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Feature Story from 2000

November 6, 2000 - Filed Under: Family

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Marking the holidays with food, family, more food and more guests is usually enjoyable for the guests, but it can be a hassle to the hosts.

Cooking for a crowd is not a task for the faint hearted. Menus must be carefully planned, entertainment coordinated, guest lists drawn up and accommodations arranged. While a primary concern often is how to do this without blowing the budget, a secondary concern is how to do this while staying sane.

November 6, 2000 - Filed Under: Food

By Chantel Lott

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Melissa Mixon, human nutrition specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service, said since mail-order food gifts are increasing in popularity, consumers need to be aware of the precautions necessary to mail a perishable item.

November 6, 2000 - Filed Under: Family

By Chantel Lott

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Pre-holiday clothing shopping is a joy compared to the frustration of battling lines at the returns counter when buyers fail to be good detectives.

Each holiday shopping season people stare at rack after rack of clothing in a store wondering which style is best for that special person. The next dilemma is guessing the right size.

If possible, sneak a visit to their closet to take some of the guesswork out of gift buying.

November 13, 2000 - Filed Under: Equine

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- A new equestrian team at Mississippi State University offers collegiate riders of all skill levels the opportunity to improve their abilities and compete against other colleges across the region.

Molly Nicodemus, team advisor and assistant professor of animal and dairy sciences, said MSU and Wood College in Mathiston have the only equestrian teams in the state and both are in their first year. Currently, no scholarships are available at MSU, but fund-raising activities will minimize competition costs.

November 13, 2000 - Filed Under: Fire Ants

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippians may be familiar with the results of fire ant bites, but official documentation has not been available until recently.

The Nov. 1 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association has published a photo/essay documenting the "Evolution of the Fire Ant Lesion."

November 13, 2000 - Filed Under: Farm Safety

By Crystel Bailey

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Christmas lights draped along the roof, the smell of pine from live Christmas trees, flames bursting from the den window...wait! Flames bursting from the den window?

The sights and smells of Christmas add flavor to the holiday season, but if decorations are not used safely, the outcome could be deadly. To avoid safety hazards with decorations, follow these precautions to prevent fires caused by misusing Christmas trees and lights.

Cut about 1 inch off the base of a store-bought, live tree.

November 13, 2000 - Filed Under: Health

By Chantel Lott

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Control diabetes during the holiday season by balancing food, activity and medication.

"The first rule should be that no foods are forbidden," said Melissa Mixon, human nutrition specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service. "Accept the fact that the holidays bring challenges. Plan from beginning to end how to handle them.

"Enjoy your favorite holiday food, but remember moderation is the key," Mixon said.

November 13, 2000 - Filed Under: Fire Ants

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippians may be familiar with the results of fire ant bites, but official documentation has not been available until recently.

The Nov. 1 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association has published a photo/essay documenting the "Evolution of the Fire Ant Lesion."

November 13, 2000 - Filed Under: Wood Products

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi State University put on display its unique hot press, one of just nine operating in North America.

In early November, MSU's Forest Products Laboratory demonstrated its composites hot press in an open house for representatives of different industries. Composite boards can be made of combinations of wood, agricultural fibers and recycled materials, including plastics.

November 20, 2000 - Filed Under: Water

By Chantel Lott

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Many Mississippians breathed a sigh of relief when rains fell across the state, but more rain is necessary to replenish the state's water level.

"The rains in mid-November are what we would call a major rainfall event," said Charles Wax, head of geosciences at Mississippi State University and state climatologist.

November 20, 2000 - Filed Under: Agriculture

By Bonnie Coblentz

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Decisions made in Washington, D.C., Brussels and Tokyo affect everyone, a fact not lost on Mississippi farmers impacted by international trade policies.

November 20, 2000 - Filed Under: Pets

By Crystel Bailey

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- See Spot scratch. See Spot chew and lick his skin.

Dogs who acts like Spot may have allergies. Mississippi State University's College of Veterinary Medicine specialists, Cory Langston, in community practice, and Juli Gunter, in veterinary dermatology, offered clues to determine if a dog has allergies.

November 20, 2000 - Filed Under: Pesticide Applicator Certification

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- The success of a recent waste pesticide collection in Sunflower County demonstrated Delta farmers' commitment to protecting the environment and the need for similar programs in the future.

November 27, 2000 - Filed Under: Health

By Chantel Lott

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Breast cancer is a leading cause of death in women in Mississippi, but early detection and treatment mean a better chance for survival.

"Many women think that breast cancer will never affect them, but it can happen to anyone at anytime," said Linda Patterson, health and safety specialist with Mississippi State University's Extension Service.

November 27, 2000 - Filed Under: Flower Gardens

By Crystel Bailey

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi gardeners and landscapers no longer have to travel several states away to see which new flowers will qualify as the best varieties, now that Poplarville is named an All-America Selection trial ground site.

In August, the All-America Selection board of directors voted the Poplarville display garden at the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station's Coastal Research and Extension Center to be an All-America Selection trial ground for flowering plants. It is the only such garden between Georgia and Texas.

November 27, 2000 - Filed Under: Trees

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Researchers at Mississippi State University are collecting samples of cottonwood trees in the Southeast to preserve the genetic diversity of this species.

Eastern cottonwood is an important contributor to forestry in the United States and other countries, with attributes that make it potentially even more important in the future. Timber industries have traditionally been attracted to it because it is fast-growing and can be grown from cuttings.

December 4, 2000 - Filed Under: Poultry

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi State University hasn't entered the poultry business, but it does have a new, state-of-the-art, working broiler facility for research purposes.

The 43-by-400 foot broiler house on the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station's South Farm took in its first chicks in mid-October. The climate-controlled facility is operated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agriculture Research Service at MSU.

December 4, 2000 - Filed Under: Pets

By Chantel Lott

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Dalmatians can make great movies, but they are not necessarily the best pet choice.

With the latest dalmatian movie hitting theaters in time for Christmas, many parents may consider getting a dalmatian as a family dog. John Harkness, laboratory animal veterinarian at Mississippi State University's College of Veterinary Medicine, said dalmatians are not ideally suited for family settings.

"They have several characteristics that lessen their appeal as the family dog," Harkness said.

December 4, 2000 - Filed Under: Community

By Crystel Bailey

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Thad and Judy Buck, an attorney and a housewife from West Point, give the gift of hospitality to people from all over the world, and in return, the value of kindness is instilled in those they touch.

The Bucks, who live about 25 miles from Mississippi State University, open their home throughout the year to international students who attend MSU.

December 11, 2000 - Filed Under: Poultry, Water Quality

By Crystel Bailey

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Poultry production can decrease the water quality in places where people like to swim and fish, but agricultural specialists are taking steps to manage this problem in Mississippi.

Poultry, Mississippi's No. 1 agricultural product, produces a massive amount of manure, or litter. To use this by-product, producers distribute the litter as phosphorous-rich fertilizer on pastures and forage crops. Excess phosphorous can move into the soil and eventually find its way into surface water.

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