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Hunting

Hunting and other wildlife-related recreation has a strong and rich heritage in Mississippi. People from all over the United States come to Mississippi to hunt one of the largest white-tailed deer populations on the North American continent, as well as a superb wild turkey, duck, and small game populations. According to the results of a large national survey, over 309,000 individuals hunted in Mississippi during 2006 and spent over $557 million in hunting-related expenses. The policies and regulations associated with hunting and fishing in Mississippi are developed and enforced by theMississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks. Please visit their website for more information:

Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks: This web site lists hunting and archery season dates, trapping information, bag limits, regulations, and license information for Mississippi quail, rabbit, squirrel, raccoon, opossum, bobcat, frog, deer, turkey, goose, dove, crow, duck, snipe, rails, waterfowl, and small and big game and migratory birds.

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Healthy mourning dove populations allow opportunities for recreational hunting. Habitat establishments begin in the spring by planting small fields with a variety of grains such as sorghum, browntop millet and sunflowers. (Submitted photo)
Filed Under: Wildlife, Urban and Backyard Wildlife August 18, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Mourning doves are popular game birds and songbirds in North America. Common in urban and suburban environments, they often are seen perched on utility wires or feeding in fallow grain fields or on the ground under bird feeders.

Mourning doves have a plump body, small head, buffy feathers with scattered black wing spots, long tail feathers, and short, pink legs. It is smaller and less colorful than its pigeon cousins that are often seen around city parks, bridges and silos.

Indoor classroom lessons about vertebrates are part of this Master Naturalist course in Jackson, Mississippi. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Adam Rohnke)
Filed Under: Natural Resources, Wildlife August 11, 2017

RAYMOND, Miss. -- Funding and manpower are cited as the most common limiting factors in conducting research, especially for wildlife and fisheries studies, which can cover huge areas, involve secretive animals and collect large quantities of information.

Wild pigs have been part of the landscape in the Southeast since Hernando de Soto released them in the 1500s as a source of food for settlers. In the last 20 years, the nuisance animals have increased their range and population in Mississippi, threatening native wildlife and causing millions of dollars in damage to crops, land, timber, structures and farm equipment each year. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Steven Tucker)
Filed Under: Natural Resources, Environment, Forestry, Nuisance Wildlife and Damage Management July 19, 2017

RAYMOND, Miss. -- Wild pigs have roamed parts of the Southeast since Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto introduced them as food for early settlers in the 16th century. But during the last two decades, Mississippi has experienced a rapid uptick in the spread of the nuisance animal.

Filed Under: Natural Resources, Environment, Fisheries, Forestry, Invasive Plants, Marine Resources, Water, Wildlife July 18, 2017

BILOXI, Miss. -- Individuals interested in learning more about conservation of Mississippi's natural resources can attend the Coastal Mississippi Master Naturalist class.

The seven-week course begins at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 7 at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center, located at 1815 Popp's Ferry Road in Biloxi. Classes meet once a week at various locations through Oct. 17. Weekday classes meet from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Weekend classes begin at 9 a.m. and end at 4 p.m.

Retreating into its shell will not protect this box turtle from most road dangers. If conditions are safe, render aid by moving or encouraging snakes and turtles off roads in the directions they are already headed. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Evan O’Donnell)
Filed Under: Wildlife, Urban and Backyard Wildlife July 14, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- With the temperature rising daily, it is getting more common to spot turtles and snakes basking on the roads. Being aware of this change in reptile behavior can help drivers avoid hitting them.

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