• Four people and the words, Extension Matters.
A woman, leftmost, wearing a coral blouse and brown slacks, points and talks to two teens sitting in yellow chairs at a gray table.

When family and consumer sciences teacher Cassandra Tittle was approached about incorporating a wellness program into her health classes, Walk-A-Weigh was her first preference, because she knew first-hand how effective it could be.

A smiling woman with blonde hair, a red scarf, a denim shirt, and black pants rests her arm on the side of a “Welcome to the Mississippi Gulf” sign.

Kelly Griffin remembers when Harrison County began its recycling program.

“I was in elementary school when the county began curbside recycling,” she says. “My sister, brother, and I would argue every week about who was going to take the bin out to the road.”

A white sign with dark green lettering reads, “Monarch Waystation: This site provides milkweeds, nectar sources, and shelter needed to sustain monarch butterflies as they migrate through North America. Certified and registered by Monarch Watch as an official Monarch Waystation. Create, Conserve, & Protect Monarch Habitats.”

See what's new in Extension: a new monarch garden, a storytelling series will begin, the Garden Expo highlights Extension education, and Keep America Beautiful recognizes MSU Extension.

Red potatoes in a biodegradable basket are flanked on either side by green snap beans.

From the youngest to the oldest generations, thousands of people are visiting, shopping, and enjoying themselves at the Hernando Farmers’ Market, held Saturdays on the historic DeSoto County Courthouse lawn.

The market has more than just fresh produce. It connects the community by uniting the shoppers, producers, and artisans who come.

A female teen in a brown 4-H jacket, boots, and jeans squats beside a white cow moving toward its feeder.

Fun fact about Mississippi State University Extension Service 4-H’er Katelyn Shoemake: she is currently the only Native American in the state showing livestock.

A gray-haired man wearing overalls and glasses sits beside a raised salad table, and a black-haired woman stands behind him, wearing a blue T-shirt, with her hand on his shoulder.

As Jimmy Henry’s health began to decline, his wife, Shirley, wanted him to remain comfortable, safe, and happy. When the time came for Jimmy to enter a nursing home, Shirley was determined to stay right by his side, so she went with him.

Ten adults, including 3 women and 7 men, stand smiling in front of a Mississippi Farmers’ Market banner.

Cooperation. Commitment. Grassroots leadership. These shared values unite First South Farm Credit and the Mississippi State University Extension Service in their shared mission to serve Mississippi’s agricultural community. So when the opportunity arose to support the fledgling Thad Cochran Agricultural Leadership Program (TCALP), First South CEO and MSU agricultural economics graduate John Barnard (Class of 1981) jumped at the chance.

A smiling man with a "dedicated to dairy" logo on his shirt, stands in a pasture.

Pat Ard has tended his grandfather’s legacy since 1971, when he took the helm of the family farm from his father.
What started as a 211-acre Lincoln County cotton farm in 1894 is now a 1,200-acre dairy farm with more than 240 Holstein cows.

Members of the Covington County Tax Accessors office

When longtime deputy clerk Dannie J. Abercrombie threatened to quit after 33 years in the Covington County Tax Assessor/Collector’s office, she was frustrated that Mississippi was changing the vehicle registration and titling system in place since 1980.

The 39th annual Fall Flower & Garden Fest was held in late October 2017 at the Truck Crops Experiment Station in Crystal Springs. Approximately 5,000 visitors came to the largest home gardening and horticulture show in the Southeast.

A man holds onto fence as he looks at a field with stacked hay bales in it.

From a young age, Willie Clay understood that farm work was hard work. He got up early to milk the cows at his dad’s Monroe County farm. He lugged square hay bales, approximately 50 pounds per bale, through the fields to feed the cattle. He helped in the soybean, corn, and cotton fields.

Two elderly women display their healthy food choices.

McLeod is one of about 25 members of the group that formed 4 years ago. They meet at the Columbia center that is managed by the New Zion United Methodist Church.

A man and two girls stand in a barn with three horses.

Mississippi 4-H youth horse instructor Tom McBeath takes great pride in having taught two generations of students, and he is now recognized as one of the best in the country at what he does.

snow covers a fence and field in south Mississippi.

South Mississippi was blanketed with snow in early December 2017. Local agents with the Mississippi State University Extension Service worked with state residents to protect people, plants, and livestock in the cold temperatures. Extension experts are available in every Mississippi county to share advice on how to keep people, homes, animals, and plants safe, efficient, and productive, no matter what the weather brings.

A smiling woman in a blue shirt poses for the camera.

Paige Nicholson-Bergeron shares how the 4-H youth development program helped her prepare for both her title of Miss Rodeo America 2014 and her career.*

Three men and a dog stand in front of farm equipment.

Just because something happens by chance doesn’t mean it’s a bad idea.

After more than a decade of farming with traditional methods, Donald Gant started no-till farming in 1981 on some rented ground.

Two men shake hands in front of a Quality Steel sign.

They met in 2010 because of a tragic rough-terrain forklift fatality. Tredrick Johnson was the safety manager at the Cleveland branch of Quality Steel Corporation, and Billy Chandler was the local safety-compliance officer for the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration, better known as OSHA.

Members of The Marks Project in Quitman County hold a rendering of an improved community.

Find out what is new in Extension.

Four people stand on Main Street in Saltillo, MS.

When civic leaders in Saltillo made the move in 2016 to pursue Mississippi Main Street Association membership for their town, they wanted to see their business community become more connected to its residents.

A young man wearing a cap and checked shirt.

A tale as old as time: A boy’s older relative advises him to join 4-H. He refuses.

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About Extension Matters Magazine

Extension Matters magazine is the premier publication of the Mississippi State University Extension Service, telling our clients’ own stories of success through Extension education.

“We are excited to have our clients tell their stories, and we are thankful for the opportunity to interact with Mississippians through our local offices in all 82 counties across the state,” says Dr. Gary B. Jackson, director of Extension.

Extension Matters profiles people just like you, men and women who want to expand their knowledge base and learn about the latest innovations. Families, farmers, business owners, and government leaders are benefitting from the educational opportunities Extension agents and specialists are bringing to people and communities just like yours. Extension Matters shares our clients’ successes to show how you, too, can succeed through Extension.