You are here

2020 Mississippi 4-H Horse Show Education Contests: Rules and Regulations

Filed Under:
Publication Number: M2322
View as PDF: M2322.pdf

Drawing of a horse's head.

Horse Bowl will be held on Saturday, February 15, at the Trade Mart Building in Jackson starting at 9 a.m. All other horse educational contests will take place at MSU in Starkville on March 27 and 28. More details will be emailed closer to the contest dates.

Procedure for Changing Rules and Regulations for the Mississippi State 4-H Horse Show

To inform participants in the 4-H horse program about how rules and regulations are proposed each year, this information has been put together to explain this process, when these meetings occur, and how you can participate in these meetings.

1. The four district 4-H horse shows are held in mid-June, as determined by each district. The Mississippi State 4-H Horse Show is held in late June each year.
2. Before or after the horse shows, each county horse club meets to talk about recommendations they have for the next year. The county horse club then sends one voting delegate to its district horse show meeting.
3. At the district horse show meeting, counties bring their recommendations to discuss. If the proposed item passes at the district meeting, each district compiles these recommended changes and presents them at the state horse meeting.
4. At the state 4-H horse meeting, each district is allowed three votes. These delegates include the Research and Extension Center head from each district (one vote each), while each district decides the other two voting delegates. (NOTE: These two voting delegates MUST NOT work for Extension.) Each proposed rule and regulation is considered, discussed, and voted upon by the three delegates from each of the four districts. The state 4-H horse show meeting is held in midto late September at Mississippi State University in Starkville.
5. The rules and regulations from the state 4-H horse show meeting are then implemented for the following year’s show.

Note that a change in a rule can be proposed by another district at the state meeting that your own district had not considered at your meeting.

Respectfully submitted,

Dean Jousan, PhD

Extension 4-H Livestock Specialist

Mississippi 4-H Horse Clubs Inc.

State Officers

President

Kim Moss, PO Box 733, Bruce 38915

Vice President

Debbie Hughes, 270 CR 1124, Mooreville 38857

Secretary

Dr. Dean Jousan, Box 9815, Mississippi State 39762

Treasurer

Dr. Dean Jousan, Box 9815, Mississippi State 39762

Directors

Northeast District

Dr. Jane Parish, PO Box 1690, Verona 38879

Dr. Linda Mitchell, PO Box 1690, Verona 38879

Johnny Thompson, 4635 County Lake Rd, Starkville 39759

Debbie Hughes, 270 CR 11224, Mooreville 38857

Northwest District

Dr. Steve Martin, PO Box 197, Stoneville 38776

Dr. Curt Lacy, PO Box 197, Stoneville 38776

Kim Moss, PO Box 733, Bruce 38915

Gale Myers, 1244 CR 177, Greenwood 38930

Southeast District

Dr. James Henderson, 1815 Popps Ferry Road, Biloxi 39532

Lynn Strickland, 539 Aunt Jenny Road, Newton 39345

Haley Vogt, 93 Ellis Odom Road, Richton 39476

Southwest District

Dr. Sherry Surrette, 1320 Seven Springs Rd, Raymond 39154

Jamie Laird, 696 Line Creek Road, Morton 39117

Kari Cotten, 2210 Old Hwy 3, Yazoo City 39194

Advisory Council

The president of the Mississippi 4-H Horse Clubs Inc. appoints an advisory council (one person per district) that works on challenges facing the 4-H district and state horse shows. Each member serves a 4-year term. Members of the 2019–2020 Advisory Council include:

Dr. Sandy Slocum (NW), final year

Jamie Laird (SW), 1 year remaining

Chuck Browning (NE), 2 years remaining

Kelley Bates (SE), 3 years remaining

District 4-H Horse Shows

Northeast – Verona – June 11–13

President

Debbie Hughes, 270 CR 1124, Mooreville 38857

Vice President

Johnny Thompson, 4635 County Lake Road, Starkville 39759

Secretary

Gina Wills, 112 Fairground Circle, New Albany 38652

Show Manager

BJ McClenton, 218 West Broad Street, Suite D, West Point 39773

Northwest – Winona – June 11–12

President

Kim Moss, PO Box 733, Bruce 38915

Vice President

Gale Myers, 1244 CR 177, Greenwood 38930

Secretary

Anna Austin, PO Box 726, Winona, 38967

Show Manager

Ira Martin, PO Box 1077, Tunica 38676

Southeast – Gulfport – June 11–12

President

Jerry Odom, 23 Rocking O Lane, Richton 39476

Vice President

Lynn Strickland, 539 Aunt Jenny Road, Newton 39345

Secretary

Amanda Woods, 1060 Hwy 13 South, Columbia 39429

Treasurer

Amanda Woods, 1060 Hwy 13 South, Columbia 39429

Show Manager

Brad Jones, 214 N. Critz St. Suite A, Wiggins 39577

Assistant Show Manager

Leanne McGee, PO Box 188, Decatur 39327

Southwest – Jackson – June 11–12

President

Kelly Holly, 151 Magnolia Road, Brandon 39047

Vice President

Jamie Laird, 696 Line Creek Road, Morton 39117

Secretary

Heather Jennings, 601 Marquette Road, Brandon 39042

Show Manager

Shelby Bearden, PO Box 789, Hazlehurst 39083

Horse Educational Contests

There will be one junior and one senior overall educational contest high-point buckle to be awarded from a compilation of points earned only from the highest three contest placings of the following contests: hippology, horse judging, horse bowl, horse public speaking, horse individual demonstration, and horse team demonstration. Top 10 individual points will be earned from each of these contests. In a contest with more than 10 participants, the high-point individual will get 10 points, down to the 10th-place person getting 1 point. In the event of a tie, the high-point award will go to the individual who beat the greatest number of contestants in the contests from which the three highest contest placings were generated. Points for educational contests will not be combined with points from the horse show.

