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Planting Fall Bulbs

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Friday, August 10, 2018 - 2:00am

Host: Gary Bachman, Ornamental Horticulture Specialist

Transcription:

We generally think of planting bulbs for spring flowering, but there are great fall bulb plants today on Southern Gardening

Southern Gardening with Gary Bachman is produced by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

One of the most recognizable spring bulb flowers are crocus. But there are several fall blooming crocus that are worth taking a look. The grass like leaves emerge after flowering and will remain until spring. Plant about two inches deep and two inches apart in late summer for fall flowering. They are hardy through zones 5 to 9. 

Crocus speciousous flowering peaks in peaks in mid-autumn. The flowers vary from a blue violet to a mauve and are about six inches tall. And crocus satifus is an interesting species that has culinary interest and is called the safrene crocus. The clear pastel violet flowers contain one of the most expensive spices in the world. Each flower will produce three showy red stigmas which is the source of Safran. It takes as many as 75,000 flowers to produce one pound of Safran. 

A fall bulb that is easily confused with crocus is colchicum. In fact, both are sometimes called autumn crocus. Colchicums have large strap-like foliage with a more dainty flower that follows. Colchicum speciosum has rose violet tulip shaped flowers that grow up to twelve inches tall. Each bulb will produce multiple stems and they will readily multiply. 

 

Colchicum Autumn now has pale pastel pink flowers that reach up to six inches tall. Plant Colchicums in the late summer, four inches deep and four to six inches apart. Crocus and Colchicum look great poking through leaves or a ground cover like sedum in the fall.

 

I am Horticulturist, Gary Bachman for Southern Gardening.

 

Southern Gardening with Gary Bachman is produced by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

 

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