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Scholarships for 4-H

4-H participation and involvement leads young people to explore various careers and educational options. For those young people who choose to further their education, Mississippi State University, Mississippi 4-H Youth Development and the Mississippi 4-H Foundation offers scholarships that will help support 4-H’ers with their educational goals.

4-H currently offers the following scholarships:

  • Ike Campbell Memorial 4-H Scholarship - PDF - Word
  • Mississippi 4-H Volunteer Leaders Association Youth Scholarship - PDF - Word
  • Deep South Equipment Dealers Association 4-H Scholarship - PDF - Word
  • Gladiola Branscome Harris 4-H Scholarship - PDF - Word
  • The J. K. Morgan 4-H Scholarship - PDF - Word
  • Marian Carmichael 4-H Scholarship - PDF - Word
  • The Troy and Mildred Holliday 4-H Scholarship - PDF - Word

Eligibility:

The 4-H scholarship program recognizes those 4-H members who have been successful in their 4-H project experiences. All of the scholarships will be reviewed and the winners are selected based on the specific criteria set in place by donors. Keep in mind that each scholarship offered has its own eligibility criteria. The amount of each scholarship is set according to the current market interest rates. The deadline for all of the 4-H scholarships is April 1 of the current year. 

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Publications

Publication Number: P1456
Publication Number: P3152
Publication Number: F0636

News

Hunter wearing camouflage secures a portable platform to the side of a tree.
Filed Under: 4-H Safety Programs, White-Tailed Deer December 1, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Although they are beneficial as a hunting tool to increase visibility, elevated tree stands come with many safety concerns.

Fortunately, it is easier than ever to hunt safely from trees. When using a tree stand, design choice and placement location are your most important decisions. Finding a healthy, large tree with no visible signs of damage or rot is essential when using fixed, permanent or ladder-style tree stands. These stands require a sturdy base to mount and climbing gear to reach ideal hunting height.

A hunter in camouflage and an orange vest places his rifle into storage on the back of an ATV in the woods.
Filed Under: ATV Safety November 30, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Hunting and driving all-terrain vehicles are so linked in Mississippi that many people forget safety precautions when using these powerful machines.

Bradley Staton, Mississippi State University Extension Service 4-H ATV associate, offered a few tips to increase the chances that people will have a safe time in the woods on ATVs.

"Always wear protective gear," Staton said. "That means a helmet to protect the head if you lose control and flip the ATV, and appropriate clothing, including long sleeves, a jacket and boots. And, since it's hunting season, always wear an orange vest so others hunters in the same area can see you."

A woman stands in front of several award ribbons.
Filed Under: 4-H, Women for Agriculture November 21, 2017

INDIANOLA, Miss. -- Learning how to show pigs in 4-H livestock competitions made a leader out of Sarah Thomas Smith.

Smith, 17, is a junior at Indianola Academy in Sunflower County, Mississippi. She has been an active member of the Sunflower County Livestock 4-H club since 2010.

Five people stand in a row holding their awards.
Filed Under: 4-H November 17, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- The first Mississippi team ever to compete in the North American International Livestock Exposition came home with a first-place win in the evaluation division.

The four-member team was an all-star group of 4-H members made up of winners of the premier exhibitors’ competition at the Dixie National Livestock Show in February. The national event was held in Louisville, Kentucky, with teams from 19 states competing Nov. 13-15.

Close-up photo of a brown and white owl as it looks off to the right.
Filed Under: Wildlife Youth Education, Wildlife November 17, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. – What do Harry Potter, Winnie the Pooh, the U.S. Forest Service, Tootsie Pops and Xyzal have in common? All prominently feature owls in their stories and marketing campaigns.

Some owls help sell products such as lollipops and allergy medications. Others sell ideas, like the Forest Service's Woodsy Owl -- "Give a Hoot, Don't Pollute." Harry had a pet owl named Hedwig, and Winnie had a friend named Owl.

Success Stories

Man in green dress shirt sits at a table with a woman in a white dress
4-H Extension Matters: Volume 3 Number 4

Tiara and Jeremy Brown, former 4-H’ers from Clay and Oktibbeha Counties, respectively, discuss how the 4-H youth development program has something for everyone.

Tiara and Jeremy are both from families that were very involved in 4-H. They met while attending Mississippi State University, graduated, and married. Jeremy went on to work as a mechanical engineer at Yokohama Tire Manufacturing in West Point, and Tiara works as a special education teacher at Central School, also in West Point.

Three women and one man hold a large 4-H clover
STEM – Science Technology Engineering and Math, Volunteers Extension Matters: Volume 3 Number 4

When she started volunteering with Tate County 4-H almost 15 years ago, Joy Magness didn’t know much about the youth development program delivered by the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

She was home-schooling her two children, Samantha and Eli, and her fellow home-schooling parent and friend Adelia Gaines asked Magness if she’d like her kids to join 4-H and if she’d like to volunteer.

Pavilion surrounded by trees
4-H Extension Matters: Volume 3 Number 4

Arboretum Celebrates 20 Years with MSU Extension • Plant Disease and Nematode Analysis Fee Changes • Improving Mississippi’s Fiscal Health • Know Your Roots to Attract More Customers

a red and blue ribbon from the Neshoba County Fair
4-H, Commercial Horticulture Extension Matters: Volume 3 Number 4

When Mississippi’s Giant Houseparty kicked off at the end of July, hundreds of exhibitors displayed thousands of items that showcase their handiwork to the Neshoba County Fair’s many visitors.

The Exhibit Hall, organized and operated by the Neshoba County office of the Mississippi State University Extension Service, annually displays the handiwork of adults and children in several categories, including fresh fruits and vegetables, field crops, food preservation, arts and crafts, posters, and food and nutrition.  

White horse stands beside teen boy with blue dress shirt and black cowboy hat
4-H Extension Matters: Volume 3 Number 4

Noah Carpenter will tell you himself that he wouldn’t have the life skills he has today if not for 4-H.

“My involvement in 4-H has taught me responsibility, teamwork, and leadership skills,” he says. “I’m better at communicating with others because I’ve built self-confidence through showing horses.”

Listen

Monday, November 20, 2017 - 2:30am
Wednesday, October 4, 2017 - 2:00am
Monday, October 2, 2017 - 2:00am

Contact Your County Office

Your Extension Experts

Assc Dir, FCS & 4H & Ext Prof
Associate Director FCS/4H