You are here

Boron Deficiency

Boron deficiency is perhaps wrongly accused of more problems than any other nutrient. Boron is very water soluble and deficiency is related to soil type, soil resource regions, organic matter content and timing of lime materials (pH). Symptoms are generally distinct, and descriptions of this disorder are quite similar across a larger range of environments. Petioles of younger leaves will be short and thick, with dark concentric bands along their length. It appears that the gossypol glands line up and arrange themselves in a "coon tail" arrangement. Flowers may also be distorted in shape. With severe boron deficiency, the terminal may be aborted or become deformed. The pith inside petioles of leaves or bolls may turn brown. Boron is required for normal flower development. Flower and boll shedding may increase as the level of deficiency increases.

Local University and Extension recommendations for boron applications should be followed closely. Some states recommend larger quantities of boron than others. In Misssissippi boron is recommended on hill area soils, recently limed soils and low organic matter sandy soils of the Delta. Generally the Delta region does not respond to boron. Sometimes irrigation water will contain sufficient levels of boron. Not all square, flower or boll shedding is due to boron deficiency problems. Follow your local recommendations with this micronutrient.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

News

Rows of peanut plants.
Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Rice, Soybeans, Wheat, Forages July 6, 2020

Cotton and corn acreage in Mississippi are more than 30% below March projections, while growers of soybeans and peanuts planted much more than initially forecasted.

Leaves of young cotton plants.
Filed Under: Agriculture, Corn, Cotton, Rice, Soybeans May 29, 2020

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Row crop growers in Mississippi used a relatively dry May to make up for planting time lost earlier in the spring due to wet weather and soggy fields.

As of May 24, planting progress for the state’s four major row crops was slightly behind their five-year averages but ahead of where it was at that time in 2019.

Filed Under: About Extension, Cotton April 14, 2020

The Mississippi State University Extension Service has a new cotton specialist.

Brian Pieralisi was appointed to that role on April 1. He replaced Darrin Dodds, who took the helm of the university’s Department of Plant and Soil Sciences.

Graphic showing 2020 planting intentions
Filed Under: Agriculture, Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Rice, Soybeans, Forages, Coronavirus March 31, 2020

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Weather always plays a role in the spring planting decisions of Mississippi row-crop producers, but the market impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is another variable they will have to consider in 2020.

A tall, green weed in the foreground with a cloudy sky and cotton field in the background.
Filed Under: Crops, Cotton March 2, 2020

STONEVILLE, Miss. -- Pathologists with Mississippi State University will be monitoring a relatively new plant disease in state cotton fields once the growing season is in full swing.

Cotton leafroll dwarf virus, or CLRDV, was first reported in Alabama in 2017. It is closely related to a cotton virus known to occur in South America. Historically, that virus has caused up to 80 percent yield losses in Brazilian cotton fields.

Watch

Farmweek, Entire Show, October 9, 2015
Farmweek

Season 39 Show #14

Thursday, October 8, 2015 - 7:00pm
Farmweek Entire Show,  September 4, 2015
Farmweek

Season 39 Show #09

Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 7:00pm

Contact Your County Office

Your Extension Experts

Portrait of Dr. Darrin Dodds
Professor and Head
Cotton Agronomics