Junior and Senior High-Point Educational Contest Buckles sponsored by MS 4-H Horse Clubs Inc.

The same junior individuals and/or team members must compete at the state horse show that competed at the district show (cannot substitute horse bowl/horse judging/team demonstration members between district and state horse show educational contests).

All horse educational contest rules and regulations for Horse Bowl, Horse Individual and Team Demonstrations, Horse Public Speaking, Horse Judging, and Hippology will follow the contest rules of the Western National 4-H Roundup found at www.westernnationalroundup.org.

Horse Bowl

Junior and Senior entries must be emailed to Dean Jousan (dean.jousan@msstate.edu) by Friday, January 31, 2020.

The junior and senior contests will be held during the Dixie National Quarter Horse Show on Saturday, February 15, starting at 9 a.m. in the Trade Mart Building on the Mississippi State Fairgrounds in Jackson. Both contests will be double-elimination tournaments.

Objectives

The primary objective of Horse Bowl competition is to provide an opportunity for youth enrolled in 4-H horse projects to demonstrate their knowledge of equine-related matters in a competitive setting, where attitudes of friendliness and fairness prevail. This competition provides an educational experience for participants as well as spectators.

Rules and Regulations

Team and Contestant Eligibility

1. Each county is invited to enter as many teams of four or five contestants as it deems appropriate. One team member will be designated as the alternate if five contestants are entered.
2. Teams may be selected by any procedure the county deems appropriate. Team members must be enrolled in 4-H in the county they represent. The 4-H leader must certify the contestants’ eligibility.
3. Senior contestants must be at least 14, but not more than 18, years of age on January 1 of the current calendar year.
4. Junior contestants must be at least 8, but not more than 13, years of age on January 1 of the current calendar year.

Reference Sources

IDET Illustrated Dictionary of Equine Terms (senior reference)

New Horizons Equine Education Center

Alpine Publications Inc.

P.O. Box 7027, Loveland, CO 80537

(800) 777-7257

HIH Horse Industry Handbooks (First Edition plus added inserts) by American Youth Horse Council (junior and senior reference)

1 Gainer Rd, McDonald, NM 88262

info@ayhc.com

817.320.2005

http://www.ayhc.com/shop

HS Horse Smarts by American Youth Horse Council (senior reference)

1 Gainer Rd, McDonald, NM 88262

info@ayhc.com

817.320.2005

http://www.ayhc.com/shop

Lewis Feeding and Care of the Horse (Second Edition) by Lon Lewis Williams and Wilkins (senior reference)

351 West Camden St., Baltimore, MD 21201-2436

(800) 638-0672

AQHA 2020 American Quarter Horse Association Show Rules (senior reference)

Only show rules will be used.

Parker Equine Science (Fourth edition) by Rick Parker (senior reference); ISBN-13: 9781111138776; Published January 2012

Types of Questions

1. One-on-one questions are questions to which individual contestants may respond. These points will count toward individual and team scores.
2. Toss-up questions are open to response by all contestants. These points will count toward individual and team scores. Three toss-up questions will have bonus questions attached and in general will be somewhat more difficult.
3. Bonus questions are given to the team whose member has just correctly answered a toss-up question. The team is given 10 seconds to confer on this question, which usually has more than one part. All parts of the bonus question must be answered before any points will be awarded. These points will count toward a team score. Only one member of the team will answer, but other team members may feed information to the individual answering.

Equipment

1. Game panels: An appropriate device will be used to provide a clear indication of the first contestant to respond to a question.
2. Time recorders: A stopwatch or other appropriate time device will be required.
3. Scorekeeping devices: Two devices will be needed: one, such as a blackboard, flip chart, or electronic light display, will be used to maintain team scores visible to the contestants and, if possible, to the spectators; a second device will be required and will be used to maintain a record of individual contest scores.

Officials

Moderator: The moderator will direct the matches within that particular room, ask all questions, and designate contestants to answer questions and accept or reject all answers unless the questions and/or answers are challenged. The moderator may indicate when a contestant has exceeded the allocated time for a question. The moderator will declare the match winner and will at all times be in control of the matches.

Referee judges: At least two referee judges are recommended. The judges must be knowledgeable about horses. One referee judge (or the moderator) should, if possible, be a veterinarian. The referee judges rule jointly on the acceptability of any question or answer. In cases of challenges to questions or answers in matches with two referee judges, either both referee judges or one referee judge and the moderator must agree on the acceptability or rejection of any question and/or answer. With only one referee judge, both the judge and the moderator must agree on actions to be taken.

