You are here

Forest Herbicide Effectiveness on Mississippi Tree and Shrub Species

Filed Under:
Publication Number: P3415
View as PDF: P3415.pdf

Regarding forest herbicide efficacy, one of the most common concerns is how well an herbicide controls a specific tree or shrub species. Obviously, if you purchase herbicide and spend the time required to apply it, you want effective control of the targeted stems. While individual herbicide labels contain some species-specific information, the list of woody species and their tolerance to that particular herbicide is typically limited.

The table on the next page provides a list of commonly used forest herbicides and their associated effectiveness in controlling certain species. Susceptibility level is shown for each herbicide and each woody species specifically. These levels of susceptibility were established using the references below, herbicide labels, and personal field research experience. These ratings are not absolute, as herbicide efficacy depends on multiple factors. However, these assessments provide expected effectiveness of listed herbicides under normal application conditions and proper application procedures.

Control is categorized as susceptible (S), intermediate (I), or tolerant (T). A susceptible ranking means that at least 80 percent control of species in that particular genus is expected. A ranking of intermediate means that 40–80 percent control can be expected. If you use an intermediate-ranked herbicide, an additional herbicide application will likely be needed. A ranking of tolerant means that herbicide will not provide control and should not be considered. If there is no ranking for a particular herbicide under a species grouping, there is not enough information available to offer an assessment.

Table 1. Effectiveness of forest herbicides by woody species group.

Part 1

Herbicide

Maple

Alder

Serviceberry

Birch

Hornbeam

Hickory/Pecan

Hackberry/Sugarberry

Redbud

Dogwood

Hawthorn

Persimmon

Aminopyralid

S

S

S

S

S

Clethodim

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

Clopyralid

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

S

T

T

T

Dicamba

I

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

T

Fosamine

T

S

S

T

T

S

Glyphosate

I

S

I

S

I

I

I

T

I

S

I

Hexazinone

I

S

I

I

S

T

Imazapyr

S

S

S

S

I

S

I

T

S

S

S

Metsulfuron

S

S

S

Oxyflourfen

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

Picloram

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

I

S

S

Picloram + 2,4-D

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

Sulfometuron

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

Triclopyr (amine)

S

S

S

S

I

S

S

S

S

I

Triclopyr (ester)

I

S

S

S

I

S

S

S

I

I

2, 4-D

I

I

I

T

I

I

S

I

I

Part 2

Herbicide

Beech

Ash

Honeylocust

Walnut

Juniper

Sweetgum

Poplar

Osage orange

Mulberry

Blackgum

Hophornbeam

Aminopyralid

S

S

Clethodim

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

Clopyralid

T

T

S

T

T

T

T

T

Dicamba

S

T

Fosamine

S

S

T

Glyphosate

S

I

I

I

S

S

T

I

I

I

Hexazinone

I

S

T

T

Imazapyr

S

S

T

S

S

S

T

S

S

I

Metsulfuron

S

S

I

S

Oxyflourfen

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

Picloram

S

I

S

S

S

I

S

S

S

S

S

Picloram + 2,4-D

S

S

S

S

S

I

S

S

S

S

S

Sulfometuron

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

Triclopyr (amine)

S

S

I

S

T

S

S

S

S

S

S

Triclopyr (ester)

S

I

I

S

I

S

S

S

S

S

S

2, 4-D

I

T

S

I

I

I

S

T

Part 3

Herbicide

Sourwood

Pine

Sycamore

Cottonwood

Prunus species

Oak

Sumac

Black locust

Willow

Sassafras

Chinese tallow

Elm

Aminopyralid

I

S

S

S

S

S

Clethodim

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

Clopyralid

T

T

T

T

T

T

S

T

T

Dicamba

I

S

S

I

I

S

S

S

Fosamine

T

S

S

S

I

S

S

S

T

T

S

I

Glyphosate

I

S

S

S

I

S

I

I

I

I

I

I

Hexazinone

T

T

S

I

S

I

S

T

S

Imazapyr

S

T*

S

S

S

S

S

T

S

S

S

T

Metsulfuron

T**

S

S

S

S

S

S

Oxyflourfen

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

Picloram

I

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

I

Picloram + 2,4-D

S

I

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

Sulfometuron

T

T

T

S

T

T

I

T

T

T

T

T

Triclopyr (amine)

I

I

S

S

I

I

I

S

S

S

S

I

Triclopyr (ester)

I

I

S

S

I

I

I

S

S

S

S

S

2, 4-D

I

S

I

S

I

I

I

I

I

S = susceptible, I = intermediate, T = tolerant, • = information too limited for susceptibility assessment

*Susceptible to Chopper® Gen2

**Will kill longleaf pine

References

Cantrell, R. L. A Guide to Silvicultural Herbicide Use in the Southern United States. Auburn University, Auburn University School of Forestry. November 1985.

Cunningham, K., Taylor, E., Barber, B., Holley, G., and Blazier, M. 2019. Forestry Herbicide Prescriptions: Western Gulf Region. University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service publication MP553.

Heiligmann, R. B., and Krause, D. 2006. Relative Effectiveness of Herbicides Commonly Used to Control Woody Vegetation in Forest Stands. The Ohio State University Extension factsheet F-51-06.

Miller, J. H., and Mitchell, R. J. 1990. A Manual on Ground Applications of Forestry Herbicides. USDA Forest Service. Management bulletin R8-MB21.


Publication 3415 (POD-01-20)

By A. Brady Self, PhD, Associate Extension Professor, Forestry.

Copyright 2020 by Mississippi State University. All rights reserved. This publication may be copied and distributed without alteration for nonprofit educational purposes provided that credit is given to the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

Produced by Agricultural Communications.

Mississippi State University is an equal opportunity institution. Discrimination in university employment, programs, or activities based on race, color, ethnicity, sex, pregnancy, religion, national origin, disability, age, sexual orientation, genetic information, status as a U.S. veteran, or any other status protected by applicable law is prohibited. Questions about equal opportunity programs or compliance should be directed to the Office of Compliance and Integrity, 56 Morgan Avenue, P.O. 6044, Mississippi State, MS 39762, (662) 325-5839.

Extension Service of Mississippi State University, cooperating with U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published in furtherance of Acts of Congress, May 8 and June 30, 1914. GARY B. JACKSON, Director

The Mississippi State University Extension Service is working to ensure all web content is accessible to all users. If you need assistance accessing any of our content, please email the webteam or call 662-325-2262.

Select Your County Office

Authors

Portrait of Dr. Brady Self
Associate Extension Professor
Hardwood Silviculture Forest Herbicides