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Site Selection and soil preparation for perennials

Consider the site before selecting your plants. Although many perennials, such as ferns, tolerate heavy shade, most perennial plants require abundant sunshine. Air circulation is important for avoiding diseases; stagnant, warm, and humid air creates ideal conditions for diseases. Perennial plants also require properly prepared soil, and a few have specific drainage and fertility requirements.

Soil preparation for perennials is similar to soil preparation for annuals. However, you should devote some special attention to perennial bed preparation, because plants may occupy the site for several years with little opportunity to correct any problems. When possible, add sand and organic matter such as bark, peat, or compost to soils well ahead of planting time.

A layer of organic matter 3 or 4 inches deep, worked into the soil a shovel's depth, is usually adequate. Since different types of organic matter work and decompose at different rates in the soil, it is best to use a little of two or three kinds of organic matter than a lot of just one.

Soil testing provides specific recommendations for fertilizer and lime needs. Since lime lasts for several years depending on the type used, never add lime without a soil test. Many fertilizers, such as phosphorus, are best applied and mixed into soils before planting. Perennials need a balance of several nutrients, including nitrogen, phosphorous, and potash; most garden supply stores carry a wide variety of fertilizer mixes. Keep in mind that phosphorus, including that found in bone meal, lasts for several years and need not be applied regularly.

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Publication Number: IS0204
Publication Number: p3121
Publication Number: P3099
Publication Number: P3115

News

American beautyberry, a native shrub with tiny flowers and prolific berries, is excellent in home landscapes.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens October 16, 2017

After cleaning the mess from Hurricane Nate, I had the chance to participate in two outstanding field days in Mississippi and Louisiana. I really enjoyed the plantings at the LSU AgCenter Hammond Research Station and the Mississippi State University Truck Crops Branch Experiment Station in Crystal Springs.

These events inspired me to share ideas over the next several weeks for great plants to put in your garden and landscape that you will enjoy next fall.

 Several blue containers in this colorful landscape garden are blown over after heavy storm winds.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens October 9, 2017

While Hurricane Nate was obviously not in the same class as Katrina, the last hurricane to hit the Mississippi Gulf Coast, it did provide gardeners a lesson in getting their landscapes ready before a storm.

I know it’s a bit backwards to wait until after the storm to make a list of tips to get your garden ready ahead of time. But this was the first hurricane I’ve experienced since moving to the Gulf Coast, and I’ve been thinking what I could have done better in advance.

Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Landscape and Garden Design, Landscape Management, Environment October 6, 2017

Gardeners can purchase hard-to-find native plants during the Crosby Arboretum’s popular Fall Native Plant Sale.

The semiannual sale will be Oct. 21 and 22 at the arboretum. It begins at 10 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. Arboretum members can enter at 9 a.m. Admission is free.

Toucan Rose canna flowers in a garden landscape with shades of pink and dark red are brightened by sunlight.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens October 2, 2017

Cannas are commonly grown as large-specimen plants and look fantastic mass planted in landscapes. Their tropical-looking foliage lends bold texture to the space until the flowers steal the show from summer through fall.

In fact, the cannas I have planted in my Ocean Springs landscape right now are looking the best they have so far this year.

Backlit Gulf Muhly grass glows like a rich, pink cloud in this landscape.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens September 25, 2017

I know some homeowners who look at ornamental grasses and wonder what is the big deal; these plants are only grass. But when fall rolls around, many of these naysayers change their opinion 180 degrees.

Fall is a great time to appreciate ornamental grasses, as their flower plumes, actually called inflorescences, really pop out in their full glory.

One of the best and showier grasses is not a selection that was bred for any particular characteristic. I’m talking about Gulf Muhly grass, a Mississippi native grass that really struts its stuff in the fall and winter.

Watch

Killer Cool Color
Southern Gardening

Killer Cool Color

Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 2:00am
Copious Coleus Color
Southern Gardening

Copious Coleus Color

Sunday, September 24, 2017 - 1:00am
Roundabout Color
Southern Gardening

Roundabout Color

Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 1:00am
Burgandy and Silver
Southern Gardening

Burgandy and Silver

Sunday, September 10, 2017 - 1:00am
Landscape Gold
Southern Gardening

Landscape Gold

Sunday, September 3, 2017 - 1:00am

Listen

Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 1:00am
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 1:00am
Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 1:00am
Monday, October 16, 2017 - 1:00am
Friday, October 13, 2017 - 1:00am

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