Timekeeper: Unless this duty is assumed by the moderator or by a referee judge, the timekeeper will monitor all time intervals and designate when time of response has been exceeded and will handle all controls of the game equipment. It is strongly recommended that neither the moderator nor a referee judge be used as a timekeeper. The State 4-H Livestock Specialist will have final authority over all procedure protests.

Scorekeepers: At least two individuals will keep score for each contest. The person maintaining team scores will do so in such a manner that all points awarded or taken from each team may be checked. The scores should be clearly visible to the moderator and to the contestants. The second scorekeeper will maintain a record of the individual scores of each contestant.

Teams

1. Each team will consist of not less than four or more than five members.
2. Only four contestants will be seated at the panel at any one time.
3. There will be only one coach designated during any given round.
4. The coach and alternate of each team will sit in an area designated by the moderator.
5. Coaches will not be allowed in the holding room between rounds.
6. During any match, only one team member may be replaced at the panel when—
a) the moderator deems it impossible for one of the seated members of the team to continue in the contest; or
b) the captain or coach of a team requests the replacement of a team member.
7. The team member removed from a match becomes ineligible to return to that particular match. The team member removed and the replacement member both are eligible to participate in further matches. The use of a five-member team is strongly recommended.
8. Counties with two horse bowl teams should not compete against each other in the first round. After numbers are drawn, if teams from the same county meet in the first round, take the team with the higher draw number and move them to the top of the bracket, thereby bumping down the other teams through the bracket. Be sure to check that this did not result in another county having two teams compete against each other in the first round. If this is the result, repeat moving the higher numbered team to the top of the bracket and bumping down all teams again.

Procedures of Play

Match procedures

a) Each match will be divided into two parts based on number of questions (24 questions per round plus 3 bonus questions).
b) In the first part of the match, during the one-on-one competition, only one member of each team will be eligible to respond to a question. This eligibility will rotate, with each question beginning with the number 1 player on each team, and passing to the number 2, 3, and 4 contestants of each team, respectively, until all the one-on-one questions have been asked. The number of questions asked during the first part of the game should be evenly divisible by four to assure each team member an opportunity to respond to the same number of questions (12 questions).
c) During the second part of the match, any individual on either team may respond to a question (12 total questions).
d) The contestant activating the buzzer will have 5 seconds AFTER HAVING BEEN RECOGNIZED BY THE MODERATOR to begin the answer to the question. If the buzzer is activated during the reading of any question, the moderator will immediately stop reading the question.
e) The moderator will continue reading questions (and bonus questions, if applicable) until all questions have been asked.
f) If a question is thrown out because of poor reading by the moderator or a decision of the referee judges, it will be replaced by another question so that the total number of questions to be asked remains consistent.
g) The team captain, coach, or moderator may call for a “time out” for clarification of a rule, to permit replacement of a team member, or to allow for unexpected problems. These “time outs” may be called only after a question has been answered and before the start of the next question.

Starting the contest

a) Teams are assembled and seated at their respective panels, and each contestant is given an opportunity to check the equipment.
b) A team captain is designated and seated at the direction of the moderator in position number 1.
c) The question packet is opened by the moderator.
d) The moderator reads the first question (as with all succeeding questions) until the completion of the reading of the question or until a contestant activates a buzzer. If a buzzer is activated during the reading of any question, the moderator will immediately stop reading the question.
e) The contestant activating the buzzer will have 5 seconds AFTER HAVING BEEN RECOGNIZED BY THE MODERATOR to begin answering the question.
i. The repeating of the question by the contestant will not be considered the initiation of an answer.
ii. It is the responsibility of the moderator and the referee judges to determine if an actual answer is started within the 5-second period.
f) If the answer to a question is incorrect, that team and individual lose one point.
g) If the answer to any question, whether read to completion or not, is incorrect, that same question will be turned over to the other team. If the question was read to completion, it will not be read again. If not read to completion, the moderator will reread the question for the other team. If answered correctly, the appropriate points will be awarded. If answered incorrectly, no penalty points will be imposed.
h) If a member of a team activates a buzzer and an answer has not been started within the 5-second allowable time, there will be an appropriate one-point penalty imposed against the team and the contestant activating the buzzer. The question will be turned over to the other team.

One-on-one questions

a) The moderator will indicate clearly the start of one-on-one play.
b) Each question will be addressed to only one member of each team, beginning with the number 1 contestant of each team and progressing with subsequent questions to the number 2, 3, and 4 contestants, respectively.
c) The moderator will indicate before reading each question which two contestants are eligible to respond.
i. If any contestant other than the two designated contestants responds, that individual and the team will lose two points.
ii. If any contestant responds more than twice to questions directed to another contestant, he or she will be replaced at the panel by the alternate, if available. If no alternate is available, the remainder of the match will be played with less than the full team, and all questions normally addressed to the eliminated contestant will be addressed only to the opposing contestant.
d) There will be no bonus questions asked during the one-on-one period.
e) The point value of a response to a one-on-one question will be as follows:
i. Correct response: +2 points (individual and team)
ii. Incorrect response: -1 point (individual and team)
iii. If both contestants to whom a question is addressed fail to signal intent to attempt an answer in the 5-second allowed time, neither contestant nor team will lose or gain any points. The answer will be given and the next question read.

