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Frequently Asked Questions

Is it possible for vegetables, especially squash, watermelons, pumpkins, etc., to cross in the garden to create a strange fruit?

This question comes up every year. Here's the bottom line on vegetable crossing.

Most vegetables do not cross since they would have to be in the same species to cross. But even if they DO cross (those that are in the same species) it will have no effect on the current year's fruit.
Only the seeds will be affected and this will not show up unless you save your own seeds and plant them the next year. In that case, there may be all kinds off types produced.

FYI, watermelons and squash are in different species so it is impossible for them to cross at all.

The crosses that can occur are some squashes with some pumpkins (if they are in the same species, namely Cucurbita pepo) - there are several other species of squash and pumpkins.

Also, various types of melons (NOT watermelons) can cross. These include cantaloupes, honeydews, canaries, crenshaw, santa claus melons, and persian melons since they are in the same species, Cucumis melo.


Dr. Rick Snyder, Extension Vegetable Specialist

 

 

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News

Fingers steady an upside-down flower pot as a drill bit pierces the bottom to make drainage holes.
Filed Under: Cut Flowers and Houseplants, Flower Gardens, Herb Gardens, Vegetable Gardens, Youth Gardening November 6, 2018

You’ve got a lovely container, and you want to put a plant in it. But if that container doesn’t have drainage holes, you’ll end up with a dead plant. (Photo by Jonathan Parrish/Cindy Callahan)

MSU Extension agent Sandy Havard wears a maroon shirt and holds an Extension soil sample box.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Soil Testing, Trees, Turfgrass and Lawn Management, Vegetable Gardens October 2, 2018

If your lawn, landscape, or garden look a little sickly, it might be time for a soil health checkup. (Photo by Jonathan Parrish/Cindy Callahan)

Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Herb Gardens, Vegetable Gardens September 4, 2018

Garden enthusiasts and horticultural industry professionals can enjoy the largest home gardening show in the Southeast Oct. 12 and 13.

Two long, green bell peppers hang from a plant growing in a container above black plastic.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Vegetable Gardens August 27, 2018

Several weeks ago, I wrote about looking forward to the time of year when ornamental peppers start strutting their gorgeous fruit colors. What I didn’t mention is that late summer is not just for ornamental peppers; I always get my best home-grown culinary peppers from August until frost in the fall.

My tastes for culinary peppers range from the mild and colorful bell peppers all the way to the superhot selections like Ghost, Scorpion and Carolina Reaper.

A pepper plant is shown in the garden.
Filed Under: Insects-Vegetable Gardens, Plant Diseases, Vegetable Gardens August 14, 2018

Your summer vegetable garden is likely winding down, but you still have time for another round of fresh vegetables, including tomatoes, peppers, squash and cucumbers. (File photo by MSU Extension Service)

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Okra
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Sharpening Your Tools

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