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How does the study of Forest Genetics improve tree species?

Forest genetics is the study of hereditary variation in trees. Like all living organisms genes control the traits that trees exhibit. Pines, oaks, maples, etc. have unique compliments of genes that define the species. The individual tree that grows in the forest is a product of its genes and the environment in which it lives. Just as genetics can be used to improve the milk production of dairy cattle, the hunting ability of dogs, or the grain production of a corn variety, genetics can be used to improve the characteristics of trees.

Tree improvement is the application of forest genetics to field practice. Tree improvement work is accomplished by testing wild tree selections and determining which will grow best when planted on certain sites or in specific geographic locations.

Tree improvement is a long-term endeavor because trees are long-lived organisms, and breeding programs rely on seed production that often comes in later stages of tree life. Various techniques have been developed, however, to cause some tree species to produce seed earlier. These include grafting and cultural practices like root pruning.

Many landowners in the southern U.S. have heard and use the expression "Super Pine" for pine seedlings that have been produced by a tree improvement program. These trees are seedlings grown from seed produced by parent trees that have been selected for superior form, growth rate, and other characteristics. These "superior seedlings" may be from forest industry or state agency tree programs. "Improved seedlings" have become much more available in the last decade, and these seedlings are being widely planted because on average, they grow 10% faster (or more) than "woods run" (average wild stock) seedlings.

Tree improvement programs and forest genetics research have been conducted throughout the world since about the 1950s. Generally, tree improvement programs for the conifer species were begun earlier because of their economic value and the fact they are more frequently planted. Scots pine, Norway spruce, Loblolly pine, European Larch, Eastern White pine, White spruce, Red spruce, and Douglas-fir are good examples. Tree improvement projects with broadleaf tree species have also been underway for at least 20 years. Some of the "hardwood" tree species in tree improvement programs around the world include black walnut, sugar maple, birches (black, yellow, and paper), European black alder, white ash, poplars, willows, northern red oak, and eucalyptus.

The most widely available improved tree seedlings to Mississippi landowners are "improved" pine, principally Loblolly pine. These trees can be purchased from the Mississippi Forestry Commission or forest industry nurseries such as Weyerhaeuser or International Paper Co. Landowners purchasing seedlings should be sure to match the seed source of the seedlings with the planting locality.

For more information on forest genetics and tree improvement check the following references:

  • An Introduction to Forest Genetics by Jonathan W. Wright. 1976. Academic Press, Inc., New York 463 p.
  • Geographic Variation in Forest Trees by E. Kristian Morgenstern. 1996. UBC Press Vancouver, B.C. 209 p.
  • A Guide to Southern Pine Seed Sources by Clark W. Lantz and John Kraus. 1987. Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, Asheville, N.C. Gen. Tech Rep. SE-43. 34 pp.

The U.S. Forest Service Seedling Nursery and Tree Improvement web site is a good source of current information and links on forest tree improvement and seedling production.

A Handy List of Forest Tree Nurseries

Sources of Seedlings Contact
Mississippi Forestry Commission Local County Forester
ArborGen Inc.--Mississippi SuperTree Sales 205-273-4367
Delta View Nursery 1-800-748-9018
International Forest Seed Company 1-800-633-4506
Mossy Oak Nativ Nursery 662-494-4326
Shirley's Tree Farm LLC 662-327-1500 or Email
Weyerhaeuser Company 1-800-635-0162 or Email
Advantage Forestry Container Pines, LLC 334-341-2059 or Email
Meek's Farms and Nursery, Inc. 1-877-809-1737 or Email
Rayonier Seedlings 251-986-5210 or Email
Sanctuary Timber & Wildlife 334-782-2360
Warren County Nursery 931-668-2245 or Email
The Wildlife Group 334-724-9300 or Email
Alabama Forestry Commission Website
Arkansas Forestry Commission 501-907-2485 or 2486
Tennessee Division of Forestry 877-868-7337 or Email
Containerized Longleaf Pine Contact
International Forest Seed Company 1-800-633-4506
Advantage Forestry Container Pines, LLC 334-341-2059 or Email
Meek's Farms and Nursery, Inc. 1-877-809-1737 or Email
Rayonier Seedlings 251-986-5210 or Email
Hardwood Seedlings Contact
Mississippi Forestry Commission Local County Forester
ArborGen Inc.--Mississippi SuperTree Sales 205-273-4367
Delta View Nursery 1-800-748-9018
Mossy Oak Nativ Nursery 662-494-4326
Shirley's Tree Farm LLC 662-327-1500 or Email
Advantage Forestry Container Pines, LLC 334-341-2059 or Email
Meek's Farms and Nursery, Inc. 1-877-809-1737 or Email
Sanctuary Timber & Wildlife 334-782-2360
Warren County Nursery 931-668-2245 or Email
The Wildlife Group 334-724-9300 or Email
Arkansas Forestry Commission 501-907-2485 or 2486
Tennessee Division of Forestry 877-868-7337 or Email
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Filed Under: Natural Resources, Christmas Trees, Urban and Backyard Wildlife December 18, 2020

If you celebrate with a real tree, you’ll have to decide how to dispose of it once the holiday is over. You have some good options for recycling the tree instead of sending it to the landfill.

Christmas tree in the foreground in a field with other trees behind it.
Filed Under: Trees, Christmas Trees November 19, 2020

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Filed Under: Agriculture, Trees, Christmas Trees November 19, 2020

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Several years ago, Larry Castle, formerly of Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks (MDWFP), and Steve Demarais of the Mississippi State University Deer Lab got together to discuss what could be done to address deer hunter questions and concerns regarding where bucks were going during hunting season. For years, Larry and his team at MDWFP would get questions from hunters who were frustrated with not seeing the deer they think they should be seeing. 

Closeup of ornaments and lights on a Christmas tree
Filed Under: Christmas Trees November 11, 2020

Choosing, cutting, and bringing home a real Christmas tree is a fun, family tradition that makes memories to last a lifetime. If you plan to have a real tree this year, be sure to observe some safety rules.

Pine trees surround a small clearing in a Mississippi forest.
Filed Under: Forestry, Forestry Impacts, Marketing, Timber Prices, Forest Management, Timber Harvest December 18, 2019

Mississippi’s timber industry remained its second highest producing agricultural commodity again in 2019.

Coming in with an estimated production value of $1.15 billion, timber followed the state’s poultry industry, which generated an estimated value of $2.78 billion in 2019. Timber’s value of production is estimated by monthly severance taxes collected by the Mississippi Department of Revenue.

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