Toss-up questions

a) The moderator will indicate clearly the start of toss-up questions.
b) The point value of a response to a toss-up question will be as follows:
i. Correct response: +1 point (individual and team)
ii. Incorrect response: -1 point (individual and team)
iii. If no contestant signals intent to attempt an answer in the 5-second allowed time, neither contestant nor team will lose or gain any points. The answer will be given and the next question read.

Bonus questions

a) The moderator will indicate clearly that a bonus question is attached to a toss-up question.
b) A bonus question that is attached to a toss-up question is given to the team whose member has just correctly answered the question.
i. If a bonus question is attached to an unanswered toss-up question, the bonus question is then transferred to the next question.
ii. If a bonus question is attached to an incorrectly answered toss-up question or to a toss-up question that was unanswered following the activation of the buzzer, that bonus question is transferred to the next question.
c) If a bonus question is attached to the correctly answered toss-up question, the moderator then reads the bonus question and a 10-second discussion period is permitted for team consultation to determine the answer. The end of the 10-second period is signaled by the timer. At the signal from the timer, a 5-second period is then permitted for the team captain or designee to begin the answer.
d) All parts of bonus questions must be answered correctly with no partial points permitted, regardless of the number of parts of the question answered correctly.
e) No part of the bonus question will be repeated nor any additional information given to the contestants relative to the question.
f) The point value of a response to a bonus question will be as follows:
i. Correct response: +3 points (does not count toward team participation bonus points)
ii. Incorrect response: -0 points
iii. No answer: -0 points

Team bonus points

a) In order to encourage full team participation, bonus points will be awarded in each match to the teams that have each team member correctly respond to a question other than bonus questions. This bonus is worth two points to either team that qualifies. After having earned this team bonus once within a match, both teams are eligible to earn an additional bonus of two points by repeating the process specified for team bonus awards.
i. In order to obtain these bonus points, each member of the team seated at the time must have correctly answered a question. If a team member who has already answered a question correctly is replaced by an alternate, and that team has not yet earned the bonus points, it will be necessary for the alternate to answer a question correctly before the bonus points are awarded.
ii. No team will be credited toward a team bonus with a member’s second correct response until the first team bonus has been awarded. Each time team bonus points are awarded, the team may again begin accumulating credits for team bonus points.

Completing the contest

a) Following the final question, the team with the highest number of points will be declared the winner of that match.
b) In the event of a tie after the designated number of questions, five additional toss-up questions will be asked. Bonus questions will not be asked if attached to toss-up questions in the overtime period. If a tie remains after the overtime, additional questions will be asked and the first team to win a point (or the first team to have a one-point advantage because of the loss of a point by the other team) will be declared the winner. Tie-breaker points are NOT added to individual scores.
c) Once the moderator has declared a winner based on the scores, there will be no protest.
d) There will be no protest of any questions or answers following the declaration of the winner.

Protesting

1. The protest of a question or an answer to a question may be made only by a team captain or coach, and then only at the time a particular question is read or the answer is given. The moderator and the referee judges will consider the protest, and their decision in all cases is final.
2. When a protest is made, play will be suspended until the protest is resolved.
a) The protesting team and coach will be given 3 minutes to support the protest.
b) Reference source material will be available in the contest room for the team’s use.
c) A one-point team penalty will be assessed if the protest is not upheld.
3. If a protest is sustained, the moderator will take one of the following actions as deemed appropriate:
a) If a question is protested before an answer is given: discard the question. A substitute question will be read.
b) If an answer is protested (either correctly or incorrectly): at least one of the referee judges and the moderator or both referee judges will determine the validity of the protest. Points will be added or subtracted as appropriate.
c) If a question is protested after an answer is given (correctly or incorrectly): at least one referee judge and the moderator or both referee judges will determine the validity of the protest of the question. The question may then be discarded at no loss of points and a substitute question read, or the question may be allowed with the appropriate gain or loss of points as in 3b above.
4. Abuse of protest provisions may result in one or more of the following:
a) Dismissal of team coach from the contest area.
b) Dismissal (or replacement) of team captain.
c) Dismissal of entire team with forfeiture of any points or standing.
5. Spectators, parents, and visitors may not protest any question, answer, or procedure during the course of play. They may, however, submit in writing to the contest officials any suggestions, complaints, or protests at the conclusion of the contest. Unseemly behavior, unsportsmanlike conduct, or any actions that are generally accepted as detrimental to the contest may subject the perpetrators of such actions to dismissal from the immediate area of the contest.
6. No source of information is infallible. It is possible that an answer agrees with the recommended sources, but the sources are, in fact, incorrect or out of date. Every effort will be made to eliminate such questions, but in the event of such occurrence, the referee judges and moderator may agree to:
a) Accept the answer and give an explanation of the correct or updated information for future use of the question.
b) Accept only the correct answer.
c) Replace the question to the appropriate contestants.

