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Boron Deficiency

Boron deficiency is perhaps wrongly accused of more problems than any other nutrient. Boron is very water soluble and deficiency is related to soil type, soil resource regions, organic matter content and timing of lime materials (pH). Symptoms are generally distinct, and descriptions of this disorder are quite similar across a larger range of environments. Petioles of younger leaves will be short and thick, with dark concentric bands along their length. It appears that the gossypol glands line up and arrange themselves in a "coon tail" arrangement. Flowers may also be distorted in shape. With severe boron deficiency, the terminal may be aborted or become deformed. The pith inside petioles of leaves or bolls may turn brown. Boron is required for normal flower development. Flower and boll shedding may increase as the level of deficiency increases.

Local University and Extension recommendations for boron applications should be followed closely. Some states recommend larger quantities of boron than others. In Misssissippi boron is recommended on hill area soils, recently limed soils and low organic matter sandy soils of the Delta. Generally the Delta region does not respond to boron. Sometimes irrigation water will contain sufficient levels of boron. Not all square, flower or boll shedding is due to boron deficiency problems. Follow your local recommendations with this micronutrient.

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News

Close-up of a cotton plant.
Filed Under: Agriculture, Cotton August 30, 2021

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- When the calendar turns to September, many who call Mississippi home long for cooler temperatures to relieve the summer’s heat, but the state’s cotton growers want high temperatures and dry weather to drag into October.

Water stands in a corn field
Filed Under: Crops, Corn, Cotton, Soybeans, Disaster Response June 24, 2021

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- MSU Extension agents will be assessing agricultural damage from early-June flooding until well into July, but preliminary estimates indicate losses could break records.

The 2019 Yazoo Backwater Area flood caused $617 million in crop damage alone. It looks like the more recent flood will exceed those losses.

Heavy rainfall, primarily north of U.S. Highway 82, throughout the second week of June waterlogged crops during critical growth stages. Flooding caused complete or partial losses in many fields.

 A man in a hat kneels among straw to point at tiny plants.
Filed Under: Crops, Corn, Cotton, Rice, Soybeans May 20, 2021

Because it is the first crop planted starting in March, Mississippi corn is in much better shape than other row crops struggling with the challenges of wet, cool weather.

Graphic showing 2021 planting intentions
Filed Under: Agriculture, Corn, Cotton, Rice, Soybeans April 1, 2021

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Mississippi row crop growers are planning to plant more soybeans and corn in 2021 than they did last year but not as much cotton, rice or hay.

The National Agricultural Statistics Service, a branch of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, publishes its planting intentions report each year at the end of March. This report provides a state-by-state estimation of how many acres of corn, soybeans, wheat and cotton farmers will plant in the upcoming growing season.

Filed Under: Agriculture, Corn, Cotton, Grains, Rice, Soybeans, Sweet Potatoes, Agri-tourism, Beekeeping, Equine, Goats and Sheep, Poultry, Swine, Turfgrass and Lawn Management, Vegetable Gardens, Forestry February 2, 2021

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Each February marks the occasion for producers to share their research and programming needs with Mississippi State University agricultural specialists in person.

To comply with COVID-19 social distancing guidelines, the opportunity will be extended virtually this year.

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