You are here

What varieties of muscadines should be grown?

Muscadine varieties can be divided into several categories:

Bronze or purple fruit - the fruit produced will either be bronze or purple in color.

Fresh market or Juice varieties - Fresh market varieties have large fruit and are good for fresh consumption. Although the fruit is larger, the vine usually produces less fruit than the juice varieties. However, the pounds per vine may be similar. Juice varieties produce large amounts of smaller fruit that is ideal for the production of juice, jelly, jam, or wine. The fruit quality is often just as good as the fresh market varieties, but the fruit size is smaller.

Self fertile or female flowers - a muscadine variety will produce either female or imperfect flowers (only female flower parts) or self fertile, perfect flowers (male and female flower parts). Vines with imperfect flowers must have a vine with perfect flowers nearby in order for pollination to occur. An imperfect flowered vine will not have fruit if a pollen source is not located nearby. One perfect flowered vine can pollinate eight surrounding imperfect flowered vines. In a single row planting, every third vine should be a pollinator.

The following are some recommended muscadine varieties:

Alachua - Purple, medium size, excellent muscadine flavor, self fertile, dry stem scar, fresh fruit quality. Leesburg, Fl 1990.

Black Beauty - Purple, crunchy skin, large size, excellent flavor, female, good yields, extended harvest, excellent vigor, fresh fruit quality. Ison, 1988.

Black Fry - Purple, large, female, good vigor, medium-tough skin, excellent flavor, fresh fruit quality. Ison, 1986.

Carlos - Bronze, tough skin, medium size, good flavor, self fertile, high yields, excellent juice quality. Raliegh, N.C. 1970.

Cowart - Medium size, tough skin, purple, good flavor, self fertile, uneven ripening, long season, good juice quality. Experiment, Ga. 1968.

Darlene - Bronze, large fruit, medium-tough skin, good flavor, low vigor, female, excellent fresh fruit quality. Ison, 1988.

Dixieland - Bronze, medium large, excellent flavor, medium-tough skin, self fertile, unpredictable yields, good fresh fruit quality. Ison, 1976.

Doreen - Bronze, tough skin, medium size, good flavor, self fertile, high yields, excellent juice quality. Mississippi State University, 1981.

Fry - Bronze, medium large size, good flavor, crunchy skin, female, susceptible to disease (must spray for disease control), cold sensitive, low vigor, excellent fresh fruit quality. Experiment, Ga. 1970

Fry Seedless - Bronze, good flavor, skin moderately tough, light purple coloration, must be sprayed with gibberellic acid to achieve a marketable size. Ison, 1990.

Granny Val - Bronze, medium-tough skin, large size, late maturing, good flavor, self fertile, uniform ripening, sensitive to cold weather, good fresh fruit quality. Brooks, Ga. 1983.

Higgins - Bronze, medium size, tough skin, good flavor, female, good juice quality, Experiment, Ga. 1955.

Hunt - Purple, medium size, good flavor, medium-tough skin, female, good juice quality. Experiment, Ga. 1920.

Ison - Purple, medium large size, excellent muscadine flavor, medium-tough skin, self fertile, uniform ripening, good pollinator, good yields, good fresh fruit quality. Ison, 1986.

Janebell - Bronze, medium large fruit size, tough skin good sweet flavor, uneven ripening, self fertile, good fresh fruit quality. Ison, 1988.

Jumbo - Purple, large size, good flavor, female, good fresh fruit quality, tough skin a drawback. Experiment, Ga. 1970.

Magnolia - Bronze, tough skin, medium size, good flavor, self fertile, excellent juice quality, Raleigh, N.C. 1962.

Noble - Purple, small to medium size fruit, good flavor, tough skin, self fertile, excellent juice quality. Clayton, N.C. 1973.

Scuppernong - Bronze, tough skin, medium size, good flavor, female, good juice quality, popular because of name recognition. Wild seedling.