Scoring

1. One-on-one questions
a) Correct response: +2 points (individual and team)
b) Incorrect response: -1 point (individual and team)
c) A contestant other than the two designated contestants responds: -2 points (individual and team)
2. Toss-up questions
a) Correct response: +1 point (individual and team)
b) Incorrect response: -1 point (individual and team)
3. Bonus questions
a) Correct response: +3 points (team)
b) Incorrect response: -0 points
4. Miscellaneous
a) Failure to signal or contestant not acknowledged by moderator: -1 point (individual and team)
b) Failure to answer after signaling intent to answer: incorrect answer
5. Team bonus points
a) Every time each seated member of a team has correctly answered at least one question, that team gets two points. No answers will accumulate toward a second team bonus for that team until the first team bonus has been awarded.
6. Protesting
a) Not upheld: -1 point (team)
b) Upheld: -0 points
c) Abused: dismissal of team and loss of all points

Awards

1. Team awards
a) Team awards will be based on a predetermined procedure of play.
i. The exact procedure to be followed must be determined by the number of teams participating and the time allocated for the contest.
ii. Single-elimination brackets will be used for juniors at the district show. Double-elimination brackets will be used for juniors and seniors at the state show.
iii. Every junior team will have the opportunity to participate in at least one match at the district show. Every junior and senior team will have the opportunity to participate in at least two matches at the state show.
b) The rank of teams will be determined on the basis of their position within the double-elimination brackets.
i. After two losses, the teams eliminated in the same round will be placed on the basis of the higher score in the eliminating round.
ii. Ties for team awards will be broken on the basis of: first, high average score for the entire contest; second, highest match score; third, total score of the two matches.
2. Individual awards
a) Scores will be kept for each individual contestant, with the top three individual contestants to receive special recognition.
b) Only those contestants who have participated in three or more matches will be considered for the top individual awards.
i. The three high-match scores for each individual will be used in cases where individuals participate in more than three matches.
ii. Ties for individual awards will be broken on the basis of: first, high average score for the entire contest; second, high individual match scores; and third, total number of points earned in the contest.

Equipment Failure

1. It is the responsibility of each contestant to make sure that all equipment is operating correctly at the start of the match.
2. If the device being used stops working during a match or is believed to be malfunctioning, a “time out” may be called by any contestant, the moderator, or either coach.
3. If after checking it is determined that there is an equipment malfunction, the faulty part(s) will be replaced and play resumed.
4. Scores accumulated up to the point of the “time out” will stand and all further points awarded during the remainder of the match added to or subtracted from this total.
a) If both referee judges or one referee judge and the moderator deem it advisable, points awarded for the two questions asked immediately before the equipment failure may be recalled and two additional questions used.
5. Under no conditions will there be a replay of a match in which there was equipment failure.

Recorders, Cameras, Cell Phones, and Beepers

1. Tape recorders may not be used at any time during the conduct of a match.
2. NO recording devices, such as video cameras, movie cameras, or any other type of camera, may be used during the competition.
3. Photographs will be permitted only before or after a match, and then only if they do not disrupt the contest.
4. Please TURN OFF cell phones and beepers when in the contest room.
5. Transcribing contest questions by any means is prohibited. There will be NO handwriting, typing, recording, or using computers in the contest rooms. Affiliated teams will be eliminated from the competition for violation of this rule.

Horse Individual and Team Demonstrations

Junior and Senior entries must be emailed to Dean Jousan (dean.jousan@msstate.edu) by Friday, March 20, 2020. The contests will be held on Saturday, March 28, on the MSU campus in Starkville. More details will be sent via email.

Eligibility Rules

1. This is an individual contest and a team contest. A team consists of two members.
2. Counties are invited to enter as many contestants as deemed necessary.
3. Participants may be selected by any procedure that a county deems appropriate.
4. Contestants must be enrolled in 4-H in the county they represent.

Contest Rules

1. Speeches and presentations should be original and constructed and delivered by 4-H’ers. Any form of plagiarism is strictly prohibited. Plagiarism can include, but is not limited to: copying parts of a speech or presentation previously presented by another youth or individual; using text, phrases, photos, or diagrams from an article, video, book, movie, or other published work without giving credit to the author. Competitor’s resource citation should be specific, accurate, and honest. If contest officials confirm plagiarism, the contestant will automatically be placed last, with a notation on the scorecard to reflect such infraction.
2. The presentation may be a demonstration or illustrated talk. All references to the term “presentation” in these rules include either demonstration or illustrated talk. A demonstration is defined as a presentation of a step-by-step procedure with an end product or result. An illustrated talk is defined as a presentation of an idea or topic that uses visual aids to convey the message.

Both presentation forms are acceptable and will be evaluated equally, although the delivery methods are different as defined above. Both should use visual aids to help convey the major points of the presentation, and more than one type of visual aid is preferable. Visual aids may include, but are not limited to: handouts, posters, props, videos, slides, and computer-generated media. No live animals may be used.

3. Presentations may be in the format of a demonstration or an illustrated talk. No live animals may be used.
4. Contestants may use notes. However, excessive use of notes may be counted against the contestant. This will be at the discretion of the judges.
5. A public address system will not be used in the contest.
6. Creative audio visual aids may be used, but the contestants must be involved in making or designing them.
7. During the competition, the contestants may introduce themselves by name, county, state, and presentation topic.
8. Senior presentations should be 9–12 minutes in length. Three points will be deducted from the total score on each judge’s score sheet for every minute (or fraction of a minute) under 9 minutes or over 12 minutes. After the individual has been introduced by the superintendent, the time will start once the contestant begins to speak.
9. Junior presentations should be 5–10 minutes in length. Three points will be deducted from the total score on each judge’s score sheet for every minute (or fraction of a minute) under 5 minutes or over 10 minutes. After the individual has been introduced by the superintendent, the time will start once the contestant begins to speak.
10. Contestants should cite their major reference materials at the end of the presentation. This time will not be counted in the allotted time.
11. Only the judge(s) may ask questions of the contestant. Question time will not be counted in the allotted time. Contestants should repeat the question before answering it.
12. Contestant order will be determined by a random drawing and announced before the contest starts.
13. For educational purposes, the management may videotape all demonstrations with individual or team consent.
14. Once an individual or team has started its demonstration (in this case, after they have been introduced by the superintendent), it may not receive assistance from any coach, parent, audience member, or other person, including but not limited to the stroking of any key on a computer or other audio visual device. The penalty for violating this rule is disqualification.
15. Ties will be broken by: first, the judges’ accumulated delivery score; second, the judges’ accumulated organization score; and third, content and accuracy scores.
16. Judges will consider the questions listed under each section. Points on the score card will be as follows:

