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Fire Ant Control In Commercial Fruits, Nuts and Vegetables

Fire ants are serious pests in commercial fruits, nuts, and vegetables, where they can cause a wide range of problems.  Not only do they sting field workers and interfere with harvest and other hand labor operations, they also cause direct damage to crops such as okra or potatoes, and sometimes damage young trees by chewing through tender bark.  Fire ants especially like to nest beneath plastic row covers in the winter and spring because of the increased warmth and protection they provide.  Fire ants sometimes chew through irrigation tubing and cause damage to other equipment, either due to physical damage cause by their mounds, or by causing shorts in irrigation timers and other electrical equipment.  Fire ants are especially unwelcomed in pick-your-own fruit and vegetable farms because of their ability to turn an enjoyable family experience into a, still memorable but far less pleasant experience that may make clients less likely to plan return visits.

Granular baits can be used to control fire ants, but only a few baits are labeled for use around food crops—be sure you use a bait that is. Baits work well, but they work slowly, so it is important to apply them preventively. See Extension Publication 2494, Control Fire Ants in Commercial Fruits, Nuts, and Vegetables for recommended bait treatments and how to apply them. Read the section on Fire Ant Biology to learn more about how and why baits work.

Contact information for Dr. Blake Layton.

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A person holds a canister of dry powder pesticide and a measuring spoon of powder over a fire ant mound.
Filed Under: Fire Ants, Insects-Home Lawns, Insects-Pests, Turfgrass and Lawn Management September 11, 2018

Even if you preventatively treat your yard periodically through the year for fire ants, you’ll still see mounds pop up.

There are two ways to treat these mounds: liquid drenches and dry powders. (File photo by MSU Extension Service.)

A close-up of gloved hands pouring a liquid drench pesticide into a measuring cup.
Filed Under: Fire Ants, Insects-Home Lawns, Insects-Pests, Turfgrass and Lawn Management August 28, 2018

Fire ant mounds always pop up right where you don’t need them – in the flower bed you planned to weed tomorrow, next to the mailbox that needs to be reset, and near the patio where you are throwing a party tonight. (Photo by Brian Utley/Cindy Callahan)

A close-up of a fire ant mound.
Filed Under: Commercial Horticulture, Livestock, Pets, Fire Ants, Insects-Home Lawns, Insects-Pests, Turfgrass and Lawn Management, Vegetable Gardens August 10, 2018

Fire ants are everywhere. If you’ve thrown your hands up in exasperation trying to deal with them, don’t give up just yet. (File photo by MSU Extension Service)

A paper wasp on a multi-cell nest.
Filed Under: Insects-Crop Pests, Insects-Forage Pests, Fire Ants, Household Insects, Insect Identification, Termites, Insects-Home Lawns, Insects-Pests July 31, 2018

Mississippi has an abundance of bugs, especially in the warmer months. We are all familiar with mosquitoes, bumblebees, and house flies. But I bet there are bugs around your house and yard that you can’t identify. (Photo by Blake Layton)

Invasive fire ants crawl over a mound of soil. (File photo by MSU Extension/Kat Lawrence)
Filed Under: Fire Ants November 8, 2017

Just when we think we’ve conquered our tiny foes, it rains, and fresh fire ant mounds pop up in our yard.

Like many tasks around the house, fighting fire ants feels like a constant battle. My husband and I finally started seeing some progress when we followed recommendations from MSU Extension’s expert, Dr. Blake Layton. (Yeah, that’s a side benefit of my job, learning all kinds of practical information!)

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Fire Ant Control - MSU Extension Service
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Fire Ant Control

Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - 1:45pm

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Entomology; extension insect identification; fire ants; termites; insect pests in the home, lawn and