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News From 2001

Lavender Wave , an All-America Selections winner for 2002, has the same performance and habit as the Purple Wave, a 2000 Mississippi Medallion winner.
December 31, 2001 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Wave petunias keep pouring in -- much to the delight of gardeners everywhere. It was just a couple of years ago the Waves as a group (purple, pink, lilac and rose) were declared Mississippi Medallion winners and now there is Lavender Wave.

Love & Peace exhibits the classic hybrid tea form and shows a family resemblance to its parent, Peace, the most honored rose of all time.
December 24, 2001 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

As the New Year arrives, it is fun to see what new plants are being touted for spring. Rose lovers for sure are interested in the new All-America Rose Selections.

Two roses captured All-America Selection honors for 2002, Love & Peace and Starry Night.

Love & Peace will mesmerize the rose grower or garden enthusiast with both its fruity scent and appearance.

December 17, 2001 - Filed Under: Christmas Trees

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Give Christmas trees a second chance to be useful after the lights and tinsel are gone.

Finding uses for discarded Christmas trees is a tradition with its roots in 16th century Europe, said Steve Dicke, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service.

December 17, 2001 - Filed Under: Poultry

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Increases in exports, acceptance and profitability enabled the poultry and egg industry to hold the top spot in Mississippi's 2001 agricultural commodities.

For 2001, the estimated value of farm production for poultry and eggs was $1.54 billion, a 12-percent increase from 2000's total. The industry's value surpassed forestry's $1.12 billion and cotton's $527 million.

December 17, 2001 - Filed Under: Forestry

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Forestry easily maintained its hold as Mississippi's second largest agricultural commodity, despite a 10-percent decline in value.

The 2001 farm value of forestry is estimated at $1.1 billion -- second to poultry's $1.5 billion level. Bob Daniels, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said 2001 was harder on the forest industry than it was on landowners.

December 17, 2001 - Filed Under: Cotton

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi cotton growers may not have battled drought-stress conditions at the levels of recent years, but the 2001 growing season was not without major challenges.

Timely rains throughout the growing season had cotton ginners searching for warehouse space in mid-August to accommodate the bumper crop. Unseasonable rains in late August and early September began impacting early-planted and early-maturing varieties. Seeds began sprouting in the bolls and regrowth was rampant.

Values
December 17, 2001 - Filed Under: Agriculture

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Bolstered by increases in poultry and row crops, agricultural economists are predicting Mississippi's 2001 farm production value to remain near $4.8 billion, a 2.6-percent increase over the previous year.

Kalanchoe is a member of the family known as Crassulaceae.
December 17, 2001 - Filed Under: Houseplants

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Cnter

Kalanchoe, one of the most beautiful holiday plants in the world, is showing up at garden centers everywhere. A native to Madagascar and Africa, kalanchoe will certainly display its outstanding features in many Mississippi homes this holiday season.

December 10, 2001 - Filed Under: Farm Safety

By Bethany Waldrop Keiper

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Many Mississippians turn to gasoline-powered generators to provide power and warmth during winter's electrical outages, but improperly maintaining or using generators can make a difficult situation even worse.

Plum Pudding
December 10, 2001 - Filed Under: Houseplants

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Trends toward richer colors during the holiday season may be one reason Plum Pudding, a new maroon poinsettia, will be in demand this year. Excelling in consumer and grower trials, this beauty also is sure to delight lots of Mississippi State University fans who still want to show their school colors during the holidays.

December 10, 2001 - Filed Under: Farm Safety

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi has earned a first-place rank that no state would envy: highway deaths.

The National Safety Council Accident Facts 2001 ranked Mississippi first in three categories for motor vehicle deaths. The state had the greatest number of traffic deaths per million miles driven, per 10,000 vehicles registered and per 100,000 population.

December 3, 2001 - Filed Under: Farmers Markets

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Farmers' markets are finding their niche in community economies across the state as producers and customers develop mutually beneficial relationships.

"Farmers' markets have a place in communities who have an appreciation for fresh produce," said David Nagel, horticulture specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service. "Prices are similar to grocery stores, but the produce is fresher. Most of the produce is grown within a 25-mile radius of the market. Grocery produce may be from as far as 2,000 miles away."

Just about anyone can install water features.
December 3, 2001 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Yosemite National Park is famous for its majestic waterfalls, but it was a babbling brook that my family appreciated there last summer during a hike through a forest. We sat down to watch, listen and appreciate for 30 minutes or so. That mood and pleasure created by this active water can be duplicated in any landscape.

December 3, 2001 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- A new 4-H horticulture curriculum is taking root in classrooms across Mississippi, and students are gaining a new appreciation for gardening.

Lelia Kelly, area Extension horticulturist in Verona, said test results from the first Junior Master Gardeners have some educators and youth workers enthused about the program's potential. Administered by the Mississippi State University Extension Service, 11 schools and six after-school clubs took part in a pilot program in the spring of 2001.

November 29, 2001 - Filed Under: Community

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Vance H. Watson, director of the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, has been named interim vice president of the Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine and interim dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Mississippi State University. The appointment is effective Jan. 1, 2002, subject to approval by the Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning.

November 26, 2001 - Filed Under: Pesticide Applicator Certification

By Charmain Tan Courcelle

MISSISSIPPI STATE--Environmentalists and citizens concerned about agricultural chemicals moving into the environment from farms may take heart from a project investigating the fate of pesticides.

November 26, 2001 - Filed Under: Agriculture

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Three cattlemen in northeast Mississippi recognized the value of combining forces in the quest for a better product and higher profits.

Chip Waterer of Circle W Ranch in Chickasaw County and brothers Mike and Rick Howell of Holly Ridge Farm in Lee County merged their registered Angus and commercial cattle operations in the fall of 1999. The offspring are being combined into a new production company called Southern Shine Pastures.

Camellias enhance the landscape like no other shrub with their glossy green leaves and exotic looking blooms.
November 26, 2001 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

When you see some camellia japonicas blooming earlier, larger and more colorful than others, you may be seeing the results of a horticultural technique known as gibbing.

As camellia shows start to pop up in malls and other public places, it becomes apparent that some experts know something that the basic gardener may not.

The mirror hanging on the tree over the left Adirondack chair blends comfortably into this lovely home-like setting.
November 25, 2001 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
MSU Extension Horticulturist

Many of us have toured someone's yard only to find they have the same flowers that are growing in our own beds, but something is dramatically different. Theirs is a special garden that makes us shoot a picture, either real or mentally. We leave either energized to do better or feeling a little depressed.

November 19, 2001 - Filed Under: Commercial Horticulture

By Charmain Tan Courcelle

VERONA -- Research at the North Mississippi Research and Extension Center may one day extend the shelf life of floral arrangements purchased in Mississippi.

Crofton Sloan, horticulturist with the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, is searching for flower species and cultivars that may be used to establish a cut-flower industry in Mississippi. A local source could mean fresher blooms in the state's florist shops.

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