb/100 birds. When using a dust box, the size should be 24"x36"x4".

 

Rabon
50% WP -- Dilute 2 lb/25 gal for .5% solution.
Spray vent and fluff areas from beneath the bird. Do not repeat more than once every 14 days. For individual bird treatment, apply 1 oz of .5% solution on each bird. For litter operations, apply spray evenly to litter surface. Northern Fowl Mite is tolerant to Rabon in some areas.

3% Dust Powder -- Dust bath box; 5 lb/100 birds.
Individual birds can be treated with a shaker can or hand duster by applying .5 oz/bird.

 

Ravap
23% Rabon -- Dilute .5 gal/25 gal or 5 oz/gal
5.3% Vapona for .6% solution
EC Spray
Apply to birds with a pressurized or power sprayer at the rate of 1 gallon per 75 adult hens.

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News

Hen flock inventories grew after the poultry industry recovered from the 2015 avian influenza outbreak, increasing the number of eggs on the market and driving down the price. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Kevin Hudson)
Filed Under: Poultry August 4, 2017

RAYMOND, Miss. -- Mississippi's poultry industry remains healthy with a strong demand for broilers and a positive outlook for the remainder of 2017.

Filed Under: Avian Flu March 30, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- All Mississippians who raise any species of poultry are being urged to follow strict biosecurity practices and review new requirements regarding sales and exhibitions.

Tom Tabler, poultry specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said that while avian influenza is not a threat to human health or food safety, an outbreak would endanger backyard flocks and the state’s nearly $3 billion commercial poultry industry.

Choosing the right breed of chickens for a backyard flock is an important decision. From left, Tripp, Luna and Charlie Sanders examine chicks for sale March 8, 2017, in Starkville, Mississippi. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Kat Lawrence)
Filed Under: Poultry March 16, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Families willing to host a flock of feathered friends reap the benefits of fresh eggs delivered daily just outside the door.

What started several years ago as an underground "urban chicken" movement has become much more common and widely accepted. Today, raising backyard chickens has gained popularity nationwide, boosted by interest in locally grown foods that avoid the energy use and carbon emissions typically associated with transporting food.

Filed Under: Agriculture, Corn, Peanuts, Rice, Soybeans, Sweet Potatoes, Poultry December 15, 2016

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- The estimated $7.6 billion value of Mississippi agriculture increased by 1.8 percent in 2016, helping the industry retain its prominence in the state's overall economy.

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Farmweek, Entire Show, August 28, 2015
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Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 7:00pm

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