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Frequently Asked Questions

Is it possible for vegetables, especially squash, watermelons, pumpkins, etc., to cross in the garden to create a strange fruit?

This question comes up every year. Here's the bottom line on vegetable crossing.

Most vegetables do not cross since they would have to be in the same species to cross. But even if they DO cross (those that are in the same species) it will have no effect on the current year's fruit.
Only the seeds will be affected and this will not show up unless you save your own seeds and plant them the next year. In that case, there may be all kinds off types produced.

FYI, watermelons and squash are in different species so it is impossible for them to cross at all.

The crosses that can occur are some squashes with some pumpkins (if they are in the same species, namely Cucurbita pepo) - there are several other species of squash and pumpkins.

Also, various types of melons (NOT watermelons) can cross. These include cantaloupes, honeydews, canaries, crenshaw, santa claus melons, and persian melons since they are in the same species, Cucumis melo.


Dr. Rick Snyder, Extension Vegetable Specialist

 

 

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Publications

Publication Number: P2364
Publication Number: P3076
Publication Number: M2064

News

A basket holds an assortment of red, yellow and green peppers.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Vegetable Gardens May 3, 2021

The month of May signals that it’s time for me to start planting culinary peppers in my home garden.

Freshly mowed lawn.
Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Plant Diseases, Trees, Vegetable Gardens April 29, 2021

As warmer weather creeps in, many people find themselves spending more time outdoors and working in their yards. If you’re like me, you’ve probably made a trip or two to your local garden center looking for plants and other garden necessities. After reading over May’s garden checklist, it looks like you may need to make a few more trips. Here are some tasks to check off this month. 

Plants grow from wooden boxes that have an overhead, curved pipe system.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Vegetable Gardens April 28, 2021

Mississippi’s long growing season means potential gardeners have until at least July to start growing vegetables, but the state’s ideal gardening climate also means weeds and pests are constant threats. Gardeners often grow flowers in containers to add pops of color and spots of greenery in otherwise unworkable areas, and they can be equally successful using containers to grow vegetables.

A single, green cucumber hangs on a vine.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Vegetable Gardens April 5, 2021

If you read this Southern Gardening column frequently, you realize that I grow much more than pretty flowers in my home garden. Besides ornamental plants, I love to grow vegetables that my wife and I can enjoy for dinner.

A field of orange and yellow marigolds.
Filed Under: Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Plant Diseases, Trees, Vegetable Gardens March 29, 2021

If you’re anything like me, I find any excuse to get outside. The warmer temperatures and colorful blooms are refreshing, especially after the cold winter we had! Working on outdoor chores is a great excuse to get some fresh air. Here are a few tasks you need to cross off your checklist during April:

Success Stories

A gray-haired man wearing overalls and glasses sits beside a raised salad table, and a black-haired woman stands behind him, wearing a blue T-shirt, with her hand on his shoulder.
Youth Livestock, Lawn and Garden, Cut Flowers and Houseplants, Flower Gardens, Herb Gardens, Vegetable Gardens
Volume 4 Number 2

As Jimmy Henry’s health began to decline, his wife, Shirley, wanted him to remain comfortable, safe, and happy. When the time came for Jimmy to enter a nursing home, Shirley was determined to stay right by his side, so she went with him.

Red potatoes in a biodegradable basket are flanked on either side by green snap beans.
Agri-tourism, Culinary Tourism, Local Food System Economies, Farmers Markets, Economic Development, Rural Development, Food, Health, Nutrition, Rural Health, Vegetable Gardens
Volume 4 Number 2

From the youngest to the oldest generations, thousands of people are visiting, shopping, and enjoying themselves at the Hernando Farmers’ Market, held Saturdays on the historic DeSoto County Courthouse lawn.

The market has more than just fresh produce. It connects the community by uniting the shoppers, producers, and artisans who come.

A white sign with dark green lettering reads, “Monarch Waystation: This site provides milkweeds, nectar sources, and shelter needed to sustain monarch butterflies as they migrate through North America. Certified and registered by Monarch Watch as an official Monarch Waystation. Create, Conserve, & Protect Monarch Habitats.”
Wildlife Youth Education, About Extension, Master Gardener, Insects, Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Herb Gardens, Places for Wildlife, The Story of Plants and People, Vegetable Gardens, Urban and Community Forestry, Urban and Backyard Wildlife, Wildlife Economics and Enterprises
Volume 4 Number 2

See what's new in Extension: a new monarch garden, a storytelling series will begin, the Garden Expo highlights Extension education, and Keep America Beautiful recognizes MSU Extension.

Six children, all dressed in blue T-shirts and slacks, bend over a raised bed garden with growing cabbages and tomatoes.
Community, Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Herb Gardens, Landscape Design and Management, Vegetable Gardens, Youth Gardening
Volume 4 Number 2

After a tragic car accident in 2017 led to the deaths of two Central Elementary School students, school leaders raised money to support their funerals. Their efforts inspired many South Mississippi residents in Lucedale and across George County.

A gray-haired man with white goatee wears a brown blazer over a red polo with blue jeans and brown shoes. He stands in a dirt path flanked on both sides by parsley, about waist-high.
Irrigation, Lawn and Garden, Flower Gardens, Herb Gardens, Vegetable Gardens, Environment
Volume 4 Number 2

John Monroe has been familiar with the Mississippi State University Extension Service since he was a child.

“I grew up on a small farm in George County,” says Monroe. “My dad took gardening seriously, and we weren’t blessed with the best soil. So my dad worked very closely with the county agent. He’d come out to our place on a regular basis.”

Watch

Replanting a Salad Table
Southern Gardening

Replanting a Salad Table

Sunday, July 19, 2020 - 5:00am
Growing Pickles
Southern Gardening

Growing Pickles

Sunday, July 12, 2020 - 5:00am
Bachman's Heritage Cottage
Southern Gardening

Bachman's Heritage Cottage

Monday, November 25, 2019 - 7:00am
Hot Ornamental Peppers
Southern Gardening

Hot Ornamental Peppers

Sunday, September 8, 2019 - 7:30am
Planting a Salad Table
Southern Gardening

Planting a Salad Table

Sunday, August 4, 2019 - 4:45pm

Listen

Tuesday, October 1, 2019 - 7:00am
Friday, September 20, 2019 - 7:00am
Monday, December 17, 2018 - 7:00am
Friday, October 26, 2018 - 2:00am

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Portrait of Dr. Rick Snyder
Extension/Research Professor
Greenhouse Tomatoes and other vegetables, Field Vegetables, Mushrooms