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Tips on using fire ant baits successfully

  • Only use baits that are specifically labeled for fire ants.
  • Read the label twice, once before you buy and again before you treat.
  • Apply fire ant baits by broadcasting them over the entire yard.
  • Don’t apply too much. The rate for most baits is only one to two pounds per acre.
  • Use a spreader specifically designed for fire ant bait.
  • Avoid irrigating for at least two days after applying baits.
  • Try to avoid applying baits just before rainfall.
  • Treat again if rainfall occurs within 12 hours after a bait application.
  • Use fresh bait. Ants don’t like old bait that has gone rancid.
  • Be patient. Baits are slow-acting.
  • Apply fire ant baits preventively. Don’t wait till you see large mounds.
  • Apply baits one to three times per year, depending on location.
  • Use the holidays, Easter, Independence Day, and Labor Day as reminders.
  • Use individual mound treatments to eliminate mounds the baits miss.

Contact information for Dr. Blake Layton.

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News

A person holds a canister of dry powder pesticide and a measuring spoon of powder over a fire ant mound.
Filed Under: Fire Ants, Insects-Home Lawns, Insects-Pests, Turfgrass and Lawn Management September 11, 2018

Even if you preventatively treat your yard periodically through the year for fire ants, you’ll still see mounds pop up.

There are two ways to treat these mounds: liquid drenches and dry powders. (File photo by MSU Extension Service.)

A close-up of gloved hands pouring a liquid drench pesticide into a measuring cup.
Filed Under: Fire Ants, Insects-Home Lawns, Insects-Pests, Turfgrass and Lawn Management August 28, 2018

Fire ant mounds always pop up right where you don’t need them – in the flower bed you planned to weed tomorrow, next to the mailbox that needs to be reset, and near the patio where you are throwing a party tonight. (Photo by Brian Utley/Cindy Callahan)

A close-up of a fire ant mound.
Filed Under: Commercial Horticulture, Livestock, Pets, Fire Ants, Insects-Home Lawns, Insects-Pests, Turfgrass and Lawn Management, Vegetable Gardens August 10, 2018

Fire ants are everywhere. If you’ve thrown your hands up in exasperation trying to deal with them, don’t give up just yet. (File photo by MSU Extension Service)

A paper wasp on a multi-cell nest.
Filed Under: Insects-Crop Pests, Insects-Forage Pests, Fire Ants, Household Insects, Insect Identification, Termites, Insects-Home Lawns, Insects-Pests July 31, 2018

Mississippi has an abundance of bugs, especially in the warmer months. We are all familiar with mosquitoes, bumblebees, and house flies. But I bet there are bugs around your house and yard that you can’t identify. (Photo by Blake Layton)

Invasive fire ants crawl over a mound of soil. (File photo by MSU Extension/Kat Lawrence)
Filed Under: Fire Ants November 8, 2017

Just when we think we’ve conquered our tiny foes, it rains, and fresh fire ant mounds pop up in our yard.

Like many tasks around the house, fighting fire ants feels like a constant battle. My husband and I finally started seeing some progress when we followed recommendations from MSU Extension’s expert, Dr. Blake Layton. (Yeah, that’s a side benefit of my job, learning all kinds of practical information!)

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Fire Ant Control - MSU Extension Service
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Fire Ant Control

Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - 1:45pm

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Entomology; extension insect identification; fire ants; termites; insect pests in the home, lawn and