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Crop Report from 2019

Two men facing each other in conversation and standing beside a tractor and equipment with a clear, blue sky overhead.
May 15, 2019 - Filed Under: Crops, Corn

Corn producers rushed to finish planting -- or replanting -- as much as sunny weather has allowed so far in May.

Rows of young rice plants sticking several inches above ground.
June 10, 2019 - Filed Under: Crops, Rice, Farming

STONEVILLE, Miss. -- The third week of March is usually the beginning of rice planting season in Mississippi, but fields were not dry enough to hold tractors until May in most locations.

Many growers were still scrambling to get rice in the ground by early June due to unusually high rain amounts in the first quarter of 2019. While more than 90 percent of the crop had been planted as of June 3, only 74 percent had emerged, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This is well behind the five-year average of 92 percent emerged by this date.

Four large, ripe watermelons lie among vines in the field.
June 21, 2019 - Filed Under: Watermelon Cantaloupe and Cucumber, Watermelons

Some Mississippi watermelon producers lost crops or got a late start because of wet spring weather. But consumers should find the sweet, summer treats on shelves in time for the July 4 holiday.

A small, white sign on top of a silver stake in the foreground tells what kind of cotton plants are behind it. In the background are rows of cotton plants with green leaves but not yet containing cotton blooms.
July 12, 2019 - Filed Under: Cotton

All of Mississippi’s 2019 cotton crop has emerged, but it’s off to a slow start.

Of approximately 700,000 acres of cotton planted statewide this year, 57% is rated fair or worse by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as of July 8.

Rows of young soybean plants sticking a foot above ground.
July 30, 2019 - Filed Under: Crops, Soybeans, Farming

The process of planting this year’s soybean crop in Mississippi has been anything but normal.

The only consistent variable has been rain, and a lot of it -- from an unusually wet winter and spring to the stormwater the state received from Hurricane Barry. Growers have done their best to plant in tight windows of time when both the clouds and the ground were dry. A long, stop-start planting season has been the result.

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