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News Filed Under Invasive Plants

Cogongrass is a hardy, fast-growing invasive weed that is spreading across the Southeast. Mississippi State University Extension Service weed scientist John Byrd said it has no value as forage and displaces native ecosystems. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kevin Hudson)
August 21, 2015 - Filed Under: Invasive Plants

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Cogongrass was introduced to Mississippi 100 years ago as a new forage crop, but it is now an invasive weed landowners and managers are trying to destroy.

John Byrd, weed scientist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said it was thought that this perennial grass had potential to benefit rural families.

Winter is one of the easiest times of the year to identify cogongrass, which many researchers have classified among the worst weeds in the world. Herbicide treatments applied in the early spring are instrumental in eliminating the noxious weed. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kevin Hudson)
February 6, 2015 - Filed Under: Weed Control for Crops, Invasive Plants

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Cogongrass will not be in bloom for at least another two months, but now is the time for people who suspect they may have this weed on their property to find out for sure.

The Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station hosts small-plot research on the Mississippi State University campus so researchers can evaluate residual control of glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass to determine the best practices for combating the weed. (Photo submitted)
February 2, 2015 - Filed Under: Weed Control for Crops, Invasive Plants

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- With spring right around the corner, experts say now is the time for producers to control weeds that have developed resistance to commonly used herbicides.

Jason Bond, associate research and Extension professor at the Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville, said glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass is a problem weed for producers in Mississippi.

Invasive cogongrass is taking over many Mississippi fields, including these in Clay County. Cogongrass is an exotic plant species from Asia that has aggressively expanded its range in the Southeastern United States and is difficult to control. (Photo courtesy of Rocky Lemus)
September 26, 2014 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Weed Control for Crops, Weed Control for Forages, Environment, Invasive Plants

Ray Iglay, Certified Wildlife Biologist
MSU Department of Wildlife Fisheries and Aquaculture

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Driving along Mississippi highways is always best when the surrounding landscapes capture the driver’s imagination. Our road systems serve as scenic byways showcasing nature’s beauty.

Mississippi State University weed scientists are leading the fight against glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass, such as this growing in a production corn field in Washington County in early spring 2013. (Photo by MSU Delta Research and Extension Center/Jason Bond)
October 7, 2013 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Weed Control for Crops, Invasive Plants

STONEVILLE -- Mississippi State University scientists are leading the charge in the fight against glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass with a research-based plan of attack.

Jason Bond, a weed scientist at the MSU Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville, said Mississippi was the first state to discover Italian ryegrass that cannot be controlled with glyphosate, a common herbicide originally known as Round-up, in a crop situation. The weed has spread quickly since it arrived.

May 23, 2013 - Filed Under: Soybeans, Invasive Plants

STONEVILLE – Soybean growers and consultants will benefit from an upcoming tour that teaches control measures for a springtime weed that plagues fields every year.

Mississippi State University’s Delta Research and Extension Center will host a yellow nutsedge discussion from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. May 31 in the B.F. Smith Auditorium. Following a brief seminar, participants will travel a short distance to a trial area that has been established to demonstrate various tactics for controlling this weed, both before and after soybean plants have emerged.

Populations of glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass, such as this weed photographed in Washington County in 2010, have been found in 31 Mississippi counties. (Photo by MAFES/Tom Eubank)
November 29, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Weed Control for Crops, Weed Control for Forages, Invasive Plants

STONEVILLE – Research is backing producers’ intense efforts this fall to attack glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass using a variety of methods in attempts to limit the damage this troublesome weed can cause.

In 2005, Italian ryegrass resistant to the commonly used herbicide glyphosate was first identified in the state. Since then, it has been found in 31 Mississippi counties and is widespread throughout the Delta. This glyphosate-resistant weed emerges in the fall and grows throughout winter and early spring.

May 24, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Invasive Plants

STONEVILLE – Farmers can learn more about controlling Palmer amaranth, universally hated and commonly known as pigweed, at an upcoming field day.

Mississippi State University’s Delta Research and Extension Center will host a Pigweed Field Day from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on June 14.

Kudzu covers large tracts of land from eastern Texas to the East Coast and as far north as Maryland. (Photo by Kat Lawrence)
December 1, 2011 - Filed Under: Environment, Timber Harvest, Invasive Plants

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Kudzu can grow a foot per day, and today it covers nearly seven million acres in the South.

Now listed as a federal noxious weed, kudzu was imported to prevent soil erosion and to feed livestock. The semi-woody plant covers large tracts of land from eastern Texas to the East Coast and as far north as Maryland. Kudzu climbs, covers and eventually kills trees, destroying the timber-producing value of these lands. It reduces land productivity by millions of dollars yearly.

June 9, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Weed Control for Crops, Weed Control for Forages, Invasive Plants, Weed Control for Lawn and Garden

MISSISSIPPI STATE – State officials are asking for the public’s help in stopping the spread of cogongrass, one of the world’s worst weeds, which has invaded 62 of Mississippi’s 82 counties.

The Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce-Bureau of Plant Industry is asking anyone who spots this invasive grass to report the sighting by calling (662) 325-3390. The problem is severe enough that a Mississippi Forestry Commission assistance program is available in 19 counties to help landowners get rid of the weed.

February 11, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Invasive Plants

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi farmers are a few years into the fight against glyphosate-resistant weeds, a problem that is the focus of a March 10 field day in Stoneville.

Producers will take a close look at ways to manage herbicide resistance in the Glyphosate-Resistant Ryegrass Field Day at Mississippi State University’s Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. at the Capps Center, and the field day concludes with lunch. The program will move indoors if there is bad weather.

August 5, 2010 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Corn, Cotton, Weed Control for Crops, Invasive Plants

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Weeds that have developed resistance to the commonly used herbicide glyphosate are forcing row crop farmers to change their production methods to battle the problem.

Five weeds found in Mississippi have developed resistance to glyphosate, the active ingredient found in Roundup herbicide. Since 1996, this broad spectrum herbicide has been used extensively as an easy and effective way to control weeds in row crops that have been genetically modified to withstand the chemical.

August 5, 2010 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Weed Control for Crops, Invasive Plants

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi is one of six states participating in a study monitoring the problem of glyphosate-resistant weeds and trying to prevent any more from developing.

Roundup is the trade name for glyphosate, a powerful broad-spectrum herbicide that can kill a wide range of weeds in varying growth stages. Seed genetically modified to be resistant to glyphosate is known as Roundup Ready seed. With Roundup Ready cropping systems, producers can apply glyphosate across a field, killing weeds but leaving the crop undamaged.

August 5, 2010 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Weed Control for Crops, Invasive Plants

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi row crop producers are facing a growing problem, as five common weeds have developed resistance to the primary herbicide used to manage them.

Roundup is the trade name for glyphosate, a powerful broad-spectrum herbicide that can kill a wide range of weeds in varying growth stages. But by the 2010 growing season, 19 weeds worldwide had become resistant to glyphosate, and five are found in Mississippi. These weeds are horseweed, Italian ryegrass, Johnsongrass, and Palmer amaranth and waterhemp -- both species of pigweed.

September 10, 2009 - Filed Under: Environment, Invasive Plants

By Shoshana Herndon
MSU College of Forest Resources

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- The lakes of the Mississippi Delta offer numerous recreational uses throughout the year. However, too many invasive aquatic plant species can create a less-than-optimal environment for fish and people.

A project in Mississippi State University’s Forest and Wildlife Research Center is looking at two different management practices to improve the habitat and increase public use of lakes for fishing, hunting and other recreational purposes.

May 7, 2009 - Filed Under: Invasive Plants

By Patti Drapala
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Some scientists researching invasive water plants look at the direct effects of these plants and others assess different control methods.

Mississippi State University graduate student Erica Schlickeisen wanted to know about the indirect and sometimes unanticipated effects invasive plants have on water quality and microbial activity.

Cogongrass is not native to Mississippi, but the Asian import is spreading rapidly through the state, choking out native vegetation and causing problems for livestock and wildlife. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Bob Ratliff)
July 26, 2007 - Filed Under: Invasive Plants

By Andrea Cooper
MSU College of Forest Resources

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Cogongrass has spread across the southern United States since arriving as packing material in crates shipped from Asia to Mobile, Ala., in 1912. 

The invasive grass, which chokes out native plants and causes problems for livestock and wildlife, is the subject of two recent studies in Mississippi State University's College of Forest Resources.

February 24, 2005 - Filed Under: Weed Control for Crops, Invasive Plants

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Weed control is synonymous with glyphosate use to many row crop producers, but a resistant weed in the Delta is making producers change their management strategies.

John Byrd, weed scientist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said mare's tail or horseweed has become resistant to glyphosate applications in the Delta. Tennessee and Arkansas are fighting resistant strains of this weed, too, and Arkansas has just confirmed glyphosate-resistant populations of common ragweed.

Cogongrass
September 19, 2003 - Filed Under: Invasive Plants

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- A non-native weed is threatening state roadsides, pastures and forests, and while it may not spread as fast as kudzu, it is dangerously invasive.

Cogongrass is an aggressive warm-season, perennial grass that is difficult to control. It is native to southeast Asia and was accidentally introduced to the United States in 1911 at Grand Bay, Ala. It spread to other states in the 1920s as Experiment Stations evaluated it as a potential forage crop in Mississippi, Florida and Alabama.

Cogongrass
September 19, 2003 - Filed Under: Invasive Plants

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- An invasive weed with no known value has made its way across half the state and shows no signs of letting up.

Cogongrass competes with desirable grasses and wins the battle for nutrients, but it is a very poor forage. Mississippians are learning the hard way that it is very difficult to keep this grass at bay.

John Byrd, Extension weed scientist with Mississippi State University, said the weed invades low-maintenance areas or those not in cultivation. It out-competes other grasses, yet provides nothing of value.

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