• Four people and the words, Extension Matters.
A man with glasses standing behind a table with shells, teeth, and bones on it.

Extension connects landowner experts to identify fossils

The kids who dig in the dirt and rifle through the gravel do grow up, and many of them still keep their eyes on the ground whenever they’re outside. And, if they find an old bone or even a shell from an extinct oyster, they know they’ve found something special.

Headshot of a young black woman in business attire.

When her mother signed her up for 4-H in Lee County at the age of 10 with now-retired agents Sherry Smith and Beth Randall Youngblood, Shannon native Alivia Paden Roberts had no idea how influential the program would be in her life. Through participating in project areas such as leadership and public speaking, Roberts gained skills that led to her success. Roberts now works in Washington, D.C., as deputy White House liaison at the United States Department of Justice.

A smiling couple standing next to each other in a garden.

Growers address nutrition and criminal justice shortfalls

Growing vegetables and raising farm animals are demanding endeavors by themselves. Kevin and Teresa Springs are already succeeding at these activities, but their sights are set on combining them with their backgrounds in criminal justice to address greater societal challenges.

Two masked women with glasses and brown hair holding a brown bag.

Extension Brown Bags flying off shelves in DeSoto County

Mississippi State University Extension agents in DeSoto County are partnering with public librarians throughout the county to distribute Extension Brown Bags to members of the community. Extension has offered a range of educational programs at these libraries, so joining with them to expand the giveaways was a natural choice.

A young woman wearing safety goggles and a blue lab coat working in a lab.

Rural Medical & Science Scholars program provides insight, courage for careers

Zoe Fokakis is on her way to realizing her dream of becoming a physician scientist. That dream was partly fueled by her participation in the Rural Medical & Science Scholars program.

A catfish net rises in the foreground with 2 men standing on a boat in back.

Catfish production continues in Mississippi, and despite labor shortages slowing processing, pond inventories remain strong. Superior Catfish, based in Noxubee County, continues distributing Mississippi-born and bred catfish nationwide.

A woman sits behind a desktop computer at a desk talking on the phone.

New municipal clerk uses Extension training to earn promotion

From municipal elections to public-records requests, all official records for the city of Jackson are the responsibility of Angela Harris.

 

Four people stand behind a recently cut large red ribbon on a new bridge over a body of water.

Extension distributes 78,000 masks in Mississippi

When a federal agency made mass shipments of thousands of masks available nationally, the Extension health director in Washington, D.C., Dr. Roger Rennekamp, reached out to his longtime colleague Dr. David Buys, an associate professor with the Mississippi State University Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

A man and woman wearing masks hold each side of a banner that reads “2020 Winner $2,500.”

Full circle

As a farmer for more than 37 years, Dot Fleming understands the law of the harvest. So, when she had the opportunity to channel a $2,500 donation from the America’s Farmers Grow Communities program to the nonprofit of her choice, she immediately chose Calhoun County’s 4-H club. She says she wanted to give back to the program that nurtured her family and that she has supported for years.

A smiling teenage girl stands behind a table covered in ingredients for a recipe displayed on a phone screen she holds in front of her.

Mississippi fresh chef

4-H’er’s recipe appears in national cookbook

When Sydnee Thompson found out the National 4-H Council was putting together a cookbook, she decided to submit one of her family’s favorite recipes.

An older man and woman with a younger man stand smiling in front of a sign honoring Sadye Weir.

How one Extension agent influenced generations of community leadership

When Helen M. Taylor left the one-room schoolhouse to integrate a new school in the 1950s, she met someone who would change her life, and the lives of countless others, for decades.

Hummingbird.

Popular post

Hummingbird migration information reached more than 400,000 on Facebook, thanks to this post highlighting the featured Extension for Real Life blog post.

A man sits in a chair with his hands on his knees.

Investing in the future

Whether it’s in time, resources, hard work, or even patience, investment is at the center of showing livestock.

A woman wearing a black outfit smiles.

Extension serves Spanish-speaking population 

Sometimes, starting somewhere new is the best way to make a life change. In 2006, that’s exactly what Melania Roque did.

Side by side photos of two men, one older, smiling.

Four-generation farm family trusts MSU Extension

Four generations of Steeles have graduated from “our dear ol’ State.” While the university has certainly changed over the years, for the Steele family, one thing remains constant: they trust the land-grant institution’s research and outreach.

A woman stands between her husband and adult son.

Producer teaches about food and farming practices

Rowell Farms is doing much more than supplying cooks with fresh, local foods. The Heidelberg truck-crop farm is growing into an educational outlet for the Clarke and Jasper County communities it serves.

A smiling teenage girl standing next to a black backpack.

Teens learn emergency prep and leadership

Shay Collins and Kamrie Upchurch were not expecting to use the skills they gained in MyPI training just months after they learned them, but medical emergencies have never waited for anyone to be ready.

A woman stands behind two smiling children with her hands on their shoulders.

Teens discover "Keys to Community"

Introduce an adolescent to the local sheriff, tax assessor, and county clerk, and that young person may run for elected office someday. At least, that’s what one northwest Mississippi state representative is hoping.

A group of high school girls and boys wearing khaki bottoms and green 4-H blazers stand in a group in front of the state capitol building.

Leadership with Legislators

The State 4-H Council features the best and brightest 4-H’ers, elected by their peers to represent 4-H around Mississippi, as well as at the annual 4-H Legislative Day. 

An smiling elderly woman stands next to a window.

Extension program keeps Wiggins residents moving

People know they can maintain healthy, active lifestyles with regular movement, and women in Stone County have been following that advice for years. When Barbara O’Hara moved to Wiggins from the Gulf Coast, she wanted to continue participating in an exercise class. She was delighted to find an announcement for the Strong Bones, Strong Women program in the local newspaper.

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About Extension Matters Magazine

Extension Matters magazine is the premier publication of the Mississippi State University Extension Service, telling our clients’ own stories of success through Extension education.

“We are excited to have our clients tell their stories, and we are thankful for the opportunity to interact with Mississippians through our local offices in all 82 counties across the state,” says Dr. Gary B. Jackson, director of Extension.

Extension Matters profiles people just like you, men and women who want to expand their knowledge base and learn about the latest innovations. Families, farmers, business owners, and government leaders are benefitting from the educational opportunities Extension agents and specialists are bringing to people and communities just like yours. Extension Matters shares our clients’ successes to show how you, too, can succeed through Extension.