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News Filed Under Irrigation

Alternating wet and dry rice production systems allow rice fields to dry to several inches below the surface before adding more water. Research shows such fields maintain yields while cutting water use dramatically. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Lee Atwill)
March 28, 2017 - Filed Under: Rice, Irrigation

STONEVILLE, Miss. -- Alternating wet and dry production is a radical new way to grow rice, and some Mississippi producers are finding the idea not only seems feasible in theory, but also works well in practice.

Jason Krutz is an irrigation specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service and a researcher with the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station. He said the technique, known as AWD, grows rice without standing water, which reduces water use by about a third while also maintaining yields.

This is a tailwater recovery system on a row-crop farm in the Mississippi Delta. (MSU Extension Service file photo)
February 17, 2017 - Filed Under: Irrigation, Water

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- With spring around the corner, gardeners and farmers are beginning to plan for the upcoming planting and growing seasons.

One important way to ensure success during the Mississippi growing season is to have a plan for irrigation. Water keeps plants alive during the hot Mississippi summers, so irrigation is often vital during times of limited rainfall.

September 8, 2016 - Filed Under: Irrigation, Soybeans

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Dry September weather has Mississippi soybean producers on opposite ends of the irrigation spectrum: Some are done, while others want to water one more time.

Jason Krutz, irrigation specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, has a question for them: What do the soil moisture sensors say?

Jason Krutz, Mississippi State University Extension Service irrigation specialist, spoke Dec. 15, 2015, at the Delta Sustainable Water Resources Task Force in Stoneville, Mississippi. He reported on the success of efforts to increase irrigation efficiency while not reducing crop yields. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Bonnie Coblentz)
December 18, 2015 - Filed Under: Irrigation

STONEVILLE, Miss. -- About 190 people gathered Tuesday to focus on water use and conservation, a showing that demonstrates just how important this topic is to the Delta and state.

The Delta Sustainable Water Resources Task Force convened the 2015 Mississippi Delta Irrigation Summit in Stoneville. The event drew farmers, consultants, industry suppliers, university researchers, Extension agents and U.S. Department of Agriculture officials from Mississippi, Arkansas and Louisiana.

June 30, 2015 - Filed Under: Crops, Irrigation, Technology

STONEVILLE, Miss. -- Row crop producers who irrigate their crops can learn the benefits of soil moisture sensors during two separate field days planned for July and August.

Jason Krutz, an irrigation specialist with Mississippi State University, said farmers can learn about the advantages of using soil moisture sensors to determine when to irrigate.

Participants also can see the devices in action. Product demonstrations by manufacturers and distributors will showcase types of sensors, features and costs.

June 12, 2015 - Filed Under: Irrigation, Water

WASHINGTON COUNTY, Miss. -- Delta Farmers Advocating Resource Management will host the Monsanto Water Conservation Field Day July 7 from 10 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.

Attendees will meet at Simmons Planting Company on state Highway 438, 3.7 miles east of the U.S. 61 intersection near Arcola. They will then go to Murrell Farms to see the latest rice irrigation practices and surface water irrigation systems.

Jason Krutz, an irrigation specialist with Mississippi State University, teaches producers how to use portable soil moisture meters to conserve water while still providing the proper amount of water for plant growth. (File photo by MSU Ag Communications/Bonnie Coblentz)
February 24, 2015 - Filed Under: Irrigation, Water

STONEVILLE, Miss. -- The benefits for conserving water for farmers are the reduction of costs and the retaining of a higher yield, and Mississippi State University is promoting tools to help them achieve that goal.

Jason Krutz, an irrigation expert at the MSU Delta Research and Extension Center, said certain irrigation decisions can benefit the agricultural economy.

Jason Krutz, irrigation specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, addresses water efficiency on cropland during the Mississippi Delta Irrigation Summit in Stoneville, Mississippi, on Dec. 10, 2014. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
December 12, 2014 - Filed Under: Irrigation, Water

STONEVILLE -- Mississippi’s agricultural industry is not going about “business as usual” above ground while the underground water supplies decline every year.

Production agriculture experts and producers can learn more about effective irrigation practices, such as this furrow irrigation using polyethylene pipe, at the Irrigation and Water Conservation Summit in Stoneville on Dec. 10. (File photo by MSU Ag Communications)
November 20, 2014 - Filed Under: Crops, Irrigation

STONEVILLE -- Row crop producers, landowners and others interested in the latest research findings and technologies related to water management can attend a one-day event in Stoneville.

State and regional experts will gather Dec. 10 in the Capps Center, located at the Mississippi State University Delta Research and Extension Center, for the Irrigation and Water Conservation Summit.

Across the Delta, many producers are abandoning pivot-irrigation systems for furrow irrigation. This unused system sat rusting near Highway 82 in Leland, Mississippi, on June 18, 2014. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Bonnie Coblentz)
September 5, 2014 - Filed Under: Irrigation

STONEVILLE -- Pivot irrigation is no longer a common sight across the Delta, but experts say this system remains a viable and efficient way to water crops.

“I would like to see pivots in the Delta,” said Jason Krutz, irrigation specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service. “They deliver water more efficiently, so if we have an aquifer problem, which everything indicates we do, they would go a long way towards helping address it.”

