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Southern Gardening from 2019

One cluster of pink, crinkled flowers and some seed-heads are visible with dark-green foliage in the background.
January 7, 2019 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

This January’s temperatures have been drastically different from what we saw during last year’s first month.

Dozens of blue flowers bloom above an uninterrupted sea of green leaves
January 14, 2019 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

Many home gardeners look forward to this time of year to browse catalogs in search of great new plants to enjoy in their 2019 landscapes.

Rich, wide, dark-green leaves with white veins rise from an unfurling center.
January 18, 2019 - Filed Under: Vegetable Gardens

If there’s one vegetable that could be considered the ultimate home-grown vegetable in Mississippi, it has to be collards.

Collards were chosen as a 2019 Mississippi Medallion winner because they are considered absolutely necessary for true Southern cuisine. As a bonus, they’re really easy for home gardeners to grow.

A blooming, yellow daffodil in focus in the foreground with a large cluster of other daffodils behind it out of focus.
January 28, 2019 - Filed Under: Master Gardener

One of the signs that spring will be sprung in the near future is when the daffodils start awakening and poking up in the landscape beds.

Large clusters of red flowers rise above bronze-colored leaves in a pot placed on a wooden deck with a wooden fence behind.
February 4, 2019 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

We survived the latest polar vortex, and I join other Mississippi gardeners in being thankful that we didn’t get the really extreme cold our friends up North experienced. But still, it was cold enough for me and my garden. 

A wetlands area is full of gray trunks of trees with filtered light shining through green leaves.
February 11, 2019 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

This week, we continue our look at the 2019 Mississippi Medallion plants with a fantastic Mississippi tree, the tupelo. Tupelo is known botanically as Nyssa sylvatica and is commonly called black tupelo or black gum.

Southern Gardening Archive