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Growing Micro Greens

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Tuesday, January 2, 2018 - 2:15am

Host: Gary Bachman, Ornamental Horticulture Specialist

Transcription:

Now that the cold of winter is starting to settle in, let me share a tip to how to keep the fresh greens on the table today on Southern Gardening.

Southern Gardening with Gary Bachman is produced by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

An easy way to garden through the winter is to grow an indoor microgreens garden. Microgreens are nutritious and a delicious way to brighten any winter mood. Arugula Asian greens like Bacho and Kenco and spicy muslin mix are all easy to grow choices. Purple chorabi, red cabbage, and red beets make colorful additions to any meal. Microgreens are sometimes called vegetable confetti and can be used as a decorative addition to dinner. Or when blended together, they can be a colorful salad.

Growing microgreens is easy and only requires a small space on a windowsill or under a light. And any size container will do. Bedding plant trays or plastic clam shells are good containers. Sprinkle seeds of your favorite greens on the surface of the moistened growing mix. Gently tamp and cover. After a couple of days, the seeds will be germinating. After seven days, the seeds will be ready to start harvesting.

Sowing seeds weekly can ensure a steady supply of microgreens. And some of the latest research shows that microgreens actually have more vitamins and nutrients than their fully mature plants. For example, microgreen red cabbage has 6 the vitamin C and 40 times the vitamin E than mature red cabbage. Other microgreens have more vitamin K, lutein, and beta carotene.

So keep the garden growing indoors all winter long with these fresh microgreens. You’ll be sure to enjoy fresh tasting salads on a cold wintery day.

I’m horticulturist Gary Bachman for Southern Gardening.

Southern Gardening with Gary Bachman is produced by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

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