Recent farm profits have made it possible for growers to install irrigation equipment on many northeast Mississippi farm acres. Pivot irrigation, such as this found in the Mississippi Delta, is the most efficient delivery method, especially when coupled with soil moisture meters. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
May 5, 2014 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Irrigation, Technology

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Recent high profits in farming have made it possible for many Mississippi growers to install irrigation systems, and Mississippi State University researchers are urging the producers to install soil moisture sensors at the same time.

Winter is the perfect time to implement changes to make furrow irrigation more efficient. Mississippi State University researchers are encouraging the use of computerized hole selection tools to specify the size of hole that should be punched in polypipe to allow the correct amount of water to flow down each furrow (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/File Photo)
February 6, 2014 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Irrigation

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The downtime of winter is the perfect time to put into place three tools to make irrigation more efficient in the growing season.

Jason Krutz, irrigation specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said now is the time to implement a computerized hole selection tool and install soil moisture sensors and surge valves.

January 10, 2014 - Filed Under: Irrigation

STONEVILLE -- Producers interested in the latest research-based irrigation information are invited to attend one of four workshops hosted by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

Extension irrigation specialist Jason Krutz, who also works with the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, will discuss the PHAUCET, or Pipe Hole and Universal Crown Evaluation Tool, program; surge valves; moisture meters and other irrigation tools on these dates:

Jason Krutz, an irrigation specialist with Mississippi State University, holds a portable soil moisture meter, one of the tools needed to help producers make irrigation decisions with scientific accuracy. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Bonnie Coblentz)
December 17, 2013 - Filed Under: Irrigation, Technology

MISSISSIPPI STATE – If Jason Krutz could put one item on the Christmas list of every row crop farmer in Mississippi, Santa’s elves could not make enough soil moisture sensors to keep up with demand.

Poinsettias at Standing Pine Nursery in Raymond get consistent water and fertilizer through a modified low-pressure, drip irrigation system in this Oct. 18 photo. The irrigation system helps the business save time and water and reduces disease pressure on plants. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Susan Collins-Smith)
November 7, 2013 - Filed Under: Nursery Safety Videos, Irrigation

RAYMOND – Standing Pine Nursery is growing flowers – and its profit margin – by experimenting with an irrigation system designed for field crops.

The low pressure drip irrigation system helped increase the nursery’s efficiency and sustainability by reducing labor demands and water usage.

Jason Krutz, Mississippi State University Extension Service and Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station irrigation specialist, uses a meter to accurately determine the moisture content of the soil in a soybean field Aug. 30, 2013, at the MSU Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Bonnie Coblentz)
September 12, 2013 - Filed Under: Soybeans, Irrigation

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Knowing when to say when is key to successful soybean irrigation that conserves water and money while producing peak yields.

As hints of water regulation on the horizon in Mississippi make water conservation a pressing issue, Mississippi State University has stepped up efforts to aid growers with irrigation decisions.

Trent Irby, soybean specialist with the MSU Extension Service, said soybean irrigation should stop after there is adequate soil moisture to ensure the seeds reach maximum size.

Trent Irby, left, demonstrated how to determine the maturity level of soybeans Aug. 30, 2013, at Mississippi State University's Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville. Producers can conserve water and save money on irrigation by correctly timing termination. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Bonnie Coblentz)
September 6, 2013 - Filed Under: Soybeans, Irrigation

STONEVILLE -- A group of soybean professionals met in Stoneville as harvest approached to learn how to be more efficient with irrigation at the end of the growing season.

Tom Eubank, a Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station soybean agronomist at the Delta Research and Extension Center, said soybean farmers need three pieces of information to know when to terminate irrigation.

Jason Krutz, irrigation specialist with Mississippi State University's Delta Research and Extension Center, says he believes that soil moisture sensors can save farmers money, conserve water and extend the life of irrigation pumps. Krutz is holding one of the sensors during the Corn and Soybean Field Day in Stoneville, Miss., on July 18, 2013. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
August 22, 2013 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Irrigation

STONEVILLE – When it comes to irrigating crops, farmers are like Goldilocks.

“They don’t want too much water; they don’t want too little water; they want it just right,” said Jason Krutz, irrigation specialist with Mississippi State University’s Delta Research and Extension Center.

Krutz explained that too much irrigation can damage a crop, drive costs up and reduce underground water supplies.

Microirrigation is an effective way to apply water directly to the root zones. Options include soaker hoses, drip tape and microsprinklers. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
May 20, 2013 - Filed Under: Irrigation, Lawn and Garden

Although many Mississippi gardeners are wondering if it will ever quit raining and let their landscapes dry out a bit, now is actually a good time to think ahead to the inevitable hot and dry weather of summer.

Dry conditions create problems for our home gardens and landscapes, and gardeners water their lawns and landscape beds a lot more than usual during these times.

Standing water between rows of corn at Mississippi State University's R.R. Foil Research Center in Starkville means the soil has no oxygen available to root systems. As soils dry out, the crop will need rain or irrigation to sustain growth. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
April 19, 2013 - Filed Under: Crops, Soils, Irrigation

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Springtime’s soggy fields are no guarantee that summer’s row crops will have the moisture they need to thrive until harvest in the fall.

Jason Krutz, irrigation specialist with the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, said winter and spring rain helps recharge the soil profile, but moisture must be replenished during the growing season.

“In the Delta in the summer, we’re always 10 days from a drought,” Kurtz said. “If you go 10 days without rain, your row crops are in trouble and you will have to irrigate.”

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