INTRODUCTION 10 points

• Did the introduction create interest in the subject?
• Was the introduction short and to the point?

ORGANIZATION 25 points

• Was only one main idea presented?
• Did the discussion relate directly to the step as it was shown?
• Was each step shown or illustrated just as it should be done in an actual situation?
• Could the audience see each step and/or visual aid?
• Were materials and equipment carefully selected, neatly arranged, and well organized?
• Were charts and posters used if and when needed?
• Were key points of each step stressed?

CONTENT AND ACCURACY 25 points

• Were facts and information accurate?
• Was there enough information?
• Were approved practices used?
• Was credit given to sources of information, if appropriate?
• Was content appropriately related to the horse industry?

STAGE PRESENCE 10 points

• Was the presenter neat and appropriately dressed for the subject of the presentation?
• Did the presenter speak directly to and look at the audience?
• Was the presentation too fast or too slow?

DELIVERY 15 points

• Did the presenter appear to enjoy giving the presentation?
• Did the presenter have good voice control?
• Were all words pronounced correctly?
• If notes were used, did this detract from the speech?
• Did the presenter seem to choose words at the time they were spoken? (Avoid a memorized presentation.)
• Did the presenters work together as a team?

EFFECT ON AUDIENCE 5 points

• Did the audience show interest in the presentation?
• Could the audience go home and carry out the idea?

SUMMARY 10 points

• Was the summary short and interesting?
• Were the key points briefly reviewed?
• Did the summary properly wrap up the presentation?
• Could the presenter handle questions easily?

Horse Public Speaking

Junior and Senior entries must be emailed to Dean Jousan (dean.jousan@msstate.edu) by Friday, March 20, 2020. The contests will be held on Saturday, March 28, on the MSU campus in Starkville. More details will be sent via email.

Eligibility Rules

1. This is an individual contest.
2. Counties are invited to enter as many contestants as deemed necessary.
3. Participants may be selected by any procedure that a county deems appropriate.
4. Contestants must be enrolled in 4-H in the county they represent.

Contest Rules

1. Speeches and presentations should be original and constructed and delivered by 4-H’ers. Any form of plagiarism is strictly prohibited. Plagiarism can include, but is not limited to: copying parts of a speech or presentation previously presented by another youth or individual; using text, phrases, photos, or diagrams from an article, video, book, movie, or other published work without giving credit to the author. Competitor’s resource citation should be specific, accurate, and honest. If contest officials confirm plagiarism, the contestant will automatically be placed last, with a notation on the scorecard to reflect such infraction.
2. No coaching from parents or coaches during the speech. Once the individual has started their speech, they may not receive assistance from any coach, parent, audience member, or other person. The penalty for violating this rule is disqualification. The subject matter must pertain to the horse industry. Speeches not appropriately related to the horse industry can be disqualified at the discretion of the judge(s).
3. No visual aids may be used, including the use of handouts such as bibliographies and pamphlets. Contestants will be disqualified for using any visual aid, including handouts, before, during, or after the speech.
4. Contestants may use notes. However, excessive use of notes may be counted against the contestant. This will be at the discretion of the judges.
5. A public address system will not be used, but a podium may be provided.
6. During the competition, the contestants may introduce themselves by name, county, and speech topic.
7. Senior speeches should be 7-10 minutes in length. Three points will be deducted from the total score on each judge’s score sheet for every minute (or fraction of a minute) under 7 minutes or over 10 minutes. After the individual has been introduced by the superintendent, the time will start once the contestant begins to speak.
8. Junior speeches should be 3-5 minutes in length. Three points will be deducted from the total score on each judge’s score sheet for every minute (or fraction of a minute) under 3 minutes or over 5 minutes. After the individual has been introduced by the superintendent, the time will start once the contestant begins to speak.
9. Contestants should cite their major reference materials at the end of the competition. This time will not be counted in the allotted time.
10. Only the judge(s) may ask questions of the contestant. Question time will not be counted in the allotted time. The contestant should repeat the question before answering it.
11. Contestant order will be determined by a random drawing and announced prior to the contest.
12. Ties will be broken by: first, the judges’ accumulated delivery score; second, the judges’ accumulated organization score; and third, content and accuracy scores.
13. For educational purposes, the management may video tape all speeches with individual consent.
14. Judges will consider the questions listed under each section. Points on the score card will be as follows:

INTRODUCTION 10 points

• Did the introduction create interest in the subject?
• Was the introduction short and to the point?

