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Frequently Asked Questions

Is it possible for vegetables, especially squash, watermelons, pumpkins, etc., to cross in the garden to create a strange fruit?

This question comes up every year. Here's the bottom line on vegetable crossing.

Most vegetables do not cross since they would have to be in the same species to cross. But even if they DO cross (those that are in the same species) it will have no effect on the current year's fruit.
Only the seeds will be affected and this will not show up unless you save your own seeds and plant them the next year. In that case, there may be all kinds off types produced.

FYI, watermelons and squash are in different species so it is impossible for them to cross at all.

The crosses that can occur are some squashes with some pumpkins (if they are in the same species, namely Cucurbita pepo) - there are several other species of squash and pumpkins.

Also, various types of melons (NOT watermelons) can cross. These include cantaloupes, honeydews, canaries, crenshaw, santa claus melons, and persian melons since they are in the same species, Cucumis melo.


Dr. Rick Snyder, Extension Vegetable Specialist

 

 

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Publication Number: P3076
Publication Number: P2364
Publication Number: P1782

News

Rich, wide, dark-green leaves with white veins rise from an unfurling center.
Filed Under: Vegetable Gardens January 18, 2019

If there’s one vegetable that could be considered the ultimate home-grown vegetable in Mississippi, it has to be collards.

Collards were chosen as a 2019 Mississippi Medallion winner because they are considered absolutely necessary for true Southern cuisine. As a bonus, they’re really easy for home gardeners to grow.

A man with a white goatee and dark-framed glasses leans on a table behind a small LED table lamp and a tray of seedlings. He wears a blue floral Hawaiian shirt and brown hat.
Filed Under: Vegetable Gardens January 18, 2019

For people who love gardening, the long, dark, cold winter months can be torture. Gardening catalogs are fine, but their allure can only last so long before we want to get our hands back in the soil! (Photo by Jonathan Parrish/Cindy Callahan)

Bright red and green ornamental peppers stand out against a background of green leaves and a small Christmas tree with multicolored lights.
Filed Under: Cut Flowers and Houseplants, Vegetable Gardens December 4, 2018

If you want to spice up your Christmas décor this year, add some ornamental peppers to your indoor and outdoor displays. (Photo by Jonathan Parrish/Cindy Callahan)

A group of people stand behind a waist-high, elevated raised gardening bed full of green potato foliage.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Herb Gardens, Vegetable Gardens November 16, 2018

Not into conventional gardening? A salad table just may be for you.

With these elevated gardening beds, you can grow fresh vegetables and herbs throughout the year right at your fingertips. These tables work well in small spaces and eliminate the physical demands of an in-ground garden. (Photo courtesy of Carla Moore)

Fingers steady an upside-down flower pot as a drill bit pierces the bottom to make drainage holes.
Filed Under: Cut Flowers and Houseplants, Flower Gardens, Herb Gardens, Vegetable Gardens, Youth Gardening November 6, 2018

You’ve got a lovely container, and you want to put a plant in it. But if that container doesn’t have drainage holes, you’ll end up with a dead plant. (Photo by Jonathan Parrish/Cindy Callahan)

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