You are here

HappyHealthy December Newsletter: Zucchini

Filed Under:
Publication Number: P3408
View as PDF: P3408.pdf

Helping Mississippians live happier, healthier lives!

Zucchini is a vegetable that can be eaten raw, steamed, grilled, roasted, or sautéed. Bake it into a bread or eat the flowers from the zucchini plant … now that’s tasty!

Select

  • Choose zucchini that is small and firm, with bright green, glossy skin.
  • Avoid zucchinis that are very large, bruised, soft, or dull on the surface.
  • Large zucchinis have more seeds and are tougher.

Prepare

  • Rinse zucchini under running water. Scrub with a vegetable brush to remove heavy dirt or wax.
  • Leave the skin on fresh zucchini.
  • Cut off the stem.
  • Slice the zucchini lengthwise into strips or crosswise into coins.
  • For large zucchini, remove seeds and shred for baking muffins or bread.

Store

  • Keep zucchini unwashed in an open plastic bag in the vegetable crisper drawer in your refrigerator for up to 4 days for the best quality.
  • To freeze fresh zucchini for baking, wash, grate, and steam blanch. Pre-measure amounts for baking recipes and place in freezer bags or containers in the freezer. Frozen zucchini stays fresh for 3–4 months.
  • To learn more about cutting and roasting zucchini, visit HappyHealthy.MS and click on Tips and Videos.
    • How to Store Fruits and Vegetables
    • How to Freeze Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

Fun with Food

Children can help:

  • In the garden, children can help with preparing the soil, planting, weeding, and harvesting.
  • In the grocery produce section, children can help select zucchini.
  • In the kitchen, children can help rinse the zucchini and gather the cooking utensils.

Children can learn:

  • Zucchini can be eaten as a snack or part of a meal.
  • Cooking skills working with fresh zucchini.

Enjoy

Roasted Zucchini or Yellow Squash

  • 1¼ pounds zucchini or yellow squash
  • 2 teaspoons oil
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¼ teaspoon dried oregano
  • ⅛ teaspoon salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon black pepper
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.
  2. Wash your hands well with soap and hot water.
  3. Line a large pan or cookie sheet with aluminum foil. Set it aside.
  4. Wash the squash. Trim ends and cut in half lengthwise. Then cut each piece into half-moon pieces about ½-inch thick.
  5. Put the zucchini or squash pieces into a large plastic storage bag.
  6. Add the oil, garlic powder, oregano, salt, and pepper.
  7. Shake the bag until the pieces are coated with oil and spices.
  8. Place the pieces on the pan lined with foil. Spread them out into an even layer.
  9. Put the pan in the oven. Bake for about 20 minutes. When the squash pieces are light brown and tender, but still a little crisp, they are done.
  10. Refrigerate leftovers within 2 hours.

Baked Zucchini Sticks

  • 2 medium zucchini
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ cup water
  • 2 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan cheese
  • ¾ cup bread crumbs
  • 1 tablespoon Italian seasoning
  1. Wash your hands well with soap and hot water.
  2. Wash zucchini and trim off top and end.
  3. Cut zucchini in half and then cut each half lengthwise.
  4. Lay flat side of zucchini down and cut into three sticks.
  5. Microwave zucchini sticks for about 2 minutes, then pat dry with a paper towel.
  6. Crack egg into a bowl.
  7. Add water to bowl with egg mixture and mix well using a fork.
  8. Mix cheese, bread crumbs, and Italian seasoning together in a bowl.
  9. Preheat oven to broil.
  10. Dip zucchini sticks first into the egg mixture and then into the bread crumb mixture.
  11. Arrange zucchini in rows on a greased baking pan. Broil zucchini sticks for about 10–12 minutes, turning once while cooking.
  12. Refrigerate leftovers within 2 hours.

NOTE: Serve with low-fat ranch dressing or spaghetti sauce for dipping.


Publication 3408 (12-19)

By Dottie Kenda, Regional Registered Dietitian, Extension Southwest Region.

Mississippi State University is an equal opportunity institution.

Extension Service of Mississippi State University, cooperating with U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published in furtherance of Acts of Congress, May 8 and June 30, 1914. GARY B. JACKSON, Director

Department: Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion

The Mississippi State University Extension Service is working to ensure all web content is accessible to all users. If you need assistance accessing any of our content, please email the webteam or call 662-325-2262.

Select Your County Office

Authors

Portrait of Ms. Dorothy Kenda
Regional Registered Dietitian

Your Extension Experts

Portrait of Dr. David Buys
Assistant Professor
State Health Specialist