You are here

News From 2010

April 15, 2010 - Filed Under: Community

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Mississippi State University is making several changes as personnel are shifted to take best advantage of their strengths.

Melissa Mixon, associate vice president of MSU’s Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine, remains the interim dean of the college, known as CALS. The duties of four people are being changed within the college.

The shortened strawberry harvest has not affected the quality of the berries. Growers report that they are harvesting berries of excellent quality. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
April 9, 2010 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Fruit

By Karen Templeton
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE --  A cold winter may have delayed strawberry harvesting, but it did not affect the quality or taste of berries.

Mississippi strawberry harvest usually begins in mid-March, but this year, cold weather pushed harvest back to the second week in April.

“Temperatures were about 10 degrees lower than normal, which pushed planting back a week and in turn, delayed harvesting by a few weeks,” said Wayne Porter, Mississippi State University Extension Service agent in Lauderdale County.

Mississippi State University researchers are gathering inforamtion that will help biologists and managers determine where and when habitats should be made available for migrating and wintering ducks. (Photo by Joe Mac Hudspeth, Jr.)
April 8, 2010 - Filed Under: Environment, Wildlife, Waterfowl

MISSISSIPPI STATE –While the climate change debate is heating up worldwide, researchers at Mississippi State University are examining recent changes in duck migration patterns.

“In the past few years, we have observed that ducks are not migrating to southern latitudes in abundance or are doing so generally only during severe weather,” said Rick Kaminski, waterfowl ecologist and the James C. Kennedy Endowed Chair in Waterfowl and Wetlands Conservation.

Daffodils frame the Chapel of Memories clock tower at Mississippi State University. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
April 8, 2010 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens

By Patti Drapala
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE –Many plants contribute to the beauty of Mississippi State University’s landscape, but no sight is more universally welcomed on campus than the daffodils bursting into bloom once a year.

“Daffodils are the harbingers of spring,” said Lelia Kelly, consumer horticulturist with MSU’s Extension Service. “After a long winter without much color, people enjoy the bright, yellow flowers that signal the appearance of even more flowers as plants establish and mature.”

Heirloom tomatoes sometimes suffer more from environmental influences than their hybrid cousins. Therefore, it is important to pick good performers for the hot and humid Mississippi climate. Luckily, there are many varieties to choose from. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Gary Bachman)
April 8, 2010 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens

Many folks have been waiting for this moment. It is after Easter, and it is time to plant our warm season vegetable crops. Let’s start with heirloom tomatoes. 

Heirlooms are not your typical grocery store tomato. They come in every shape, size and color imaginable. The fruits are treasured as having more flavor, increased nutritive value and greater natural beauty. 

What makes an heirloom tomato different?  In a word: tradition. 

April 8, 2010 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Soybeans

MISSISSIPPI STATE – There is no known soybean rust in Mississippi thanks to the cold winter that killed kudzu, a common rust host, across the state.

“This is the first year since soybean rust was initially detected in the U.S. that we have essentially started at zero in regards to soybean rust,” said Tom Allen, Extension plant pathologist at the Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville. “None of us truly knows what to expect of the progression of the disease this season.”

Sunny skies on March 26 provided perfect conditions for planting this corn on George Ray Walker's farm near Stoneville. This 12-row planter is preparing a plot for a nitrogen-rate plant population study for researchers with Mississippi State University's Delta Research and Extension Center. (Photo by Rebekah Ray)
April 1, 2010 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Cotton

By Linda Breazeale
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Cotton will not be returning to the throne in Mississippi, but growers are slightly more enthusiastic about this former king than they have been in recent years.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture released its annual prospective plantings report March 31, and Mississippi producers are predicted to plant 340,000 acres of cotton. That is an increase of 11 percent from 2009 but is a far cry from the 1.2 million acres planted in 2005 and 2006.

Lelia Kelly, a horticulturist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, demonstrates how to prune shrubs in one of her "Gardening Through the Seasons" online videos. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Tim Allison)
April 1, 2010 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Patti Drapala
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Well-kept yards and gardens require seasonal maintenance, a task that Mississippi State University horticulturists have simplified with a new online instructional video series.

The series, “Gardening through the Seasons,” addresses gardening tasks to be done at different times of the year. Each video is about 5 minutes long and features MSU horticulturists demonstrating techniques, examples and problem solving.

April 1, 2010 - Filed Under: Family, Insects-Human Pests, Insects, Insects-Pests

MISSISSIPPI STATE – When winter is finally over and warm weather sets in to stay, Mississippians can put their warm things safely away for next year by taking a few precautions.

Some people think of storing winter clothes as a simple task of moving items from one closet to another or placing them in a box in the attic. However, improper storage can lead to stains, insect problems and an unpleasant surprise when cold weather returns.

Kaitlyn Plance, left, and Jordan Jackson, right, work to build a robot with Amy Walsh, Amite County 4-H Agent. The youth are learning science, technology and engineering through the 4-H robotics program. (Photo by Mariah Smith)
April 1, 2010 - Filed Under: 4-H, Technology

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Nearly 200 Mississippi 4-H youth are learning science, technology and engineering skills as they work with robots and meet monthly via videoconferencing to learn new skills and take on new challenges.

Mariah Smith, an instructor with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, is coordinating the program for Mississippi 4-H. She said the youth learn basic science, technology and engineering concepts behind robots and make simple robotic elements out of non-traditional parts.