Sterling - Bronze, tough skin, medium large size, self fertile, excellent juice quality. Clayton, N.C. 1981.

Sugargate - Medium large size, purple, inconsistent yield, good flavor, medium-tough skin, female, good fresh fruit quality. Ison, 1974.

Summit - Bronze, medium large fruit, excellent flavor, high sugar content, medium tough skin, female, very susceptible to black rot and bee problems, good fresh fruit potential. Experiment, Ga. 1977.

Supreme - Purple, large fruit, good flavor, medium-tough skin, heavy yield, female, excellentfresh fruit quality. Ison, 1988.

Sweet Jenny - Bronze, large size, excellent flavor, crunchy skin, female, excellent fresh fruit quality. Ison, 1986.

Triumph - Bronze, medium-tough skin, medium large size, good muscadine flavor, self fertile, nonslip skin, dry scar, excellent fresh fruit quality. Griffin, Ga. 1980.

Watergate - Bronze, large size, good flavor, medium-tough skin, uneven ripening, female, excellent fresh fruit quality. Ison, 1974.

Printer Friendly and PDF

Publications

Publication Number: P3055
Publication Number: IS1608
Publication Number: P0376

News

Filed Under: Commercial Horticulture, Commercial Fruit and Nuts, Farmers Markets, Greenhouse Tomatoes, Organic Fruit and Vegetables, Other Vegetables August 17, 2017

RAYMOND, Miss. -- Produce growers, packers, industry suppliers and others can learn the requirements of the new federal Produce Safety Rule during one of three upcoming workshops around the state.

Filed Under: Commercial Fruit and Nuts, Fruit August 4, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- A group interested in learning more about the ancient and popular art of winemaking will attend an upcoming workshop on the topic Sept. 15 at Mississippi State University.

The Growing, Making and Improving Wines Workshop will be at the A.B. McKay Food Research and Enology Laboratory on the MSU campus. The MSU Extension Service and the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station are offering the daylong workshop.

Filed Under: Commercial Fruit and Nuts, Fruit August 4, 2017

MCNEILL, Miss. -- Mississippi State University invites muscadine grape growers and those interested in growing these vines to an Aug. 26 field day in Pearl River County.

Topics for the annual Muscadine Field Day include pests, new varieties and vine management. MSU Extension Service, Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, and U.S. Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service personnel will speak.

Natasha Haynes, Mississippi State University Extension agent in Rankin County, advocates choosing one local ingredient to spotlight in a menu, such as this squash growing at the Southern Heritage Garden at the Vicksburg National Military Park on June 13, 2017. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Bonnie Coblentz)
Filed Under: Commercial Fruit and Nuts, Farmers Markets, Agri-tourism, Food, Nutrition July 12, 2017

VICKSBURG, Miss. -- Foods grown on Southern farms should end up on Southern tables, especially when those tables are in the state’s many historic bed-and-breakfasts.

That was the message Mississippi State University Extension Service personnel sent home with participants in a recent workshop.

“Nobody wants to go to a Southern B&B and not experience the food, so think about serving local foods,” said Brent Fountain, Extension nutrition specialist.

These blueberries at the Blueberry Patch in Starkville, Mississippi, are shown in a fruit coloring stage on May 17, 2017. Mostly warm winter conditions caused this year’s harvest to be unusually early in most parts of the state. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Kevin Hudson)
Filed Under: Commercial Fruit and Nuts, Fruit May 19, 2017

WAYNESBORO, Miss. -- The demand for fresh Mississippi blueberries may grow this year after a mid-March freeze hampered production in neighboring states.

Freezing temperatures during the crop's early growth stage on farms east of the state, especially in Georgia and North Carolina, caused production losses of up to 50 percent.

Meanwhile, 85 percent of Mississippi's blueberry crop was either in good or excellent condition as of May 15, according to a weekly crop progress and condition report published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Listen

Contact Your County Office

Your Extension Experts

Assoc Extension/Research Prof
Fruit Crops