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Feature Story from 2012

Photo by MSU College of Veterinary Medicine / Tom Thompson
July 26, 2012 - Filed Under: About Extension

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A doctoral student in Mississippi State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine has earned a national award for her parasitology research.

Dr. Flavia Girao Ferrari recently received the 2012 American Association of Veterinary Pathologists’ Merck Outstanding Graduate Student Award.

Mississippi farmers are counting on barges such as this one near the Port of Greenville on Wednesday, July 25, 2012, to continue accessing river ports to load and unload farm products. (Photo by MSU Delta Research and Extension Center/Rebekah Ray)
July 26, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi farmers may have survived one drought challenge only to face another as reduced river levels threaten a key transportation option.

Three exceptionally hot, dry weeks in June were taking a toll on the state’s crops when unseasonal July rains brought relief in time to salvage most fields. While Mississippi growers are not experiencing anything close to the dry conditions found across the nation’s Corn Belt, problems from the lack of water up north have trickled down to produce near-record lows on the Mississippi River.

The Borlaug Medallion was awarded to the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities during a celebration of the 150th anniversary of the Morrill Act, held in Washington, D.C. (Submitted Photo)
July 30, 2012 - Filed Under: Community

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi State University is one of 106 land-grant universities honored by the Borlaug Medallion given by the World Food Prize Foundation.

The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities received the award during a ceremony in Washington, D.C., celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Morrill Land-grant Act of 1862. This legislation awarded federal lands to help states establish public universities.

NASA associate administrator for education and former astronaut Leland Melvin spoke to Mississippi 4-H Summer of Innovation participants at a Stennis Space Center event on July 30, 2012. (Photo courtesy of NASA)
July 31, 2012 - Filed Under: 4-H

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi 4-H’ers celebrated a summer of hands-on science activities by meeting a former astronaut at the Stennis Space Center on July 30.

About 80 participants in the Mississippi State University Extension Service’s Summer of Innovation program heard Leland Melvin speak about his experiences as a professional football player, scientist and astronaut. Melvin is currently NASA’s associate administrator for education. NASA sponsors the Summer of Innovation program to increase student interest in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, topics.

Mississippi State University biologist David Ray and colleagues from the United States and Australia will map the genetic code of the reptile order that includes alligators and crocodiles. (Submitted photo.)
August 2, 2012 - Filed Under: Environment, Wildlife

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A Mississippi State University biologist’s fascination with crocodiles has brought together researchers from the United States and Australia to study the genetic building blocks of a reptile order.

In the process, they hope to discover ways to conserve endangered animals, harness the antibiotic properties of alligator blood and isolate the genes that determine gender.

Ponds, such as this one on Oktoc Road in Oktibbeha County, can provide recreation, wildlife habitat and improved water quality. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
August 2, 2012 - Filed Under: Environment, Fisheries

By Kaitlyn Byrne
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE — Mississippi’s 160,237 ponds offer more than mere recreation — they benefit the state’s economy and environment.

Most people envision ponds as small bodies of water that offer a peaceful view and recreational fishing opportunities, said Glynda Clardy, state wildlife biologist at U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service.

August 2, 2012 - Filed Under: Family

JACKSON – Usually the question of “what’s for dinner?” inspires a last-minute mad dash through the nearest supermarket for a quick and convenient meal or a call to the local pizza delivery restaurant. But planning meals in advance can save time and money, keep diets healthy and reduce food waste -- all while saving the cook’s sanity.

Pamela Redwine, nutrition and food safety area agent with Mississippi State University’s Yalobusha County Extension Service, said taking some time each week to plan a menu will save time later.

Dr. David Sherman, international veterinary medical consultant and clinical associate professor at Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine (far right), leads a session for Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine students on how veterinarians can improve global health. (Photo by MSU College of Veterinary Medicine/Tom Thompson)
August 9, 2012 - Filed Under: Animal Health

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Two global veterinary health experts visited the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine to show students how veterinarians protect animal and human health.

MSU-CVM students learned about international veterinary medicine’s opportunities and challenges from Dr. David Sherman, international veterinary medical consultant and clinical associate professor at Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, and Dr. Gary Vroegindewey, director of the Global Health Initiatives at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine.

Mississippi State University senior Elizabeth McDougald of Starkville and junior Brittany Sims of Kosciusko recently received the only two scholarships given by the American Institute of Floral Designers Foundation. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Kat Lawrence)
August 9, 2012 - Filed Under: Community

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Everything came up roses at a recent national conference for representatives of Mississippi State University’s floral design and management program.

Students and faculty in MSU’s floral management concentration in the horticulture program traveled to Miami to compete at the American Institute of Floral Designer’s annual meeting. While there, they received multiple honors.

While Smithville Schools are under construction due to tornado damage, teachers hold classes in temporary buildings and use computers donated by several organizations, including the Mississippi State University Extension Service. School officials expect to move into the reconstructed school for the 2013-2014 school year. (Photo by MSU Extension Center for Technology Outreach/Bekah Sparks)
August 9, 2012 - Filed Under: Community, Disaster Response, About Extension

MISSISSIPPI STATE – More than a year after a tornado ripped through the small town of Smithville, students are returning to temporary classrooms, but they still have access to current technology.

The Mississippi State University Extension Center for Technology Outreach, formerly known as Computer Applications and Services, donated 40 refurbished computers to the Monroe County School District for the schools in Smithville.

Lowndes County 4-H agent Sharon Patrick (left) provides safety support for Oktibbeha County Extension director Julie White during training for the Mississippi Youth Preparedness Initiative on Aug. 4, 2012, at Mississippi State University. Monticello Mayor Dave Nichols, the only Citizens Corps trainer qualified to certify trainers in Mississippi, supervises the hands-on lesson. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
August 9, 2012 - Filed Under: Disaster Response-Youth, Community, Disaster Preparedness

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Mississippi teens can soon be trained in disaster preparedness in their communities, something usually done by only a small percentage of adults.