The flowers of Bouquet Purple dianthus are a vivid, dark pink with petals having tattered, upturned margins. The stems are up to 18 inches long, making these a great choice for cut flowers.  (Photos by Gary Bachman)
April 1, 2010 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens

When a plant with pretty flowers is advertised as easy to grow, it always catches the gardener’s eye. While plants may not live up to this billing, pinks deliver in the landscape.

You can call them cottage, cheddar or just plain pinks, but this group in the Dianthus genus are composed of several species and hybrids. Pinks are close relatives of the florist carnation and the wildflower Sweet William.

April 1, 2010 - Filed Under: Community, Economic Development, Rural Development

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Research by the Southern Rural Development Center at Mississippi State University has been included in a new book about positive approaches to community development.

“Mobilizing Communities: Asset Building as a Community Development Strategy” includes a chapter by SRDC director Lionel “Bo” Beaulieu and his colleague Mark Harvey, assistant sociology professor at Florida Atlantic University. Harvey completed his post-doctoral work at SRDC and was an assistant research professor at MSU.

The Animal Emergency and Referral Center at 1009 Treetops Boulevard in Flowood opened on March 17.
March 26, 2010 - Filed Under: Animal Health

FLOWOOD -- Private practice veterinarians are partnering with Mississippi State University to provide around-the-clock emergency care and referral services for critical cases in the Jackson area.

The Animal Emergency and Referral Center at 1009 Treetops Boulevard in Flowood opened on March 17. From 7:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. on weekdays, the center’s veterinarian and three veterinary technicians handle critical surgery, orthopedic and neurological cases that are referred to them from practicing veterinarians. No elective surgeries, primary care or routine treatments are provided.

March 26, 2010 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Wheat

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi's winter wheat crop is smaller and later than normal because of fall rains, and a colder-than-normal spring may limit the crop's yield.

Erick Larson, grain crops specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said Mississippi's wheat acreage is expected to be well short of the 10-year average of 225,000 acres.

Bearden throws out the first pitch at the MSU baseball game February 26. She was honored for 50 years of service during MSU’s 132nd birthday celebration. (Photo by Scott Corey)
March 26, 2010 - Filed Under: Community, About Extension

MISSISSIPPI STATE – When Nancy Bearden accepted a job at the Winston County Extension office in 1960, she never realized she would be a part of the Mississippi State University family for the next 50 years.

Bearden has the distinction of being the university’s longest-tenured employee. She will celebrate the anniversary in August, but she was honored Feb. 26 by throwing out the first pitch at the MSU versus Southeastern Louisiana baseball game. The event was part of MSU’s 132nd birthday celebration.

The wild pig herd pictured here caused significant damage in a short amount of time by rooting the land. (Photo by USDA APHIS/Carol Bannerman)
March 25, 2010 - Filed Under: Environment, Nuisance Wildlife and Damage Management

By Karen Templeton
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Wild pigs are digging up trouble across the state and causing major crop damage, so Mississippi State University and federal experts are helping landowners and farmers eradicate the troublesome beasts.

Wild pigs are a highly adaptable species that is not native to North America. They are seen throughout the country, causing vast agricultural and environmental damage.

Looking over their winning application for national recognition are Mississippi State University Collegiate 4-H'ers, from left, Savannah Duckworth of New Albany, Stuart Wright of Columbus, Brittany Reed of Greenwood and Shad Benn of Hattiesburg. (Photo by Scott Corey)
March 25, 2010 - Filed Under: 4-H, Collegiate 4-H, Family

By Patti Drapala
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A group of Mississippi State University students has spent two years breathing life into the inactive chapter of Collegiate 4-H on campus, and for those doing the hard work, recognition from the National Collegiate 4-H organization feels great.

The blooms of columbine add mixes of bright pastels to any landscape.  The all-white Dove and bi-color Bluebird pictured here are from the Songbird Series.
March 25, 2010 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens

With flowers suspended on thin, wiry stems, bobbing along in the breeze as if floating on water, the columbine makes the perfect addition to any garden or landscape.

Columbine foliage is reminiscent of maidenhair fern, being attached to the plant by long petioles. The flowers are an interesting landscape addition with colors ranging from purple and blue to yellow, white and red. Columbine bi-colored varieties of red and white, red and yellow, and blue and white are spectacular. The flowers either turn up or nod downward.

A Mississippi State University farm worker is planting foundation seed of the Bowman rice variety in this field at the North Mississippi Research and Extension Center at Verona in 2009. Local seed companies and growers depend each year on MSU and the Mississippi Foundation Seed Stocks to provide quality foundation seed of improved varieties. (Photo by /Mississippi Foundation Seed Stocks/ Randy Vaughan)
March 25, 2010 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Farming

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Local seed companies and growers depend each year on Mississippi State University to provide quality foundation seed of improved varieties.

MSU established Mississippi Foundation Seed Stocks in 1959 as a unit of the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station. At its peak production in the early 1980s, the unit supplied about 110,000 bushels of foundation seed each year of mostly soybeans, cotton and rice.

March 25, 2010 - Filed Under: Biofuels

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Citizens, developers and policymakers in the renewable energy industry across the South who want a clean, vibrant and secure energy future can explore options at an upcoming two-day conference in Tunica.

The Ninth Annual Southern BioProducts and Renewable Energy Conference will be April 13-14 at Harrah’s Resort Hotel. The Mississippi Biomass and Renewable Energy Council hosts the annual state conference.

Pages

Archive