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Crop Report

Mississippi's timber industry may see increasing demand for Southern pine lumber as new home construction rates continue to rise. This pine was growing in Monroe County on Sept. 12, 2013. (File photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
April 17, 2014 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Forages

JACKSON – Hay producers need warmer temperatures and drier ground to catch up with production this spring.

“Everything is shaping up to be late with all the wet, cool weather we’ve had,” said Charlie Bush, Mississippi State University Extension Service agent in Simpson County. Simpson was one of the counties where some fields flooded after most areas in central Mississippi received between three and 10 inches of rain between April 5 and 7.

Mississippi's timber industry may see increasing demand for Southern pine lumber as new home construction rates continue to rise. This pine was growing in Monroe County on Sept. 12, 2013. (File photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
April 11, 2014 - Filed Under: Forest Economics, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Markets for Mississippi’s sawtimber and pulpwood are bouncing back from the economic recession, but the industry is not improving across the board.

“Slowly but surely, markets for sawtimber are beginning to grow again after the sharp declines seen after the collapse of the U.S. housing market and the ensuing recession,” said James Henderson, associate Extension professor of forestry at Mississippi State University. “But the closing of the International Paper mill in Courtland, Ala. will have an impact on north Mississippi’s pulpwood markets.”

Mississippi State University Extension Service cotton specialist Darrin Dodds examines on April 3, 2014, cotton seeds he will use in seed treatment research trials on the R.R. Foil Plant Science Research Center in Starkville, Miss. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
April 4, 2014 - Filed Under: Agricultural Economics, Crops

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Memories of last year’s bumper crops have Mississippi farmers eager for fields to dry out so they can plant the 2014 crop.

Market potential remains the first consideration when making crop choices.

“Prices are driving growers’ planting decisions,” said Brian Williams, an agricultural economist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service. “Mississippi corn is trading about $2.50 per bushel lower than a year ago, while Mississippi soybean prices are slightly higher than a year ago.”

Erick Larson inspects wheat on March 25, 2014, that has broken winter dormancy and is actively growing on Mississippi State University's R.R. Foil Plant Science Research Center. The Extension agronomist said the cold winter slowed wheat maturity, allowing it to better withstand the early-spring freeze. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
March 28, 2014 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Wheat

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- This year’s cold winter slowed wheat growth so the late-March freeze across much of Mississippi probably did not cause major damage to the state’s wheat crop.

Erick Larson, grain crops agronomist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said most wheat across the state had not reached a growth stage where it would have been sensitive to freezing temperatures when the cold returned on March 26.

Christmas tree farmer Bob Shearer, of Purvis, uses a shearing machine to trim trees on his farm. Producers anticipate a 7 percent increase in Christmas tree sales this year. (Submitted photo)
November 8, 2013 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

By Kaitlyn Byrne
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Thanks to impressive live Christmas tree sales last year, customers seeking the best Christmas trees may need to buy early this year.

Mississippi producers are expected to plant more than 400,000 acres of wheat this fall. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
November 1, 2013 - Filed Under: Wheat

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Fall planting of the state’s winter wheat crop is on schedule, and early-season growth looks good in fields planted so far.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Oct. 27 report, 28 percent of the state’s expected wheat crop had been planted. Unlike spring, when all row crops were well behind schedule, this estimate puts wheat exactly on track with the five-year average.

Even after a late start, a favorable growing season allowed for a timely harvest of Mississippi's rice, such as this grown at the Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville. The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports the crop was 96 percent harvested by Oct. 20, 2013. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Keri Collins Lewis)
October 25, 2013 - Filed Under: Rice

MISSISSIPPI STATE – After a late start for the planting season raised fears that a hot August could damage the crop, Mississippi’s rice has yielded a high-quality harvest.

The Oct. 20 U.S. Department of Agriculture crop progress and condition report indicated the state’s rice crop was 96 percent harvested. The crop’s quality was rated as 50 percent good and 25 percent excellent.

Tim Walker, rice agronomist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said grain quality is based on several factors, including translucence.

Country Pumpkins in Caledonia, Miss., has more than 80 varieties of pumpkins, squash and gourds after one of the best growing seasons in decades. The Lowndes County farm is one of a growing number of agritourism sites in the state. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Tim Allison)
October 18, 2013 - Filed Under: Pumpkins

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi’s pumpkins have experienced something of a holiday miracle with one of their best seasons ever.

David Nagel, horticulturist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said 2013 has been the best year for pumpkins since he started working in the state about 25 years ago. Mississippi growers are producing more and larger pumpkins than their competitors in states to the north.

Greg Norton uses an inverter to dig peanuts out of the ground Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, at his farm in Monroe County, Miss. Cool, wet mornings are slowing peanut harvests across the state. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
October 11, 2013 - Filed Under: Agricultural Economics, Peanuts

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The cool, damp nights that are making it feel like fall in Mississippi are slowing peanut harvests way down across much of the state.

Mississippi’s peanut crop was 28 percent harvested as of the last U.S. Department of Agriculture Crop Progress and Condition Report released Sept. 30. Because of the federal government shutdown, no new figures have been released in almost two weeks. At the end of September, 48 percent of the crop was listed in good condition, with 13 percent excellent and 39 percent fair.

Grain sorghum in Mississippi, such as this planted at the Mississippi State University R.R. Foil Plant Science Research Center, was 50 percent harvested by Sept. 29, 2013. The crop was about 82 percent harvested this time last year. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
October 4, 2013 - Filed Under: Grains

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi’s farmers showed their ability to adapt when wet spring weather forced many of them to change their planting intentions from corn, cotton and soybeans to late-planted grain sorghum.

