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Smart Growth for Small Towns

Smart Growth for Small Towns relates the principles of Smart Growth to towns and rural communities, providing examples, discussion, explanation, and advice on community design and development.

The educational information provided on this site is intended to contribute to an understanding of the intent and purpose of the Smart Growth principles. However, planning for the future of our small towns requires input from a variety of fields and includes issues of design, policymaking, and governance. This site is focused primarily upon design issues associated with small towns and is intended to serve as a resource for government officials, teachers, designers, and the general public.

The explanation of each Smart Growth principle includes the following:

A.) Discussion of the purpose of the principles and why it is important.

B.) Strategies that suggest actions communities can take to help achieve the goals of the principle.

Ten Principles of Smart Growth:

  1. Mix land uses
  2. Take advantage of compact building design
  3. Create a range of housing opportunities and choices
  4. Create walkable neighborhoods
  5. Foster distinctive, attractive communities with a strong sense of place
  6. Preserve open space, farmland, natural beauty, and critical environmental areas
  7. Strengthen and direct development towards existing communities
  8. Provide a variety of transportation choices
  9. Make development decisions predictable, fair, and cost effective
  10. Encourage community and stakeholder collaboration in development decisions

Smart Growth for Small Towns is a cooperative project of Extension faculty of the Department of Landscape Architecture and the Stennis Institute of Government and Community Development. For more information contact Michael Seymour, Associate Extension Professor at or Jeremy Murdock, Research Associate at

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Filed Under: Master Gardener March 19, 2018

 Gardeners can buy native and naturalized heirloom plants during the annual Metro Master Gardeners plant sale April 28.

Filed Under: Fruit, Technology March 7, 2018

POPLARVILLE, Miss. -- Designing an app that helps fruit growers know how many chill hours their crops have accumulated earned one Mississippi State University Extension Service specialist a regional award.

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Filed Under: Master Gardener, Flower Gardens, Vegetable Gardens February 20, 2018

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- The Everything Garden Expo, presented by the Oktibbeha County Master Gardeners, will return to the Mississippi Horse Park on March 24 and 25.

Filed Under: Community, Technology February 2, 2018

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- A Mississippi State University Extension Service instructor has earned an Impact Collaborative Facilitator certificate from the eXtension Foundation.

Filed Under: Local Flavor, City and County Government January 29, 2018

COLUMBUS, Miss. -- The Mississippi State University Extension Service is offering a financial workshop to entrepreneurs and community leaders working with food or food-related initiatives.

Success Stories

Members of the Covington County Tax Accessors office
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When longtime deputy clerk Dannie J. Abercrombie threatened to quit after 33 years in the Covington County Tax Assessor/Collector’s office, she was frustrated that Mississippi was changing the vehicle registration and titling system in place since 1980.

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Since joining Mississippi State University as a development officer nearly 2 years ago, alumnus Will Staggers has been hard at work cultivating private support for the MSU Extension Service.

Woman in glasses smiles in front of brick building
City and County Government Extension Matters: Volume 3 Number 4

Eunice Blake has spent more than 35 years serving Amite County citizens in the tax assessor and collector’s office.

In those years, she’s looked to the Mississippi State University Extension Service for support.

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STEM – Science Technology Engineering and Math, Dairy, Pesticide Applicator Certification, City and County Government, Mississippi Homemaker Volunteers, Soil Testing, Natural Resources Extension Matters: Volume 3 Number 3

4-H Debuts New Curriculum · Extension Develops Workforce · La-Z-Boy Donates Fabric · Stars Focus On Sustainability · Extension Directs Herbicide Training · Youth Discover Dairy Science · Soil Lab Welcomes New Manager

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Community, Family Dynamics, Flower Gardens, Youth Gardening Extension Matters: Volume 3 Number 3

Before she became the Hancock County Youth Court judge, Elise Deano was a school teacher. She jokes that she became a lawyer because she taught school, but Deano wants to make sure young people get an opportunity to turn their lives around.


Tech in the Kitchen June 21, 2015
The Food Factor

Tech in the Kitchen

Saturday, June 20, 2015 - 7:00pm


Monday, March 19, 2018 - 2:00am
Monday, February 5, 2018 - 7:00am
Monday, January 15, 2018 - 7:00am
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 2:30am
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - 1:00am

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