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January 24, 2000 - Filed Under: Cotton

By Rebekah Ray

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Cotton may be king in the Mississippi Delta, but research at Mississippi State University is helping the white gold grow in hilly sections of the state as well.

Cotton breeding and development is conducted by Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Experiment Station breeders Dr. Ted Wallace and Dr. Roy Creech in Starkville, and Dr. John Creech at the MSU's Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville.

January 24, 2000 - Filed Under: Cotton

By Rebekah Ray

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- U.S. Highway 82, the internet and telephone wires connect a Mississippi State University father-and-son research team who work on opposite sides of Mississippi.

Both Dr. Roy Creech and his son, Dr. John Creech, are looking for ways to improve Mississippi's leading row crop, cotton. One has a lab at MSU in Starkville and the other conducts research at the Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville.

January 24, 2000 - Filed Under: Insects-Pests

By Rebekah Ray

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- A new species of termites is munching its way across the coastal South and Mississippi State University scientists have joined forces with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and several other coastal states to take aim at this intruder.

January 17, 2000 - Filed Under: Family

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Southern weddings are full of customs, but the most challenging traditions are those related to fashions.

"People in the South tend to be more conservative and traditional in their approach to weddings," said Everlyn Johnson, apparel and textiles program leader with Mississippi State University's Extension Service. "Usually, the more formal the wedding, the more we expect rules to be followed."

January 17, 2000 - Filed Under: Family

By Laura Martin

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Couples planning a short engagement should focus on simple weddings.

Sudden changes in jobs or living arrangements may prompt couples to get married within three months or less. Planning an elaborate wedding in such a short time can be difficult and expensive, but simpler weddings can be elegant and low-cost.

Nancy Freeman, Harrison County home economist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service and an experienced wedding director, suggested that couples begin by making a list of what they need to do first.

January 17, 2000 - Filed Under: Food and Health

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Quick weight loss programs capture the attention of many soon-to-be-married couples, but health experts warn the weight loss is often temporary and can even do physical harm.

With enough time, most people can safely lose the weight they want and even keep it off after the big day. Crash and fad diets often help people shed pounds rapidly, but are not recommended for health or long-term results.

January 17, 2000 - Filed Under: Family Financial Management

By Jennifer Wesson

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- The honeymoon can be the most exciting vacation a couple takesñand the most expensive.

With the average cost of today's wedding approximately $20,000, couples must be flexible and creative in planning their honeymoon to avoid financial hardships at the beginning of their marriage.

"A honeymoon does not have to wreck a budget," said Jan Lukens, consumer management consultant with Mississippi State University Extension Service. "It doesn't take a lot of money for a couple in love to have a good time."

January 17, 2000 - Filed Under: Family

By Jennifer Wesson

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Planning a wedding can be stressful for any couple, but for those who elope or choose to get married away from home, pressure from family and friends can be overwhelming.

Many factors, including the desire for simplicity, could inspire a couple to opt for a quiet wedding.

January 17, 2000 - Filed Under: Family Dynamics

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Talking about potential hot topics before the wedding helps many couples avoid marital problems that could drive them apart later.

Dr. Louise Davis, child and family development specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said preventing problems before they ever start is much better than trying to solve existing ones in a marriage.

"Preparation for marriage is vital," Davis said. "For the sake of their marriage, there are many questions couples should answer before they come to the one that ends with ëI do'."

January 10, 2000 - Filed Under: Farm Safety

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Subfreezing temperatures send many people seeking warmth any way they can, resulting in deadly house fires each winter season.

Preventing fires involving gas water heaters and flammable vapors is the emphasis of this year's Burn Awareness Week Feb. 6 through 12. According to information released online by the International Shriners, water heater and flammable vapor fires account for about 2,000 fires a year in the United States and lead to more than 300 deaths or injuries.

January 10, 2000 - Filed Under: Food Safety

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Revolutionary new food safety standards are presenting a challenge to meat companies committed to providing top quality products, so Mississippi State University is serving as a resource to help meet the new regulations.

January 10, 2000 - Filed Under: Food Safety

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Food stored for a year-end computer glitch that didn't happen now must be stored safely until used or given away, an option food banks nationwide are welcoming.

John Alford, executive director of the Mississippi Food Network in Jackson, said the charity's parent national organization, Second Harvest, has set aside Jan. 15 to Feb. 15 as a food drive for excess Y2K stockpiled food.

December 20, 1999 - Filed Under: Agriculture

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi's total value of farm and forest production in 1999 is expected to hold near the $5 billion mark despite depressed market prices and another challenging growing season for many of the state's crops.

Mississippi's total commodities, which include poultry, forestry, crops, catfish and livestock, have been estimated to have a market value of more than $4.6 billion for 1999, a decrease of about 2 percent from 1998. Increased government payments will bring the total gross receipts to just over $5 billion.

December 20, 1999 - Filed Under: Poultry

By Laura Martin

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi's poultry industry held on to the state's top agricultural spot besting last year's record value despite lower prices and decreased exports.

Poultry, the state's largest crop, should reach an estimated 1999 value of $1.55 billion, topping last year's record of $1.53 billion. It is the first and only agricultural industry in the state to top $1.5 billion in farm value.

December 20, 1999 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi's forest industry dipped in 1999 after riding a wave of record highs in 11 of the last 12 years, but maintained its seventh year with a value in excess of a billion dollars.

Mississippi timber production has a 1999 estimated value of $1.33 billion, down almost 3 percent from 1998's all-time high of $1.36 billion. Despite the downturn, its value remains above 1997 levels. Forestry continues to hold the state's No. 2 spot in value, just behind poultry.

December 20, 1999 - Filed Under: Cotton

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Cotton took a beating both in prices and yield this year, but with significantly more acreage than last year, the final numbers look a lot like 1998.

Mississippi cotton acres again broke the million mark, rising from 760,000 in 1998 to 1.18 million in 1999. Yield, however, averaged just 708 pounds an acre, a drop from 737 pounds per acre in 1998. The biggest hit came from prices, which were down 10 to 15 cents from last year.

December 20, 1999 - Filed Under: Crops

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- After enduring some of the lowest prices for their crops in recent years, Mississippi farmers are looking more to the experts for management advice for the 2000 crop as they tighten their budgets another notch.

County agricultural agents with Mississippi State University's Extension Service are advising farmers on management decisions ranging from land and variety selections to labor and pricing decisions.

December 20, 1999 - Filed Under: Farm Safety

By Laura Martin

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Starting a winter fire in a cold fireplace may present potential hazards for homeowners. As temperatures drop, the warmth of a fire may attract kids and may threaten birds who have made nests inside the chimney.

Dr. Frances Graham, a housing specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, offered a few safety tips when starting a fire at home.

December 13, 1999 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Remote Sensing Technology, Technology

By Rebekah Ray

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Research at Mississippi State University is developing new ways to apply space-age technologies to the state's agriculture in hopes of increasing efficiency and yields.

This research is being conducted by the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station through the Advanced Spatial Technologies for Agriculture and the Remote Sensing Technologies Center at MSU.

December 13, 1999 - Filed Under: Cut Flowers and Houseplants

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Plants can make memorable gifts for the hard-to-buy-for person on anyone's list this holiday season.

Unlike many other gifts, plants are easy to shop for, come in colors and sizes to please almost anyone, and can last for years with proper care.

Norman Winter, horticulture specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said plants make good planned or last-minute gifts.

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