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News Filed Under Timber Harvest

April 13, 2017 - Filed Under: Natural Resources, Forest Economics, Forest Management, Timber Harvest

RAYMOND, Miss. -- New landowners can learn about managing timberland for profit during a five-part short course in May.

Forestland as an Investment will be offered May 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30 at the Mississippi State University Extension Service office in Forrest County. It starts at 6 p.m. and ends at 8 p.m. each night. The Extension office is located at 952 Sullivan Drive in Hattiesburg.

July 8, 2016 - Filed Under: Forestry, Timber Harvest

ABERDEEN, Miss. -- Mississippi’s tree farmer of the year is now a regional finalist for the national version of the same award.

Bobby Watkins manages Coontail Farm, a 240-acre loblolly pine plot in Aberdeen used for timber production. The area also has a wildlife-friendly habitat for hunting and fishing.

February 12, 2016 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Landowners who manage pine plantations can simplify tree thinning by using a new app created by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

Guide to Thinning Southern Pines, or Pine Thin, was developed to allow landowners and foresters to quickly determine if a pine stand needs thinning by taking advantage of smartphone technology.

James Henderson, associate Extension forestry professor, said thinning is a way to maintain timberland growth rates.

Tree farmer Cecil Chambliss thought Hurricane Katrina put him out of business, but 10 years later, he has changed his management practices and improved production on his Forrest County farm by replanting with longleaf and slash pine, which are more resistant to high winds than loblolly pine. (Submitted photo)
August 27, 2015 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- As bleak as the outlook seemed for Mississippi’s forestry industry in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the state’s second largest agricultural commodity is slowly recovering.

Housing starts across the country climbed in July to their highest rates in almost eight years, but current overall average stumpage prices in Mississippi are hovering near where they were at this time in 2014 because of a timber surplus. (File photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kevin Hudson)
August 21, 2015 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Mississippi’s timber industry is holding steady this year from 2014 as both the U.S. housing market and the demand for lumber continue to improve gradually.

State average stumpage prices for hardwood sawtimber declined sharply in the second fiscal quarter of 2015 from the first quarter, while pine sawtimber prices increased. Hardwood sawtimber is down compared to a year ago, while pine sawtimber is slightly higher.

Randy Rousseau, a Mississippi State University Extension forestry professor in the Forest and Wildlife Research Center, examines pine seedlings in an MSU greenhouse Feb. 18, 2015, in Starkville, Mississippi. He administers a program designed to encourage landowners to invest in better seedlings so they can see for themselves that the results are worth the much higher initial cost. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
April 16, 2015 - Filed Under: Environment, Forestry, Timber Harvest

By Bonnie Coblentz
MSU Ag Communications

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- A forest geneticist at Mississippi State University is encouraging landowners to invest in better seedlings, and he’s giving them free trees so they can see for themselves that the results are worth the much higher initial cost.

September 15, 2014 - Filed Under: Forestry, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- The newest technology and machinery used to advance the South’s timber industry will be demonstrated Sept. 19-20 at the Mid-South Forestry Equipment Show.

The event will run from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Held at the John W. Starr Memorial Forest off of Highway 25 south of Starkville, the show is sponsored by Mississippi State University’s College of Forest Resources, Hatton-Brown Publishers Inc., the Mississippi Loggers Association and the Mississippi Forestry Association.

Guy Ray, president of Pleasant Lake Plantation, looks over grasslands on the property on July 31, 2014. He has implemented numerous conservation land management practices to make the Leflore County, Mississippi, plantation a model of sustainability and functionality. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kevin Hudson)
August 11, 2014 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Farming, Timber Harvest, Natural Resources

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Conservation land management practices have made the Pleasant Lake Plantation in Leflore County a model of sustainability and functionality.

Pleasant Lake has about 1,700 acres near Greenwood. The plantation includes about 500 acres in row crop production, 600 acres in timber, 110 acres in Conservation Reserve Program grassland, along with a 50-acre lake and lowlands that are prone to flooding.

Mississippi's timber industry may see increasing demand for Southern pine lumber as new home construction rates continue to rise. This pine was growing in Monroe County on Sept. 12, 2013. (File photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
April 11, 2014 - Filed Under: Forest Economics, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Markets for Mississippi’s sawtimber and pulpwood are bouncing back from the economic recession, but the industry is not improving across the board.

“Slowly but surely, markets for sawtimber are beginning to grow again after the sharp declines seen after the collapse of the U.S. housing market and the ensuing recession,” said James Henderson, associate Extension professor of forestry at Mississippi State University. “But the closing of the International Paper mill in Courtland, Ala. will have an impact on north Mississippi’s pulpwood markets.”

Researchers at Mississippi State University have released a free software program that will help foresters and landowners manage bottomland hardwood timber, such as this stand in southwest Mississippi. (Photo courtesy of Patrick Glass)
April 8, 2014 - Filed Under: Forestry, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi State University scientists have created a new software program to help foresters and landowners manage hardwood timber.

