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News From 1998

June 4, 1998 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Having lived all but two years of my life with alkaline soils and lots of water, I relished the opportunity to come to Mississippi a little over three years ago. The chance to finally grow azaleas, camellias and dogwoods was icing on the cake.

June 1, 1998 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Lowering weight limits on roads may not benefit taxpayers as much as it appears when it puts more log trucks on the road and causes timber prices to fall.

Mississippi law currently has set an 80,000 pound weight limit on roads. A harvest permit can be bought for $25 allowing a 4,000 pound tolerance above this limit. County supervisors can change the weight limit on county roads, and some are considering lowering it to 40,000 or 57,600 pounds.

June 1, 1998 - Filed Under: Community

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi's miles of waterways make boating one of the more popular summer pastimes, but without caution, boating can be dangerous.

In 1997, 20 people died in boating accidents. According to figures released by Elizabeth Raymond, boating law administrator for the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks, the state had 122 boating accidents last year. Of these, 52 involved personal water craft.

June 1, 1998 - Filed Under: Insects-Pet Pests

By Kelli McPhail

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Pets are a vital part of many families, but creating an environment where animals and owners can live without fleas may take a little extra cleaning inside and outside the home.

Dr. Richard Hopper, a Mississippi State University Extension Service veterinarian, said fleas do not just live on animals, but they also live in the animal's environment.

"Fleas drop off where pets play, sleep and eat," Hopper said. "Keeping all areas of your house and yard clean is important to keep fleas from taking over."

June 1, 1998 - Filed Under: Community

By Kelli McPhail

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Shoes, purses, suits, dresses, hats, household linens and other historical memorabilia help students at Mississippi State University step back in time to study apparel design, textiles and merchandising.

The Historic Costume and Textile Collection in the MSU School of Human Sciences is the resource behind these history lessons. The collection, made up of over 1,000 items, ranges from the 1800s to the 1970s and links students to the study of Mississippi fashion.

June 1, 1998 - Filed Under: Poultry

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- A test that predicts a rooster's fertility may one day dramatically impact the poultry industry.

Mississippi's poultry holds the state's top agriculture spot, with a current farm gate value of about $1.4 billion. Research in this field can propel the industry even higher.

Dr. Chris McDaniel, poultry scientist with the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, has applied a simple fertility test to the poultry industry. His results indicate the industry could increase egg fertility rates by 5 percent.

May 29, 1998 - Filed Under: Cotton

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi's cotton crop is off to a good start this year with boll weevil treatments set to begin in early June.

Dr. Blake Layton, entomologist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said cotton pin-head square applications should begin the first week of June in some places, but most of the crop will be treated the following week.

May 28, 1998 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

"They re-seed prolifically" is a warning I give quite often when discussing various plants. Even though I said "warning," more and more gardeners are looking at it as a blessing, and the same when we tell them a particular plant may have invasive tendencies. It seems gardeners are ready for those plants that are so happy to "be fruitful and multiply" as the Bible says.

May 22, 1998 - Filed Under: Forages

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Recent dry weather has been great for putting up winter hay, but it's slowed the growth of summer grasses and reduced its quality.

Dr. Bill Tucker, supervisor of the Mississippi State University dairy farm, said abnormal weather has made the first cutting of summer hay late this season.

"The weather has been hotter and drier than normal and our summer grasses have not come out as vigorously as they usually do," Tucker said.

Quality, as well as quantity, suffers as well when there is not enough moisture.

May 21, 1998 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Two relatively new flowering plants are attracting attention across Mississippi. They are Husker Red penstemon and angelonia.

Husker Red penstemon was the Perennial Plant of the Year a couple of years ago. On a recent trip to Verona, I saw it in a Mississippi State University test garden, and it looked awesome!

May 18, 1998 - Filed Under: Family Financial Management

By Kelli McPhail

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Summer vacations can mean big headaches, but with careful planning and budgeting, they can be fun and relaxing.

Dr. Beverly Howell, Mississippi State University Extension Service's family economics specialist, said a plan for saving money makes a yearly vacation possible.

May 18, 1998 - Filed Under: Children and Parenting

By Kelli McPhail

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Children want to have fun and parents often seem desperate to find a place for kids to stay during summer months. Working together may solve the problem.

Dr. Louise Davis, Mississippi State University Extension Service's child and family development specialist, said full-time care during the day might create the best environment for children.

May 18, 1998 - Filed Under: SAFETY – Safe Archery and Firearms Education and Training for Youth

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- A Mississippi 4-H program is doing what it can to ensure that a gun in the hands of a young person does not mean trouble.

Youth ages 8 to 18 enrolled in the Mississippi Field and Stream Program not only learn hunting, and wildlife and fisheries management, they also learn respect for guns and how and when to use them.

May 18, 1998 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Many people have no trouble selling used cars, houses and even land, but when it comes to selling timber, it's not easy doing it right the first time without help.

Dr. Dannie Reed, Mississippi State University Extension Service agent in Choctaw County, said a managed timber sale is the way to sell timber and get the best price. This requires an evaluation of the timber, an advertised sale and sealed bids.

May 15, 1998 - Filed Under: Technology

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Weather discussions are not new to farmers, but a recently developed Internet site can take those talks to the next level.

May 14, 1998 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Now that Mother's Day is over, I would like to pose a question. What is the perfect rose?

When I was executive director of the American Rose Society, I loved to ask that in a group because it was almost certain to start a skirmish. If there were a few more rose growers in the world, we could probably start a small war with the question.

May 8, 1998 - Filed Under: Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Low log inventories around the state last winter kept timber prices high, and landowners continue to respond by bringing more to market.

Dr. Bob Daniels, forestry specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said wet weather was a key factor in log inventories this winter.

"Rainy weather kept logging and transportation operations difficult from late October through February, especially in Central and South Mississippi," Daniels said.

May 7, 1998 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Norman Winter
Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

There was something about the recent Garden and Patio Show in Jackson that really surprised me. Gardener after gardener was walking out of the show carrying a trellis, tower and even arbors. Climbing plants are back in business.

May 4, 1998 - Filed Under: 4-H

By Amy Woolfolk

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Parents and youth who think school is the only place to learn need to think again. The Mississippi 4-H program offers a wide variety of learning experiences this summer.

"Our summer calendar is full of fun camps, conferences and workshops on many topics," said Sandy Slocum, extension 4-H associate. "With these programs we want to educate kids about specific subjects, and also teach them valuable life skills. These events are enjoyable, and youth look forward to coming to them year after year."

May 4, 1998 - Filed Under: Environment

GREENWOOD -- More than 100 Leflore County homes are safer places after families safely disposed of household hazardous wastes, but experts say hazardous waste remains in houses around the state.

Leflore County held a household hazardous waste roundup the last weekend in April. Lacey Henderson, Leflore County home economist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said 125 families brought waste products from the house that, if not properly disposed of, are dangerous to the environment.

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