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Seed or Transplants

As with vegetables, there are advantages to setting out some plants as transplants and others from seed. Single-potted annual plants or packs of annuals containing several transplants are more expensive than seed. However, the instant effect created by setting out plants is irresistible to most gardeners.

Sowing seed directly into the garden soil is a time-honored ritual that rewards a little work and patience with great returns. The extra time involved is offset by savings in initial cost. Also, you can get more variety at less expense from seed than from transplants.

Many species of annual flowers have improved varieties, with increased heat tolerance, disease resistance, and other improvements. Instead of relying on the same tried and true varieties each year, look for those that have won the All-America Selection award. In addition to the dozens of varieties found on seed racks, mail-order companies provide gardeners with colorful catalogs full of many exciting annuals, including the newest varieties. Ordering seed through the mail has a peculiar excitement all its own, and the catalogs themselves are a wealth of information on planting and caring for unusual plants.

Annual flowers, whether grown from seed or transplants, are all handled the same in the garden. Summer annuals are planted in the early spring, after soil temperatures have risen and danger of frost has passed. Winter annuals are planted early enough in the fall to allow time for toughening up before frost.

Set plants shallow, with the top of the roots just under the surface of the soil. If transplants are grown in pots made of compressed peat moss, crumble the top edge of the peat pot away from the plant so that it will not act as a wick pulling water away from the roots. Pinching off small flowers on brand-new transplants may be hard to do, but it will promote fast new growth and more flowers sooner.

You can have continual bloom the entire summer through some occasional maintenance. As the flowers begin to fade, remove them before seeds are formed. The plants in turn generate new flowers to try again to produce seed. Annual beds maintained for cut flowers will also send up new flower stems to replace those removed for floral arrangements.

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Publication Number: IS0204
Publication Number: p3121
Publication Number: P3099
Publication Number: P3115

News

Purple viola flowers grow in a container.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens November 20, 2017

The last two weeks, I’ve told you about two of my top three cool-season flowering bedding plants. Today, I’m going to complete the trifecta with another plant everyone should have in their landscape: the viola.

Violas may have smaller flowers than their cousin, the pansy, but they’re maybe even tougher and more tolerant of cold, winter weather than pansies. These plants are beautiful massed in landscape beds, and they can be great performers all the way to Easter.

A close-up of white and pink dianthus blooms.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens November 13, 2017

Even though the air is still warm in many parts of Mississippi, it’s time to plant annual winter color. Last week, I wrote about pansies being a great color choice. Another sure-fire pick is dianthus.

A close-up of a pink pansy with a dark maroon blotch in the center.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens November 6, 2017

These days, I have to wear my hoodie sweatshirts and long pants for anything below 60 degrees. But the falling temperatures also signal something great: racks and racks of great, cool-season color as pansies fill local garden centers.

A head of cabbage grows in the center of a gorgeous red cabbage plant.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens October 30, 2017

This year, I’m getting an early start on my ornamental kale and cabbage planting for the fall.

A couple of weeks ago, I found these plants being marketed in variety packs, so I picked up a selection of kale and cabbage. What an easy way to select plants for your landscape this weekend.

Confederate rose is an heirloom plant that blooms prolifically in late summer and fall.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens October 23, 2017
I have weekly favorite plants, as you may know, and one of my favorites started blooming in earnest over the last couple of weeks. The sheer number of flowers on the Confederate rose makes this plant a must-have in our Mississippi landscapes.

Confederate rose is sometimes called Cotton rose and Cotton rosemallow. Despite the references to cotton, this plant is actually a hibiscus that originated in Asia.

Watch

Pansy and Viola
Southern Gardening

Pansy and Viola

Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 2:00am
Toucan Canna
Southern Gardening

Toucan Canna

Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 2:45am
Fall Lantana
Southern Gardening

Fall Lantana

Sunday, November 5, 2017 - 2:45am
Naked Ladies
Southern Gardening

Naked Ladies

Sunday, October 29, 2017 - 2:00am
Killer Cool Color
Southern Gardening

Killer Cool Color

Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 2:00am

Listen

Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 2:45am
Monday, November 20, 2017 - 2:45am
Friday, November 17, 2017 - 2:45am
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 2:45am
Monday, November 13, 2017 - 2:45am

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