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News Filed Under Landscape Architecture

A person wearing yellow gloves using a pair of loppers to prune roses.
February 10, 2021 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture

Video by Michaela Parker

Pruning your rose bushes is one late winter chore you shouldn’t overlook! It’s so easy to neglect yard maintenance, especially during cold weather. Pruning helps shape the bush, remove dead canes, open the center for air flow, and stimulate new growth. 

Pruning any plant can be intimidating at first, but it’s actually quite easy. Before you get started, it’s comforting to know that roses are very forgiving plants. They will grow out of many mistakes you may make. Whew!

Four people stand on a bridge while cutting a ceremonial ribbon.
February 1, 2021 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture, Natural Resources

Two new architectural features at the Mississippi State University Crosby Arboretum in Picayune are now open to the public. The Mirror Perch Bridge and the adjacent Rosen Pavilion were formally unveiled during a ribbon cutting and dedication ceremony Jan. 23.

February 1, 2021 - Filed Under: Landscape Design and Management, Landscape and Garden Design, Professionals Corner, Smart Landscapes, Turfgrass and Lawn Management

The Mississippi State University Extension Service is leading a research project aimed at enhancing pollinator habitat in managed turfgrass of the Southeast.

Seed packets on a display in a garden store.
December 21, 2020 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture

Staying on top of your gardening chores can be quite the task. When do you plant shrubs? When do you prune crape myrtles? That’s why we’re here!

Yellow flowers turned brown.
November 24, 2020 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Landscape Architecture, Trees

12/12. We’ve finally reached the end of 2020. I think everyone can agree that it’s been a heavy year. Here’s to 2021, right? I hope staying active in your lawn and garden has brought you a sense of normalcy during this crazy year. If anything, hopefully it’s been a good distraction!

 A tree lays on the ground with its entire root system exposed.
November 2, 2020 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Landscape and Garden Design, Trees

I had planned to write again this week about more great cool-season color options, but we had a landscape and garden crasher named Hurricane Zeta make a mess on the Gulf coast.

This storm surprised most folks with its intensity and property damage. It also did a lot -- and I do mean a lot -- of damage to trees that resulted in widespread power outages. My family and neighbors were lucky that our power was off for only 48 hours.

A man raking leaves into a wheelbarrow.
October 27, 2020 - Filed Under: Master Gardener, Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture, Landscape Management, Trees

Video by Michaela Parker 

The year is winding down. The weather is finally cooling off and the leaves are slowly, but surely, changing colors. Cooler weather means fewer things to do in your garden. (Are you rejoicing or feeling bummed?) Before we wrap up the year, however, complete a few tasks in your lawn and garden to be ready for the spring! Here are four tasks to do in November:

A bird eats seed from a feeder.
October 15, 2020 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Plants and Wildlife, Urban and Backyard Wildlife

RAYMOND, Miss. -- When all things “pumpkin spice” start filling up your social media feed, you know it’s time to start winter preparations for backyard wildlife.

Many people feel invigorated to get outside and do yard work in the first cool days of October.  To help you channel this energy, here are some easy tips on how to provide needed habitat for our critter friends while still tidying up the yard.

A hand with a a grey glove on planting a series of bulbs in the soil.
September 28, 2020 - Filed Under: Master Gardener, Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture, Soil Testing

Video by Michaela Parker

We’ve finally made it to fall! The temperatures are dropping, the leaves are changing colors, and I can’t wait to purchase pumpkins and mums for my front porch! 

If you’re trying to stay on top of what tasks you should be doing in your yard and garden, check out these four for the month of October.

A person using their foot to shovel dirt from a trench.
September 24, 2020 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Landscape Architecture, Smart Landscapes

Backyard drainage problems are not fun to deal with. A big rain comes and suddenly your backyard turns into a puddled mess! Having standing water in your yard can lead to turf diseases, mold, or wood rot to your home. Nobody wants to have to deal with that! Consider installing a French drain in your yard during the upcoming fall and winter months. A French drain allows water to naturally drain from your yard. 

An assortment of litter retrieved from a watershed displayed on a wooden dock.
September 17, 2020 - Filed Under: Coronavirus, Places for Wildlife, Natural Resources, Waste Management, Water, Wildlife, Urban and Backyard Wildlife

Are you tired of seeing used masks and gloves dropped in the parking lot at the grocery store? Me, too!

“Pandemic litter” is a relatively new problem, but pollution is nothing new. I grew up watching the ad that admonished, “Give a hoot, don’t pollute!”

Battling the coronavirus requires the use of some single-use items, but they don’t have to end up on the ground!

Here are three tips to help keep Mississippi beautiful!

Branches covered in white, felt-like spots are framed by green leaves.
September 16, 2020 - Filed Under: Insects-Pests, Landscape Management

A constantly updated map showing the spread of crape myrtle bark scale helps Mississippians stay aware of this treatable pest that threatens the beauty of one of the state’s most common landscape shrubs.

An assortment of litter retrieved from a watershed displayed on a wooden dock.
September 10, 2020 - Filed Under: Coronavirus, Places for Wildlife, Natural Resources, Waste Management, Water, Wildlife, Urban and Backyard Wildlife

Increased littering of single-use items related to the novel coronavirus pandemic, including masks, gloves, and disinfecting wipes, has troubling consequences for the environment.
When trash is not properly disposed of, it makes its way into watersheds, where it travels by water flow from rivers and streams into the ocean.

Four house plants in white pots.
August 28, 2020 - Filed Under: Master Gardener, Lawn and Garden, Cut Flowers and Houseplants, Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture, Turfgrass and Lawn Management, Vegetable Gardens, Weed Control for Lawn and Garden

And just like that, we’re three-fourths through the year! Cooler temperatures will be here before we know it, hopefully sooner rather than later. Even though we all know the heat will stay around a little longer, it’s time to start preparing for fall and winter.

A wooden model of a building rests on a table in an exhibit hall.
August 26, 2020 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture

An exhibition of unbuilt structures by internationally renowned architect E. Fay Jones intended to accompany the completed Mississippi State University Pinecote Pavilion is on display in Washington, D.C.

Two wooden chairs on a porch underneath a tan shade sail.
August 21, 2020 - Filed Under: Landscape Architecture, Smart Landscapes

If there’s one thing all Mississippians can agree on, it’s that the summer sun can be brutal. I enjoy spending time on my back patio, but it’s hard to enjoy without shade. I’ve noticed several restaurants, parks, and pools have installed shade sails to provide shade to visitors. Why not install one in your own back yard? 

A cluster of bright pink roses.
July 30, 2020 - Filed Under: Master Gardener, Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture

Whew. It’s hot outside! Just a trip to the mailbox makes me break into a sweat. As you’re outside working in your lawn and garden, remember to stay hydrated and come inside if you start feeling overheated Here are four tasks to complete in your yard for the month of August: 

An orange butterfly on a yellow flower.
July 23, 2020 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Landscape Architecture, Smart Landscapes

What are pollinators and why are they important? Bats, bees, beetles, birds, butterflies, and other mammals play a vital role in our environment. These creatures help move pollen from one flower to another, which helps fertilize plants so they can reproduce.

A bright green moss pathway with large pavers.
July 9, 2020 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Landscape Architecture, Landscape Design and Management, Landscape and Garden Design, Smart Landscapes

A moss pathway is an easy way to add a special touch of elegance, enchantment, and royalty to your landscape. A pathway covered with bright green moss seems like something a king or queen would have in their landscape, right? 

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