Mississippi State University’s Extension Service is certifying trainers for the Mississippi Youth Preparedness Initiative, or MyPI. One goal is to teach teenagers how they can help themselves, their families, and their communities prepare for and respond to disasters.

The non-traditional "Faerie" F1 watermelon, with its yellow rind and sweet, red flesh, is a 2012 All-America Selection Vegetable Award winner. (Photo courtesy of All-America Selections)
August 9, 2012 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

MISSISSIPPI STATE – When a new plant becomes an overnight sensation in gardening circles, plant lovers who wonder how a previously unknown variety can end up with star status can turn to a Mississippi State University professor for the answer.

Rick Snyder, a vegetable specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service and Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, grows a garden of test vegetables as part of the All-America Selections program.

August 9, 2012 - Filed Under: Family, Children and Parenting

By Alicia Barnes
School of Human Sciences

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Distractions, fatigue and stress have contributed to the vehicular heatstroke deaths of an estimated 610 children over the past 21 years.

With fatalities occurring in the spring, summer, and fall every year, the Mississippi Child Care Resource and Referral Network at the Mississippi State University Extension Service wants parents and caregivers to be aware of the danger of children being left in vehicles.

Regular brushing can help pets avoid periodontal disease. College of Veterinary Medicine student Jenica Haraschak demonstrates proper tooth brushing on Darby. (Photo by MSU College of Veterinary Medicine/Tom Thompson)
August 9, 2012 - Filed Under: Pets

JACKSON – A pet’s bad breath is not just offensive; it could be a sign the animal has periodontal disease.

“By the age of 3 years, up to 80 percent of dogs and cats have some degree of periodontal disease if regular home care has not been done,” said Dr. Diana Eubanks, associate clinical professor at Mississippi State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

Dr. Phil Bushby (center) celebrates his Animal Welfare award from the American Veterinary Medical Association with Marcia P. Lane (left) and his wife Retha. Bushby holds the Marcia P. Lane Endowed Chair in Humane Ethics and Animal Welfare at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. (Submitted Photo)
August 13, 2012 - Filed Under: Animal Health

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A professor with the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine received national recognition from the American Veterinary Medical Association for his dedication to animal welfare.

Dr. Phil Bushby received the 2012 American Veterinary Medical Association’s Animal Welfare Award at the national convention in San Diego. He has taught at MSU since 1978 and holds the Marcia P. Lane Endowed Chair in Humane Ethics and Animal Welfare.

Members of the St. Martin High School 4-H Club won second place in the 2012 Great American Seafood Cook Off Aug. 12 in New Orleans with their Gulf Coast Bouillabaisse recipe, featuring Gulf Coast shrimp, blue crab, oysters, Wahoo fish and Mississippi-grown tomatoes. (Submitted Photo)
August 13, 2012 - Filed Under: 4-H

OCEAN SPRINGS – The St. Martin High School 4-H Club took second place in the 4-H edition of the Great American Seafood Cook-Off.

“I am so proud of them and their accomplishment,” said Evelyn DeAngelo, Jackson County 4-H Agent with Mississippi State University’s Extension Service. “I know they were a bit disappointed not to win first place, but their second place win paired with last year’s first place has established Mississippi as the team to beat in future competitions.”

From left, Roger Worsham, a tillage equipment vendor, reviews tillage options with Glenn Gilmer, a farmer from Caledonia, and Normie Buehring, a research professor with the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station. The three were taking part in the North Mississippi Row Crops Field Day Aug. 9, 2012, at the North Mississippi Research and Extension Center in Verona. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
August 14, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops

VERONA – Mississippi State University recently hosted the academic equivalent of a “baited field” for row-crop farmers, consultants, university researchers, Extension agents and industry representatives.

The North Mississippi Row Crops Field Day Aug. 9 provided the latest research information and recommendations for local producers at the North Mississippi Research and Extension Center in Verona. Participants also heard from Mississippi Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce Cindy Hyde-Smith.

August 14, 2012 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Nuts

CLARKSDALE – Mississippi State University will hold the first North Mississippi Peanut Field Day on Aug. 29 in Coahoma County.

Registration for the half-day event begins at 9 a.m. Activities will include updates by MSU research and Extension specialists, as well as harvest demonstrations. The event will be held at Mark and John Agostinelli’s farm on Monty Martin Road off New Africa Road in Clarksdale. Snacks will be provided by the Mississippi Peanut Growers Association.

From left, Holmes County Extension Director Betsy Padgett, Holmes County District 2 Supervisor James Young, and Holmes County Supervisor District 2 staff member Linda Lowery inspect okra in the community garden in Durant. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
August 16, 2012 - Filed Under: Community, Vegetable Gardens

DURANT – Holmes County, where 4-H was born as a “corn club” more than 100 years ago, is getting back to its roots by inspiring a new generation to garden.

A community garden project blossomed with the help of District 2 county supervisor James Young, the Mississippi State University Extension Service and local volunteers.

Employees at Pride of the Pond in Tunica work precisely and quickly to trim catfish fillets that will later be frozen and shipped. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Scott Corey)
August 16, 2012 - Filed Under: Catfish

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- In an industry with small profit margins, a perishable product and fierce, largely unregulated competition, one Mississippi company has confidently filled its market for more than 30 years.

Pride of the Pond is the catfish processing operation of Battle Farms of Tunica. Owned by Bill Battle, the farm has about 10,000 acres of row crops and 2,700 acres of ponds in Panola, Tunica and Quitman counties. The state-of-the-art catfish processing plant is located just a few miles outside Tunica and employs 121 people.

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