You are here

News From 2011

Dr. Mark Woodrey and Dr. George Hopper
May 5, 2011 - Filed Under: Community

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Three Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station faculty members were recently recognized for their significant contributions to their fields.

Peter Ryan, Mark Woodrey and Ramon Arancibia were honored at the MAFES and Mississippi State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences annual spring meeting.

The April 27 tornadoes caused extensive damage to forestland in several Mississippi counties, resulting in an estimated $8.4 million in timber losses (Photo by Scott Corey)
May 5, 2011 - Filed Under: Forest Economics, Timber Harvest

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Tornadoes that swept through Mississippi and much of the southeast April 27 caused an estimated $8.4 million of timber losses.

The Mississippi Forestry Commission compiled the estimate April 30 based on aerial surveys conducted after the storms. Russell Bozeman, director of forest protection and forest information with the commission, said the total affected area was about 26,240 acres. Of this, 15,564 were forested acres.

May 5, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Community, Disaster Response

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Long before and long after tornadoes are on the ground, Mississippi State University Extension Service personnel are in position to lend a helping hand in every community impacted by a disaster.

Chickasaw County Extension director Scott Cagle is helping communities cope in the aftermath of two tornadoes: one that passed through around 3 a.m. on April 27 and the second, stronger tornado that followed a different path about 12 hours later.

May 5, 2011 - Filed Under: Disaster Response-Youth, Family, Children and Parenting

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The Mississippi River is predicted to reach historic flood levels this spring, and families can help their children by planning together for potential evacuations.

Mississippi State University Extension Service experts advise parents to take steps to prepare their children physically and emotionally so they can better deal with the challenges of being displaced from home.

Be creative when making plant tags for the garden. These plastic knives are just right for plant identification.
May 3, 2011 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens

Many gardeners believe they can remember every plant in the garden, and I’ll admit I’ve told myself I could do just that. But even gardeners with great memories will one day say, “Now, what is that plant?”

Plant tags, or garden markers, can be both useful and stylish. They can denote different gardeners or different parts of the garden. They can be plain or fancy. Use your imagination and creativity when creating yours.

Timber took a beating from several tornadoes that went across the state April 27. This timber along Highway 403 in Mathiston was in an area among the hardest hit that day. (Photo by Kat Lawrence)
April 29, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Crops, Grains, Disaster Response

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The tornadoes of April 27 took a toll on Mississippi’s agriculture, with timber, the state’s No. 2 most valuable agricultural commodity, taking the biggest hit.

Massive storms have swept the state all month, bringing hail, torrential rains and tornadoes. Wednesday was the worst day, with the majority of the damage scattered across the northern part of the state.

April 29, 2011 - Filed Under: Community, Economic Development

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The Mississippi State University Extension Service recently formalized a partnership with the Mississippi State University Small Business Development Center to enhance economic development opportunities for entrepreneurs across the state.

Ongoing rains are flooding fields, delaying planting and postponing needed management such as weed control. This south Monroe County corn field was flooded by late April storms. (Photo by Scott Corey)
April 29, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Crops, Cotton, Grains

MISSISSIPPI STATE – April’s heavy rains have been devastating Mississippi’s agriculture, as they delay planting, postpone management and flood fields.

Heavy rains that accompanied the late-April storms added to already soggy soils and are pushing some planting dates dangerously late.

The emerald ash borer is metallic green in color and about 1/2 inch long. The beetle's larva tunnels under the bark and disrupts the ash tree's absorption of food and water, eventually starving and killing it. (Photo by USDA ARS/Stephen Ausmus)
April 28, 2011 - Filed Under: Environment, Insects, Insects-Pests

By Karen Templeton
MSU Ag Communications

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Federal and state government experts have teamed up with Mississippi State University to search for a small beetle that could mean big trouble for Mississippi.

The 4-H Learning Center and Pete Frierson Museum is located at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum on Lakeland Drive in Jackson.  (Photo by Kat Lawrence)
April 28, 2011 - Filed Under: 4-H, Family

MISSISSIPPI STATE – A museum showcasing the contributions of Mississippians who have participated in America’s largest youth organization is getting a high-tech renovation.

The Mississippi 4-H Learning Center and Pete Frierson Museum is undergoing a transformation of its exhibits, funded by a $120,000 grant from the Mississippi Land, Water and Timber Resources Board. As part of the larger Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum, the 4-H learning center focuses on the connection between youth and agriculture.

