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Hardy Hibiscus

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Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:00am

Host: Gary Bachman, Ornamental Horticulture Specialist

Transcription:

We can count on Hardy Hibiscus to brighten our gardens and landscapes today on Southern Gardening.

Southern Gardening with Gary Bachman is produced by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

Hardy Hibiscus are very different from tropical Hibiscus. First, these plants are winter hardy. And second, Hardy Hibiscus doesn’t offer the shiny, glossy leaves of tropical hibiscus. But a trait these two certainly share are the bright, beautiful, and almost gaudy flowers. The flowers of the Hardy Hibiscus are huge! Sometimes up to twelve inches across. In fact, they’re often called dinner-plate hibiscus.

Here are a few of my favorites: the large and sheer deep petals of cranberry crush hibiscus draw your attention inward to the delicate piston and stamen structure. The steamy hibiscus sultry kiss features pretty pink flowers contrasted next to the lobed burgundy foliage. And peppermint flair flowers emerge to bright pink and mature to white except for wild red flicking throughout the petals.

Hardy hibiscus are bushy plants ranging from two to five feet tall. Foliage colors can differ from light to medium green with some selections even offering burgundy and dark purple leaves.

Another type of hardy hibiscus is the native hibiscus coccineus, also called Texas star. But instead of offering a dinner plate flower, this tall plant features striking six-inch red flowers that resemble a star.

So, if you’re ready to feast on a dinner plate full of gaudy color, take a look at some of the different varieties of hardy hibiscus.

I am horticulturist Gary Bachman for Southern Gardening.

Southern Gardening with Gary Bachman is produced by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

 

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