ORGANIZATION 25 points

• Were the main points easy to follow?
• Were the main points arranged in the best order?
• Were sentences short and easy to understand?
• Was the speech interesting?

CONTENT AND ACCURACY 20 points

• Were the facts and information accurate?
• Was there enough information concerning the subject?
• Was credit given to sources of information, if appropriate?
• Was content appropriately related to the horse industry?

STAGE PRESENCE 15 points

• Was the speaker neat and appropriately dressed?
• Did the speaker talk directly to and look at the audience?
• Was the speaker’s posture erect but not stiff?
• Did the speaker seem relaxed and at ease?

DELIVERY 20 points

• Did the speaker have appropriate voice control?
• Were all words pronounced correctly?
• If notes were used, did this detract from the speech?
• Did the speaker seem to choose words at the time they were spoken? (Avoid a delivery that seems read or memorized.)

GENERAL 10 points

• Did the speaker convey to the audience a sense of wanting to communicate?
• Did the speech reflect the thoughts and personality of the speaker?

CONCLUSION 10 points

• Was the conclusion short and interesting?
• Did the conclusion properly wrap up the speech?
• Could the speaker handle questions easily?

Horse Judging

Junior and Senior entries must be emailed to Dean Jousan (dean.jousan@msstate.edu) by Friday, March 20, 2020. The contests will be held on Saturday, March 28, on the MSU campus in Starkville. More details will be sent via email.

Contest Rules

1. A team may have three or four members; when four are entered, the three highest overall scores will make up the team totals.
2. All contestants will report to the contest site where they will receive full instructions and be given placing cards. All contestants will remain with the assigned group throughout the contest.
3. While the contest is in progress, there will be no conferring between the contestants and anyone else except as directed by the contest superintendents or their representatives.
4. No cell phones or other mobile electronic devices will be permitted in the judging contest or reasons contest areas.
5. Contestants are responsible for their own writing instruments and notepads for the purpose of taking notes for reasons classes.
6. Three to five halter classes will be judged, and contestants will give oral reasons on two to three of the classes.
7. Three to five performance classes will be judged, and contestants will give oral reasons on two to three of the classes. These performance classes will be selected from Western Pleasure, Reining, Western Riding, Showmanship, Hunter Under Saddle, Horsemanship, Hunt Seat Equitation, Trail, Ranch Riding, Ranch Trail, and Hunter Hack.
8. Juniors who compete in the state horse judging contest will judge four halter classes and four performance classes and give oral reasons on one halter and one performance class.
9. The animals and showmen will be designated by numbers 1–4 and numbered from left to right as viewed from the rear.
10. Horses will not be handled by the contestants, but time will be provided in halter classes for close inspection and to observe the horses at a walk and trot.

Hippology

Junior and Senior entries must be emailed to Dean Jousan (dean.jousan@msstate.edu) by Friday, March 20, 2020. The stations, exam/slides, and team problem phases of Hippology will be held on Friday evening, March 27. The judging phase will be held on Saturday, March 28. All phases of Hippology will take place on the MSU campus in Starkville. More details will be sent via email.

Objectives

The primary objective of the Hippology contest is to provide a friendly but competitive opportunity for youth enrolled in 4-H to demonstrate the breadth of their knowledge and understanding of equine science and management, particularly the practical application of this knowledge and skill. This contest is designed to generate new friendships and be a rewarding experience for the contestants.

Rules and Regulations

Contestants and Eligibility

1. Counties are invited to enter two junior and two senior teams for the 2020 contest. Teams consist of three or four members. In four-member teams, all will compete, but the member receiving the lowest overall score will be automatically declared the alternate. The scores of the alternate will not be included in any of the team totals but will be considered in making all individual awards. Teams consisting of three members will have no alternate, and all members’ scores will count in determining individual and team awards. Juniors will compete in an abbreviated version of the hippology contest and will not present a team problem.
2. Teams may be selected by any means deemed appropriate by the county they represent and must be certified as eligible by the county 4-H leader.
3. Contestants must have been at least 14, but not over 19, years of age by January 1 of the current year.
4. Contestants must be enrolled in 4-H during the current year in the county they are representing.
5. Reference material: All the information covered in this contest may be found in one or more of the following publications:

EQUUS Magazine, glossary only, from April 2019 to March 2020

Lewis Feeding and Care of the Horse (Second Edition) by Lon, Lewis, Williams, and Wilkins

351 West Camden St. Baltimore, MD 21201-2436 (800) 638-0672

HIH Horse Industry Handbooks (First Edition plus added inserts) by American Youth Horse Council (junior and senior reference)

1 Gainer Road, McDonald, NM 88262

info@ayhc.com

817.320.2005

http://www.ayhc.com/shop

HS Horse Smarts by American Youth Horse Council (senior reference)

1 Gainer Road, McDonald, NM 88262

info@ayhc.com

817.320.2005

http://www.ayhc.com/shop

Equus EQUUS Illustrated Handbook of Equine Anatomy, EQUUS Illustrated Handbook Vol. 2

Grains, forages, and feed preparations used in the contest will be representative of feeds used in horse rations.

