You are here

Chick removal from hatchery

The time period that is normally recommended between hatching and removal of chicks from the hatching unit or incubator is about 1 to 24 hours.

The earliest elapsed time before removal is usually about 1 hour. The ideal chick must be able to walk well and has dried, fluffy down. If the chick is still wet, it should stay in the hatcher even if all other chicks are ready for removal. A wet chick becomes quickly chilled and often dies soon after removal.

If all eggs do not hatch within 24 hours after the first hatchling emerges, open the hatching unit and remove all dry chicks. Leave wet chicks until they are dry and strong. It is best to remove chicks at 18 to 24 hours intervals after the first chick hatches. If chicks are still hatching when the hatcher is opened, it is important to quickly remove dry chicks and close the hatcher before the humidity drops too low.

The primary reason for not allowing the chicks to stay in the hatcher for longer periods is excess dehydration of the chicks. The chicks have enough food reserves to provide their bodies with nourishment for 3 days. They do not have additional moisture reserves and can become dehydrated if left in the hatcher too long. A dehydrated chick is identified by looking at the scaly portion of the legs (shanks). If the shanks are smooth and rounded, the chick is normal and does not immediately need water. If the shanks are angular and show sharp angles on the front and backs, they are dehydrated and in a stage of stress. Be sure that plenty of cool, fresh drinking water is available in the brooding area.

Additional information on proper incubation practices can be found in Hatching Quality Chicks and Hatchery Management Guide.

Printer Friendly and PDF

News

A woman holds a brown and white chicken while a young girl looks on.
Filed Under: Poultry June 1, 2018

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- More than a million backyard chicken flocks provide Americans with eggs, meat or companionship, a trend Mississippians embrace, but hobby farmers must learn proper care to keep them healthy.

A close up of white eggs stacked in a bowl with other white eggs.
Filed Under: Poultry April 13, 2018

RAYMOND, Miss. -- With low feed prices and healthy demand for broilers and eggs, the Mississippi poultry industry is poised for another productive year.

An illustration depicts a large yellow chick with a graph showing the number of Salmonella outbreaks since 2000 and includes text instructions to wash hands after handling backyard poultry.
Filed Under: Youth Poultry, Agriculture, Livestock, Poultry March 30, 2018

Baby chickens are so cute and cuddly that few people can resist holding them. Unfortunately, as public interest in raising backyard birds has grown so has the number of Salmonella outbreaks in the U.S. (Photo by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

More than 20 newly hatched chickens covered in yellow down bask under warming lamps in a large black tub.
Filed Under: Youth Poultry, Livestock, Poultry March 27, 2018

Some people can’t resist the latest spring fashions. Others plant flowers in profusion.
Then there are those, like me, who are highly susceptible to the cheerful chirping of newly hatched chicks. (Photo by Kat Lawrence)

Filed Under: Commercial Fruit and Nuts, Green Industry, Organic Fruit and Vegetables, Other Vegetables, Corn, Cotton, Nuts, Peanuts, Soybeans, Equine, Goats and Sheep, Poultry, Lawn and Garden, Forestry, Seafood Economics, Seafood Harvesting and Processing March 7, 2018

ELLISVILLE, Miss. -- Mississippi State University representatives met with agricultural clients in Ellisville recently to discuss research and education needs for 2018. More than 115 individuals attended this year's event.

Watch

Farmweek, Entire Show, August 28, 2015
Farmweek

Season 39 Show #08

Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 7:00pm

Contact Your County Office

Your Extension Experts

Extension Associate III
Extension Professor
Extension Instructor