You are here

School Gardening

School gardens have been used to teach students since the 1800's. Fredrick Froebel founded the first kindergarten in 1840. Froebel designed his kindergarten, which translated means child garden, to teach children through gardening. Since this time, teachers throughout the world have recognized the benefits of using school gardens.

The benefits of school gardens are numerous some include:

  • Exciting and meaningful learning for students.
  • Enhanced academic achievement.
  • Improvement of students' social skills and cooperation.
  • Understanding of the natural world.

School gardens can be an enjoyable place for teachers and students.

Other Information

KinderGARDEN
A great website for information on gardening with children.

Printer Friendly and PDF

News

Filed Under: Food and Health, Food, Nutrition, SNAP-Ed, Herb Gardens, Vegetable Gardens, Youth Gardening August 9, 2017

RAYMOND, Miss. -- The Mississippi State University Extension Service hired three regional registered dietitians to help in the fight against obesity and chronic disease in Mississippi.

Samantha Willcutt, Kaitlin DeWitt and Juaqula Madkin have joined the Extension Office of Nutrition Education. They oversee the Extension Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education, or SNAP-Ed, curriculum and delivery in their regions.

Filed Under: Youth Gardening September 23, 2002

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi's Junior Master Gardener program has gone from an idea introduced two years ago to one that involves more than 1,200 youth in horticulture-related fun, service and learning opportunities.

Lelia Kelly is the state coordinator for the Mississippi State University 4-H Junior Master Gardener program. JMG, as it is known, targets young people in grades three through eight, but it is for any group of youth, not just school classes.

Filed Under: Youth Gardening January 15, 2001

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- A group of 105 youngsters in Kossuth have included gardening in their classroom activities and become the first Junior Master Gardener group in the state.

In November, the Kossuth Aggie Junior Gardeners registered as Junior Master Gardeners. The fifth graders' teachers began teaching a gardening curriculum and the classes began working in their outdoor classroom at the school. The group studies environmental and horticultural topics, does hands-on activities, and has the opportunity to take on community leadership projects.

Contact Your County Office