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When should peppers be sidedressed with N?

Peppers should be side-dressed with 30 to 60 pounds of nitrogen (N) per acre when the first fruit is about the size of a quarter. Use calcium nitrate if there is a history of blossom end rot, otherwise use the cheapest and easiest source of N.

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Blossom-end rot, seen on this tomato, is a common problem in home gardens. It is typically caused by uneven watering, which prevents enough calcium from reaching the fruit. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
Filed Under: Tomato Pepper and Eggplant, Vegetable Gardens June 21, 2012

MISSISSIPPI STATE – While nothing may beat the fresh taste of a home-grown tomato, a lot of things can go wrong in the garden to prevent the fruit from ever making it to the table.

Garden experts say tomato plants should be watered well, fertilized correctly, grown in direct sunlight and spaced properly so their leaves stay as dry as possible.

David Nagel, vegetable and home garden specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, listed three common problems that can plague tomato plants.

Sweet Pickle pepper has 2-inch-long fruit that resembles the big and bold old-fashioned Christmas tree lights. Its fruit is sweet rather than hot, and the plant loads up with a bounty of red, orange, yellow and purple fruit all at one time.
Filed Under: Tomato Pepper and Eggplant, Vegetable Gardens September 24, 2009

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

If you would like to give your garden a festive fall atmosphere, then find a prominent place to put in ornamental peppers. Their blooms are not noteworthy, but varieties like Sweet Pickle and Garda Tricolore have fruit that will show off like Christmas lights.

Ornamental peppers are one of the plants that leap off the garden center shelves this time of the year. If you love them in the fall, try growing them all season.

Tequila sweet bell peppers start off green, then change to yellow, orange, deep dark purple and eventually become a tasty sweet red pepper. Suitable for harvest in any color, these Mississippi Medallion award-winning peppers add a colorful zest to salads.
Filed Under: Tomato Pepper and Eggplant, Vegetable Gardens February 1, 2007

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

Winter's coldest days drive most of us deep into the cushions of our easy chairs, and gardening is largely in the form of dreams about spring and summer plantings.

Permit me to do a little armchair quarterbacking by encouraging gardeners to consider growing an incredible sweet bell pepper called Tequila. The Mississippi Plant Selections Committee recently introduced it as a 2007 Mississippi Medallion award winner. 

Filed Under: Other Vegetables, Peas and Beans, Sweet Corn, Tomato Pepper and Eggplant, Vegetable Gardens August 6, 2001

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Just as Good Friday signals the time to get the spring garden in the ground, August's heat is the indication that it's time to plant the fall garden.

David Nagel, horticulture specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said now is the time to plant tomatoes, peppers, squash, sweet corn, peas and beans.

"Summer gardens typically wind down in early August when the temperatures start being consistently above 95 degrees," Nagel said. "That's when you clean the garden out and plant the fall garden."

Filed Under: Tomato Pepper and Eggplant April 16, 2001

By Norman Winter
MSU Horticulturist
Central Mississippi Research & Extension Center

The tears rolled down my cheeks, and my lips felt singed and blistered as I ate what I thought was the most wonderful chicken in existence. I may have muttered something like "it hurt so good." This happened at a beach side restaurant in Negril, Jamaica. The street vendor in the town of Gosier on the French Island of Guadeloupe, however, equaled the experience with his own scorching version.

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