You are here

Biotechnology

Printer Friendly and PDF

Publications

News

A 3-D printer allows veterinarians to look at spinal and skull injuries in animals and find new ways to correct them. Students and residents benefit from being able to observe and inspect models of different types of spinal and skull injuries. (Photo by MSU College of Veterinary Medicine/Tom Tompson)
June 16, 2015 - Filed Under: Biotechnology, Technology

Veterinarians at the Mississippi State University Veterinary Specialty Center (VSC) are using 3-D printer technology to make models of spinal and skull injuries that help them develop better treatments for their animal patients.

The VSC purchased a Lutzbot Taz 4 3-D printer last year, and it is now one of the center’s most valuable pieces of equipment. Three-dimensional models from the printer allow specialists and practicing veterinarians to view internal trauma without the use of invasive procedures.

Jean Feugang, a research assistant professor in the Mississippi State University Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences, microinjects a quantum dot into an ovarian follicle to monitor the egg's release from the follicle and eventual fertilization. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
August 30, 2013 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Biotechnology

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi State University scientists are working to find out why some pregnancies are successful and others are not.

Jean Feugang, a research assistant professor in the Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences, is studying the reproductive stage that remains one of the most mysterious -- the time just before conception.

Alexis Parisi of Oxford, left, and Kate Thompson of Picayune are taking part in National Science Foundation research programs for elite undergraduate students. Working in a laboratory in the Mississippi State University Department of Animal and Dairy Science, both are studying reproduction issues. (Photo by MSU College of Veterinary Medicine/Tom Thompson)
July 26, 2013 - Filed Under: Biotechnology

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Their classmates may be taking the summer off, but two undergraduate students at Mississippi State University are spending long hours in a laboratory conducting studies that would challenge seasoned researchers.

Their supervisor, Erdogan Memili, is not surprised. He nominated Alexis Parisi and Kate Thompson for National Science Foundation research programs for elite undergraduates.

Mississippi State University researcher Natalie Calatayud checks on female Boreal toads hibernating in a laboratory refrigerator. Researchers found the toads will lay eggs in captivity after spending time in simulated conditions that mimic their native environment. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
July 25, 2013 - Filed Under: Biotechnology, Environment, Wildlife

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi State University researchers successfully promoted egg laying in threatened Boreal toads when they moved the amphibians out of the refrigerator and into the wine chiller.

Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station researchers at MSU are working with a group of 52 threatened Boreal toads native to the Colorado Rockies. The toads are housed in a special lab in the MSU Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology and Plant Pathology.

The Mississippi gopher frog is one of the most critically endangered species in North America. Mississippi State University is trying to learn how to get its 34 adult gopher frogs to breed in captivity. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
July 18, 2013 - Filed Under: Biotechnology, Environment, Wildlife

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi State University has joined the ranks of conservationists trying to increase the population of one of the most critically endangered species living in North America.

Mississippi gopher frogs are native to south Mississippi, and for a time, the only known colony living and breeding in the wild was living in one Harrison County pond. They have since been found living near three other ponds in the DeSoto National Forest, bringing the total known wild population to an estimated 100-200 gopher frogs.

Contact Your County Office

Your Extension Experts

Professor and Head