Several tornadoes that ravaged the region on April 26 and April 27 knocked down trees in affected areas. Horticulturists with the Mississippi State University Extension Service advise people to use caution in removing trees and debris. (Photo by Scott Corey)
April 28, 2011 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden

By Lelia Scott Kelly
Consumer Horticulture Specialist, North Mississippi Research & Extension Center

MISSISSIPPI STATE – As Mississippians begin the process of rebuilding and cleaning up their tornado-ravaged landscapes, they should consider ways to make the process safer and easier.    

Safety is the first consideration, so removing of any damaged trees or large limbs that pose a hazard to homes or people should come first.  Hire a professional to do this if you cannot safely do the job. 

April 28, 2011 - Filed Under: Soils, Water, Water Quality

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The cumulative effect of many individual bad choices can be as harmful to the water quality in an area as if a major disaster occurred.

Amy Schmidt, water quality specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said overfertilizing lawns and pouring chemicals into storm drains harm water quality. But dumping unneeded medicines and personal care products into the sewer system can be just as bad.

Hay production is a key component of a successful livestock producer's management plan. Forage management practices, including weed control and fertilizer use, will be part of the spring grazing school offered by MSU Extension Service. (Photo by Scott Corey)
April 28, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Forages

Editors Note: The class scheduled for June 2 at the Prairie Research Unit was canceled on May 24 and will not be rescheduled.

MISSISSIPPI STATE – The Mississippi State University Extension Service will offer its annual spring grazing school to help livestock producers with their forage management practices.

Container gardening isn't just for flowers . Many vegetables can be grown in containers, such as these tomatoes in 3-gallon nursery containers.
April 26, 2011 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Vegetable Gardens

Containers aren’t just for flowers; they can be used to grow fresh vegetables for aspiring gardeners who don’t have a traditional garden.

Container gardening isn’t just for flowers (top). Many vegetables can be grown in containers, such as these tomatoes in 3-gallon nursery containers.

A container is a great way to grow fresh produce in a small space. These mini bok choy (bottom) are thriving in window boxes. (Photos by Gary Bachman)

April 21, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, Crops, Soybeans

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi soybean farmers have started planting in spite of unpredictable spring weather that has brought strong wind and heavy rains to some areas while leaving other regions dry.

About 10 percent to 20 percent of the soybean crop is planted.

One of the three broods of 13-year cicadas will emerge in the thousands this spring in Mississippi. With their black bodies and orange eyes, these periodical cicadas are different from the large, green, annual cicadas that emerge each summer. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Blake Layton)
April 21, 2011 - Filed Under: Insects

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Northeast Mississippi will be noisier than usual later this spring when periodical cicadas make their once-every-13-year appearance.

Blake Layton, entomologist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said the periodical cicadas are different from the large, green, annual cicadas that emerge and sound off each summer, usually from mid-June through fall.

“Periodical cicadas are black and orange with red eyes, and they hatch in the thousands,” Layton said. “The singing of the males is loud and long.”

Ray Welch, owner of Winona Stockyards, serves as the auctioneer for the Cattlemen's Exchange and Homeplace Producer Sale held in April. Buyers see video segments and read descriptions of cattle lots as they bid on the animals. More than 2,000 cattle were sold in less than an hour with total receipts approaching $1.9 million. (Photo by Linda Breazeale)
April 21, 2011 - Filed Under: Agriculture, Livestock, Beef

MISSISSIPPI STATE -- Cattle producers and buyers are finding a win-win method of marketing cattle in the Cattlemen’s Exchange and Homeplace Producer Sales.

Mississippi State University’s Extension Service is partnering with several organizations and sale barns to offer auctions in Winona and Hattiesburg for cattle that may never pass through either of those cities. Cattle remain on their home farms while buyers cast bids based on written descriptions of the cattle and video technology.

April 21, 2011 - Filed Under: Food

MISSISSIPPI STATE – Mississippi State University will teach kids there can never be too many cooks in the kitchen at the fifth annual Fun with Food camp.

MSU’s Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion is offering the Fun with Food camp for students entering third through sixth grade.

Virginia sweetspire produces long-lasting blooms that are up to 6 inches long and resemble fireworks. Here Virginia sweetspire combines nicely with a pink Knockout rose. (Photo by Gary Bachman)
April 19, 2011 - Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens

It takes a special plant to be named a Mississippi Medallion winner, and the Mississippi native Virginia sweetspire was one of the plants that earned that honor this year.

The Mississippi Nursery and Landscape Association names Medallion winners based on their superior performance in gardens and landscapes across the state. In response to renewed interest in native plants, the association has begun choosing a Mississippi native each year for one of its awards.

Pages

Archive