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News Filed Under Crops

Ripe muscadines on a vine with green foliage.
November 12, 2019 - Filed Under: Fruit

Video by Michaela Parker

Muscadines are a great fruit to grow at your home, especially here in Mississippi. They thrive in warm, humid weather, making them the perfect fruit to grow in your backyard! If you have been thinking about setting up a muscadine vineyard, here are a few tips to get you started.

Multiple sweet potatoes in a box.
November 8, 2019 - Filed Under: Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes and yams. They’re the same thing, right?

Not really. They look and taste different. Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) are sweeter with a smooth, thin skin. (Photo by Kevin Hudson)

November 5, 2019 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Corn, Cotton, Rice, Soybeans

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Cotton leafroll dwarf virus is capable of causing significant yield loss and was reported for the first time in Mississippi earlier this year.

The implications of this disease will be a major focus of the 2019 Mississippi State University Row Crop Short Course Dec. 2-4 at the Cotton Mill Conference Center in Starkville. This course is hosted by the MSU Extension Service and Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station.

Eric Stafne kneels beside a newly planted blueberry bush.
November 5, 2019 - Filed Under: Commercial Fruit and Nuts, Fruit

Blueberries aren’t just delicious. They’re high in antioxidants, fiber, and vitamins, which is part of the reason they have gained popularity in our kitchens. (Photo by Jonathan Parrish/MSU Extension)

A pecan tree orchard with an irrigation system.
November 1, 2019 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Commercial Fruit and Nuts

RAYMOND, Miss. -- Despite the weather challenges this year, most Mississippi pecan producers expect a good yield.

However, a wet spring and late-summer drought could mean nut loss and lessened nut quality for some growers.

A combine moves through a field, pouring harvested grain into a tractor driving alongside.
October 18, 2019 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Soybeans

Producers are tracing the mixed results they see from the 2019 Mississippi soybean harvest back to early struggles getting the crop started.

Ripe muscadines on the vine.
October 15, 2019 - Filed Under: Fruit

If you want to grow muscadines at your home, choosing the right variety can be intimidating. With so many varieties to pick from, how do you know you’re picking the right one?

A pure white cotton boll opens on a brown stem.
October 4, 2019 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Cotton

Parts of Mississippi’s landscape are turning white, but unlike some northern areas, this coloration is caused by cotton bolls opening for harvest, not snow accumulation.

Two tractors pull harvest carts across a dusty field.
September 27, 2019 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Sweet Potatoes

Spring rains created two sweet potato crops in Mississippi, and the later-planted crop is shaping up to be better than the first as harvests get underway.

September 19, 2019 - Filed Under: Soybeans, Agri-business

The Mississippi State University Extension Service Plant Diagnostic Lab is offering free nematode testing for all Mississippi-grown soybeans through Aug. 30, 2020.

White ends on a piece of red machinery are poised in front of a row of dried, brown corn on a farm with a piece of green farm machinery in the background.
September 13, 2019 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Corn

A difficult planting season followed by heavy rains and drainage issues challenged corn producers, but growers are still expected to produce a good crop despite these tough conditions.

August 19, 2019 - Filed Under: Rice, Community

Mississippi’s 259 rice-producing farms rank the state No. 5 nationally in rice production, a fact highlighted in September when Mississippians are urged to “Think Rice.”

A crowd sits under tents as a speaker addresses them.
August 7, 2019 - Filed Under: Fruit

People can learn about timely topics related to muscadine vines during the 2019 Muscadine Field Day Aug. 29 in Carriere.

Rows of young soybean plants sticking a foot above ground.
July 30, 2019 - Filed Under: Crops, Soybeans, Farming

The process of planting this year’s soybean crop in Mississippi has been anything but normal.

The only consistent variable has been rain, and a lot of it -- from an unusually wet winter and spring to the stormwater the state received from Hurricane Barry. Growers have done their best to plant in tight windows of time when both the clouds and the ground were dry. A long, stop-start planting season has been the result.

A man holds pruning loppers as he stands next to a tall blueberry bush.
July 16, 2019 - Filed Under: Commercial Fruit and Nuts, Fruit

Pruning is a task I put off, and my blueberry bushes serve as a testament to this fact. Mainly, I am unsure how to do it correctly most of the time and don’t want to kill my plants.

A small, white sign on top of a silver stake in the foreground tells what kind of cotton plants are behind it. In the background are rows of cotton plants with green leaves but not yet containing cotton blooms.
July 12, 2019 - Filed Under: Cotton

All of Mississippi’s 2019 cotton crop has emerged, but it’s off to a slow start.

Of approximately 700,000 acres of cotton planted statewide this year, 57% is rated fair or worse by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as of July 8.

July 3, 2019 - Filed Under: Crops, Farm Safety, Food Safety

The Alliance of Sustainable Farms will host a field day at the Truck Crops Branch Experiment Station July 19.

Four large, ripe watermelons lie among vines in the field.
June 21, 2019 - Filed Under: Watermelon Cantaloupe and Cucumber, Watermelons

Some Mississippi watermelon producers lost crops or got a late start because of wet spring weather. But consumers should find the sweet, summer treats on shelves in time for the July 4 holiday.

The rusty poles of an overhead, pivot irrigation system and a thin row of trees rise from the waves and gray floodwaters under a bleak sky.
June 20, 2019 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Corn, Cotton, Soybeans, Farming, Community, Disaster Response

Although numbers on paper look about right for Mississippi row crops, the reality is actually quite grim in places.

Rows of young rice plants sticking several inches above ground.
June 10, 2019 - Filed Under: Crops, Rice, Farming

STONEVILLE, Miss. -- The third week of March is usually the beginning of rice planting season in Mississippi, but fields were not dry enough to hold tractors until May in most locations.

Many growers were still scrambling to get rice in the ground by early June due to unusually high rain amounts in the first quarter of 2019. While more than 90 percent of the crop had been planted as of June 3, only 74 percent had emerged, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This is well behind the five-year average of 92 percent emerged by this date.

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