Emily Schultz and Tom Matney, forestry professors in the MSU Forest and Wildlife Research Center, developed the software and user’s guide based on 33 years of research.

The free software provides expected yields and future growth values for the red oak-sweetgum forest mixture that is widely distributed across Mississippi river bottoms.

Clyde Brown, an agricultural technician with Mississippi State University's Forest and Wildlife Research Center, stands on a fire lane to monitor a prescribed fire on a cut-over in Oktibbeha County. After the site was clear cut and an aerial application of herbicide was applied, it was burned and replanted in pines. (Photo by MSU Forest and Wildlife Research Center)
September 25, 2013 - Filed Under: Environment, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Landowners interested in maximizing the value of their investment need to plan for proper site preparation when replanting trees after harvesting timber.

John Kushla, a forestry specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service and MSU’s Forest and Wildlife Research Center, said this preparation involves manipulating the site to increase the survival and growth of seedlings. Proper site preparation also makes tree planting or seeding more efficient.

May 24, 2013 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Evidence of a healthy national economy may be found in the strength of the timber industry.

Forestry is a billion-dollar industry in Mississippi and the state’s second-largest agricultural commodity. A depressed national economy in recent years had negative impacts on housing construction and furniture manufacturing, which hurt the forestry sector, but industry experts are seeing signs that a recovery is at hand.

March 1, 2013 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi State University is offering a free webinar to help those in the timber business understand the changes being made this summer to lumber measurements and standards.

Southern Pine Design Values will be offered free online March 18 from 9 a.m. to noon. Registration is free, and only those registered will receive a link to the webinar. Register at http://www.cfr.msstate.edu/workshops/pine_design.

Forestry is Mississippi's third-largest agricultural commodity in 2012, with a preliminary year-end harvest value estimated at $1.03 billion, an 8 percent increase from 2011. (MSU Ag Communications file photo/Scott Corey)
December 13, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Forestry, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE – An 8 percent increase in a billion-dollar industry is significant, but timber still fell from its long-held second place spot on Mississippi’s agricultural commodity list.

James Henderson, assistant forestry professor with Mississippi State University’s Extension Service, is estimating the 2012 value of Mississippi forest products to be $1.03 billion, compared with $957 million the previous year. Final numbers using more complete data will replace the estimate in February.

January 30, 2012 - Filed Under: Forest Economics, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The Mississippi State University Extension Service will offer timber tax workshops Feb. 28 in Raymond, March 1 in Coffeeville and March 29 in Oxford.

Landowners, certified accountants, consulting foresters and loggers are invited to participate in the Income Taxes and Family Forest short course. Topics include changes to capital gains tax law, basics of basis, record keeping, timber sales income, recovery of reforestation costs, casualty losses, strategic tax planning, tax forms and information sources.

Kudzu covers large tracts of land from eastern Texas to the East Coast and as far north as Maryland. (Photo by Kat Lawrence)
December 1, 2011 - Filed Under: Environment, Timber Harvest, Invasive Plants

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Kudzu can grow a foot per day, and today it covers nearly seven million acres in the South.

Now listed as a federal noxious weed, kudzu was imported to prevent soil erosion and to feed livestock. The semi-woody plant covers large tracts of land from eastern Texas to the East Coast and as far north as Maryland. Kudzu climbs, covers and eventually kills trees, destroying the timber-producing value of these lands. It reduces land productivity by millions of dollars yearly.

August 18, 2011 - Filed Under: Forestry, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Pine beetles are a threat when trees are stressed, but a cost-share program can help Mississippi private forest landowners keep trees healthy.

Andy Londo, forestry professor with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said proactive management activities, such as periodic thinning, can increase overall forest health and reduce the threat of a Southern pine beetle outbreak.

The tornadoes that tore through the state this past spring damaged about 74,000 acres of forestland in 22 counties, racking up timber losses of more than $30 million. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
August 11, 2011 - Filed Under: Disaster Response, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The tornadoes that ripped through Mississippi this April damaged about 74,000 acres of forestland in 22 counties, racking up timber losses of more than $30 million. Most of that timber was uninsured, but the results of a survey conducted by Mississippi State University may help change that trend.

Steve Bullard was one of those uninsured. He owns 100 acres of timber in Webster County — 40 acres of 26-year-old plantation pine and 60 acres of mixed pine and hardwood.

Pine bark beetles have attacked this stressed pine tree, burrowing under the bark and killing the tree. (file photo)
July 21, 2011 - Filed Under: Forestry, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE – With most of the state needing rain and south Mississippi under exceptional drought, landowners are watching as their trees deal with stress.

Glenn Hughes, forestry professor with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said dead or dying trees, both pine and hardwood, are becoming a common sight in south Mississippi. This concerns both homeowners and forest landowners.

May 26, 2011 - Filed Under: Forestry, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Financial incentives for property owners to plant and manage their lands for timber production have been around since the 1930s, but many private landowners in Mississippi do not know about them.

These incentives, called cost-share programs, were developed to offset the initial costs for site preparation, tree planting and forest stand improvement.

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