Parker Equine Science (Fourth edition) by Rick Parker; ISBN-13: 9781111138776; Published January 2012

The Contest

Examination phase (approximately 200 points)

This phase of the contest will include

1. A written exam.
2. Projected slides to be identified according to breed, color, color pattern, activity, proper appointments, etc.
3. Anatomy, which may include external, skeletal, internal organs, parts of the gastrointestinal tract, male and female reproductive organs, detailed anatomy of the foot, and detailed anatomy of the lower limbs.

Station phase (approximately 200 points)

This phase will consist of a series of stations or tables where contestants will respond to the requirements of each station. Members will be allowed 2 minutes at each station. The following are examples of stations that may be used:

1. Identification of
a) Various types of saddles (actual or pictured) and parts of saddles.
b) Tack, bits, bridles, horseshoes, and parts of shoes; tools and equipment, and assembly of specific parts of various pieces of equipment; grains and forages used in equine rations, including various forms or methods of preparation.
c) Internal and external parasites based on actual samples, pictures, life cycles, charts, and/or damage caused.
d) Blemishes and examples of unsoundness.
e) Ages of equines based on teeth.
2. Use of pulse rate, respiration rate, temperature, dehydration, anemia, etc., to assess horse health.
3. Measurements such as, but not limited to, wither height, shoe size, girth, collar size, gullet width, seat length of saddle, etc., may be required.

Judging phase (approximately 200 points)

Contestants will be required to place at least four classes, made up of two conformation and two performance classes. Every effort will be made to use the same horses that are being used in the judging contest, with placing to be simultaneous with contestants in the judging contest, with the same official placing and cuts that apply to the judging contest. In extreme emergency, pictorial, video, and/or movie classes may be used, in which case they would be especially prepared for the event.

Team problems (approximately 200 points)

All teams will be presented with the same problem(s). Each team will have equal time to discuss the problem before presenting an oral solution or series of suggested procedures related to the problem. Each member of each team is encouraged to contribute to the oral presentation. A bonus score will be given to teams that have complete team participation in the oral presentation. Evaluation will be based on the team’s understanding of the problem and the soundness of the logic used in making the oral response. The official may ask questions of any or all of the team members to clarify the presentation. Examples of possible team problems might include the following:

1. Balancing a horse’s ration.
2. Farm management recommendations for specific horse operations (such as breeding, training, boarding, nursery, lay-up, etc.).
3. Considerations for the establishment of a new horse facility (stable to be used for a specific purpose).
4. Recommendations for selecting, locating, and purchasing horses for specific uses.
5. Behavior problems (causes, management of, and corrections).
6. Training and conditioning programs (equipment, schedules, methods, nutrition, and problem avoidance).
7. Breeding and/or leasing contracts (specific clauses for insurance, liability, payments, care, termination, transport, etc.).
8. Teaching lessons in horse management (specific subject to be announced) to a group of 9- to 11-year-old beginner 4-H’ers: where, how long, how much information, hands-on experiences, reinforcement, testing, and evaluation.
9. Explanation of use and assembly of specific equipment.
10. Demonstrating skill or ability to use specific equipment.

Team problem scores will not be included in determining the rank of individuals in the contest but will be added to the team scores of the other three phases to determine the overall team standing.

Awards

1. Awards will be presented to the top three individuals in the examination phase, station phase, judging phase, and overall.
2. Each member of the top three teams in the examination phase, station phase, judging phase, team problem phase, and overall will receive awards.

Tie Breaking

All ties—overall, individual, and team—will be broken using the following sequence:

1. Examination scores
2. Station scores
3. Judging scores

Ties within any phase are to be broken using the overall score first and then the same sequence as above. If further tie-breaking is needed, the scores at each station, in the above order, may be used.


M2322 (POD-02-20)

Revised by Dean Jousan, PhD, Associate Extension Professor and 4-H Livestock Specialist, and Clay Cavinder, PhD, Professor and Extension Horse Specialist, Animal & Dairy Sciences.

Copyright 2020 by Mississippi State University. All rights reserved. This publication may be copied and distributed without alteration for nonprofit educational purposes provided that credit is given to the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

Produced by Agricultural Communications.

Mississippi State University is an equal opportunity institution. Discrimination in university employment, programs, or activities based on race, color, ethnicity, sex, pregnancy, religion, national origin, disability, age, sexual orientation, genetic information, status as a U.S. veteran, or any other status protected by applicable law is prohibited. Questions about equal opportunity programs or compliance should be directed to the Office of Compliance and Integrity, 56 Morgan Avenue, P.O. 6044, Mississippi State, MS 39762, (662) 325-5839.

Extension Service of Mississippi State University, cooperating with U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published in furtherance of Acts of Congress, May 8 and June 30, 1914. GARY B. JACKSON, Director

The Mississippi State University Extension Service is working to ensure all web content is accessible to all users. If you need assistance accessing any of our content, please email the webteam or call 662-325-2262.

Select Your County Office

Authors

Portrait of Dr. Dean Jousan
Associate Extension Professor
Extension 4-H Livestock Specialist

Your Extension Experts

Portrait of Dr. Dean Jousan
Associate Extension Professor
Extension 4-H Livestock Specialist
Portrait of Dr. Paula Threadgill
Assc Dir, FCS & 4H & Ext Prof
Associate Director FCS/4H

Related Publications

Publication Number: M2351
Publication Number: P0852

Pages