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Perennial Flowering Plants in Mississippi

Perennials are plants that live for several years and often require two or more years from seed to flower. There is a renewed interest in herbaceous perennials because they need less maintenance, less water, and fewer pesticides than annuals. Many gardeners include flowering bulbs and ornamental grasses in this category. Once prominent in many landscapes, these enduring plants are being rediscovered for their dependable seasonal effects.

Unlike trees and woody shrubs, which are also perennials, herbaceous perennials are those that appear to die down part of the year, only to emerge again the following season from underground roots, stems, bulbs, or rhizomes. The simple term "perennial" is commonly used when referring to herbaceous perennials.

The daylily Suburban Nancy GaylePerennials are easily used as ground covers, mixed with annuals, grown in containers, and used as accents or specimen plants. Many perennials are short bloomers and are best mixed with others that bloom at different times or included with other landscape plants as part of an overall design. Other perennial plants, such as ferns and monkey grass, are more noted for their foliage than their flowers. Inclusion of these plants adds interest and creates seasonal color or texture to the landscape.

Favorite perennials, including many herbs and native wildflowers, have long been shared by gardeners and sold through garden centers and mail-order nurseries. Many are treasured by gardeners as heirloom plants and have proven themselves to be hardy enough to withstand our weather and climate extremes, often with little care. Others are exciting new discoveries or hybrids and may take several years to prove themselves in Mississippi gardens. However, there are a good many perennial plants that simply do not survive for more than a year or two in our warm, humid climate, just as some of our favorites will not survive long in colder areas of the United States.

Most annuals are planted in spring and are killed by frost in the fall. However, some, including pansies, ornamental cabbage, and dill are tolerant of our winters and are best planted in the fall for color throughout the winter. These are usually killed by the heat of early summer.

Some annuals, such as gomphrena, cosmos, and coreopsis reseed themselves, yielding several years of pleasure with minimal care. Annuals come in a variety of colors, heights, and textures, and their uses are almost unlimited. Unbeatable in masses of solid or mixed colors, annuals are also very effective in small groups or used to soften lines and accent borders.

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News

Saucer magnolias bloom before the leaves emerge, making their huge flowers the main attraction. (Photo by MSU Extension/Gary Bachman)
Filed Under: Flower Gardens February 19, 2018

I came to a conclusion after a series of events reminded me that spring is really close.

Small red berries and green leaves line a distylium branch.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens February 12, 2018

Distylium Vintage Jade is an exciting new plant that brings pizazz to the traditional role of foundation planting.

A arrangement of pink, orange and yellow zinnias sit on a stool against a black background.
Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens February 1, 2018

Individuals interested in floral design can attend a live demonstration to learn about new arrangement techniques using Mississippi products March 8.
Jim DelPrince, horticulture specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, will show attendees how to use materials from their landscapes to create arrangements in Mississippi-made pottery.

White flower pots containing green lemongrass are lined up on the ground.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens January 29, 2018

Last week, I focused on the 2018 Mississippi Medallion Winner fancy leaf kale. This week, let’s look at a second 2018 winner: lemongrass.

Grayish-purple kale plants are displayed, each with light purple centers.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens January 22, 2018

Garden catalogs start piling up by the front door at this time of year, and our two recent cold spells gave me time to look at them. I’ve had the best time flipping through these catalogs and dreaming about all the new plants I’m going to grow this year.

Success Stories

brightly colored wooden fence and gate
Community, Family Dynamics, Flower Gardens, Youth Gardening Extension Matters: Volume 3 Number 3

Before she became the Hancock County Youth Court judge, Elise Deano was a school teacher. She jokes that she became a lawyer because she taught school, but Deano wants to make sure young people get an opportunity to turn their lives around.

Watch

Wisteria
Southern Gardening

Wisteria

Sunday, February 18, 2018 - 7:00am
Indoor Plants
Southern Gardening

Indoor Plants

Sunday, February 11, 2018 - 7:00am
Gary the Godfather
Southern Gardening

Gary the Godfather

Sunday, February 4, 2018 - 7:00am
Winter Wonders
Southern Gardening

Winter Wonders

Sunday, January 28, 2018 - 7:00am
Crape Murder
Southern Gardening

Crape Murder

Sunday, January 21, 2018 - 7:15am

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