Benny Graves, executive director of the Mississippi Sweet Potato Council and Matthew Knight, a grower in Webster County, inspect harvested sweet potatoes on Sept. 4, 2013. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
September 27, 2013 - Filed Under: Sweet Potatoes

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- In spite of recent rains, the state’s sweet potato growers have a lot to be excited about this harvest season.

“Growers set the majority of the crop back in late May and June under ideal conditions,” said Stephen Meyers, sweet potato specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service. “We had good root set, which means the number of roots per plant has been good.”

September 20, 2013 - Filed Under: Swine

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi swine producers are discovering the only constant in their industry is change.

John Michael Riley, agricultural economist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said a variety of challenges have kept the state’s swine producers adjusting their strategies to avoid financial losses in recent decades. Just when producers adjust to overcome one hurdle, another one develops to drive prices down and the cost of production up.

Holstein dairy cows in Mississippi State University's barns near Starkville, Miss., on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, are cooled with sprinklers and fans to reduce the effects of heat stress on their milk production. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
September 13, 2013 - Filed Under: Dairy

MISSISSIPPI STATE – 2013 continues the trend of high feed prices, making it very challenging for Mississippi dairy farms to make a profit.

Lamar Adams, dairy specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said prices farmers are paid for their milk have been higher than in recent years, but feed prices have remained much higher than ever before.

Erick Larson, corn specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, examines hybrid plants in test plots located on the R.R. Foil Plant Science Research Center on Sept. 4, 2013. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
September 6, 2013 - Filed Under: Corn

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi growers’ determination to plant corn last spring is paying off as harvests approach 2012’s record yields of 165 bushels per acre.

Persistent rains and low temperatures in the spring delayed planting, slowed emergence and contributed to less than desirable final stands. Cool weather through May also slowed corn growth and maturity by about two weeks throughout the season.

Jerry Singleton, area agent in Leflore County with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said he is almost afraid to say how good the yields appear to be.

Barry Stewart, turf management specialist with the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, demonstrates fertilizing equipment on Aug. 29, 2013, on a recently cut patch of St. Augustine grass grown at Mississippi State University's R.R. Foil Research Center. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
August 30, 2013 - Filed Under: Turfgrass and Lawn Management

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- This year’s rainy spring kept grass from growing, but it also kept contractors from building, allowing Mississippi’s sod farmers to manage the season’s rough beginning.

Barry Stewart, turf management specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service and Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, said demand was low at a time that benefitted growers.

The state's cotton remains two to four weeks behind schedule after rains delayed spring planting. One cotton boll is nearing maturity as another flower blooms on this cotton plant Aug. 23, 2013, on Mississippi State University's R.R. Foil Plant Science Research Center in Starkville. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
August 23, 2013 - Filed Under: Cotton

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi’s cotton growers are hoping weather challenges don’t prevent their late-planted crop from making the good yields it seems capable of producing.

Darrin Dodds, state cotton specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said the bulk of the crop was in pretty decent shape by late August.

“Some folks feel they are sitting on one of the better crops they’ve had,” he said. “All that will boil down to the weather we have in the fall. We need a long, favorable fall, and the heat to stick with us and the rain to stay away.”

Ample summer rains have provided this cow with plenty of grass in her Oktibbeha County pasture on Aug. 16, 2013. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
August 16, 2013 - Filed Under: Beef

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Rains are taking some feed-cost pressure off Mississippi cattle producers as the end of summer approaches.

Jane Parish, beef specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said summer droughts often reduce hay yields, and the resulting sparse grass in pastures can trigger hay feedings before the first frost hits. This year, rains across most of the state have had the opposite effect and kept grass abundant.

Rocky Lemus, forage specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, examines stem maggot damage on the tips of bermudagrass growing in research plots in the forage unit at the Henry H. Leveck Animal Research Farm in Starkville on Aug. 7, 2013. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
August 9, 2013 - Filed Under: Forages, Insects-Forage Pests

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Forage producers and their livestock are not the only ones admiring the plentiful bermudagrass fields and pastures across the state this year.

Another invasive insect has arrived in Mississippi, this time to take a bite out of potentially strong hay yields. Stem maggots are joining the list of invasive species in the state that includes fire ants, fall armyworms, kudzu bugs, and once upon a time, boll weevils.

Trent Irby, soybean specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, evaluates the maturity of soybean plants on Aug. 2, 2013, in a research plot located at the R.R. Foil Plant Science Research Center in Starkville, Miss. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
August 2, 2013 - Filed Under: Agricultural Economics, Soybeans

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- The spring’s planting challenges and last year’s Midwest drought boosted soybean prices for a while, but the winds of change are starting to blow.

Brian Williams, agricultural economist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said the soybean market had been strong until mid-July. The market typically drops before harvest, but he said prices dropped a bit faster this year.

Truck crop production is increasing steadily in Mississippi as consumers demand high-quality, local produce. Thomas Horgan examines tomatoes growing in test plots at Mississippi State University's North Mississippi Research and Extension Center in Verona on July 16. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Bonnie Coblentz)
July 26, 2013 - Filed Under: Fruit, Commercial Horticulture, Farmers Markets

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Greater consumer demand for locally grown produce has made truck crops a bigger part of the state’s overall agricultural production and increased related research at Mississippi State University.

Truck crops get their name from the fact that they are often sold from the back of pickup trucks. They are produce crops, including blueberries, strawberries, sweet corn, beans, tomatoes, watermelon, greens and squash.

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