Seafood Marketing

Mississippi Seafood Marketing

The MSU Extension Service maintains a free online marketing program for food and seafood producers to promote their products and services.

What is MarketMaker?

MarketMaker is the largest and most in-depth database of its kind featuring a diverse community of food-related businesses: buyers, farmers/ranchers, fisheries, farmers markets, processors/packers, wineries, restaurants and more.

Why do consumers and buyers use MarketMaker?

To locate food suppliers selling just what they need. They can search for the nearest suppliers of locally grown catfish, salmon, tilapia, hybrid striped bass, trout, freshwater prawn, saltwater shrimp, crawfish, oysters, mussels or clams.

Why register your business at Marketmaker?

Through MarketMaker, producers can reach more buyers and more efficiently form profitable business alliances with other businesses handling fish and shellfish products, including processors, wholesalers, retailers, and restaurants.

Where can you find Mississippi MarketMaker?

MarketMaker can be viewed online at http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/.   
Ask Siri or Cortana to search for “Mississippi MarketMaker” on your smart phone.

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News

Filed Under: Crops, Commercial Horticulture, Commercial Fruit and Nuts, Beef, Beekeeping, Forestry, Seafood Economics March 3, 2017

BILOXI, Miss. -- Mississippi State University researchers and Extension Service agents heard suggestions from Coastal area agricultural producers and industry leaders about the research and education they need from the university in 2017.

The MSU Coastal Research and Extension Center Producer Advisory Council meeting was held on Feb. 28 in Biloxi. The annual meeting helps the university allocate time and resources to the most important issues facing Mississippi's agricultural producers and related industries.

Shrimp boats at rest in the Biloxi Small Craft Harbor in Biloxi, Mississippi, Jan. 25, 2016. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Kevin Hudson)
Filed Under: Seafood Economics July 7, 2016

BILOXI, Miss. -- Wild-caught shrimp contribute millions of dollars to Mississippi’s economy each year, and experts say better flavor gives them a competitive advantage over imported and pond-raised shrimp.

Dave Burrage, Mississippi State University Extension Service fisheries specialist, said consumers who participate in blind taste tests tend to prefer the taste of wild-caught Gulf shrimp over that of pond-raised, imported products.

Mississippi’s shrimp season, which opened June 6, is mostly yielding small brown shrimp. However, hot weather and warmer water in the Gulf is creating ideal growing conditions for the shrimp. (File Photo by MSU Extension Service/Kevin Hudson)
Filed Under: Seafood Economics, Seafood Harvesting and Processing June 17, 2016

BILOXI, Miss. -- Selling directly to the public takes longer, but it allows fishermen to make some profit from a shrimp season that has been below average so far this year in Mississippi.

Dave Burrage, commercial and recreational fisheries specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said shrimp landed in Mississippi have been small through mid-June.

Low prices and an unusual season are making it difficult for Mississippi fishermen to harvest the state's shrimp crop. (Photo by MSU Extension/Dave Burrage)
Filed Under: Seafood Economics, Seafood Harvesting and Processing July 31, 2015

BILOXI, Miss. -- Mississippi fishermen remain intent on harvesting this year’s shrimp crop in the shallow waters of the Gulf of Mexico despite low prices and a season paused and restarted.

Dave Burrage, Mississippi State University Extension professor of marine resources at the Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi, said the shrimp season first opened June 3, closed June 19 when shrimp were too small, and then reopened July 13.

“This season has been an anomaly so far,” Burrage said.

The bulk of the 1.137 million pounds of shrimp landed in Biloxi during the first two weeks of the season have been medium, 36- to 40-count shrimp. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
Filed Under: Agriculture, Catfish, Seafood Economics, Seafood Harvesting and Processing June 22, 2012

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The shrimp are slightly bigger, but prices are down, making this year’s season-opening in Biloxi comparable to last year’s start.

During the first two weeks of the 2012 season, 1.137 million pounds of shrimp were landed in Biloxi. In the same time in 2011, 1.124 million pounds were landed at the same port.

Shrimp season began May 30, and 210 boats went out for the opening day. To date, the bulk of the production has been medium, 36- to 40-count shrimp, a reference to the number of shrimp needed to make a pound.

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Your Extension Experts

Assoc Extension/Research Prof
Seafood and specialty crops marketing; Marine and disaster economics