You are here

2019 Corn Hybrid Demonstration Program Results

Filed Under:
Publication Number: P3441
View as PDF: P3441.pdf

Coordinator: Dr. Erick Larson Extension Associate: Nolan Stapleton

MSU Extension Supervisors: Preston Aust, Andy Braswell, Alex Deason, Dan Haire, Ty Jones, Kyle Lewis, Reid Nevins, Dr. Dennis Reginelli, Tracy Robertson, Dr. Mark Shankle, and Charlie Stokes

Grower Cooperators: Spencer Alderman, Andrew’s Farm, Brown Farms, Dantzler Pilkinton and Phillips Farm, Delta Conservation Demonstration Center, Dunn Farms, Harlow Farms, Michael Hawks, McClain Farms, Murphy Farms, Shellmound Farms, Steve Skelton, and Van Buren Farms

Program Objectives: The Corn Hybrid Demonstration Program is intended to provide corn growers, crop consultants, and other agricultural professionals a firsthand opportunity to observe performance of elite hybrids and generate information to better assess hybrid performance and adaptability in Mississippi. This program provides a unique opportunity to observe and evaluate plant characteristics and environmental responses of our best corn hybrids in local, on-farm demonstration plots representing Mississippi’s production systems.

Program Methodology: Hybrids selected for this program must be validated by producing superior grain yield in the Mississippi Corn for Grain Hybrid Trials or be a relevant market standard. Hybrids are selected annually and grouped into two distinct sets based upon performance in dryland or irrigated culture, since both these cropping systems are prevalent in Mississippi and significantly affect hybrid adaptability. Seed companies are granted the discretion to enter the hybrid that has demonstrated superior performance in the Mississippi Corn for Grain Hybrid Trials, or a newly released hybrid that they feel is more promising or better adapted. This establishes an elite group of corn hybrids for evaluation in the program. Each standardized set of hybrids is grown at numerous field locations representing Mississippi cropping systems. Mississippi State University Extension regional agronomic crop specialists and county agricultural agents coordinate locations with grower cooperators and supervise plots during the season.

Grain Yield Data: Hybrids evaluated in this program are generally planted in “strip trials.” Yield data generated from a single location are not as reliable as when treatments are replicated numerous times. Treatment replication reduces the effect of numerous factors that can impart variability that may affect performance and confound results. Thus, average yields are calculated from data collected at multiple locations and presented in this publication to better assess yield performance related to hybrid genetics. Analyses of yield data were performed with SAS using GLM procedures, and means are separated at the 0.05 level. This yield data derived from numerous, diverse environments is intended to supplement data generated in university hybrid trials.

Technology Traits: All hybrid entries are glyphosate tolerant. Inclusion of other traits is optional and is primarily based on product availability and the discretion of the respective seed companies. Corn borer protection normally enhances yield at locations where corn borers are present. All seeds are commercially treated with an insecticide seed treatment, which is at the discretion of each respective seed company. Seed treatments are utilized to minimize damage from insect pests during seedling establishment.

Relative Maturity: Maturity is measured and reported as the number of days to tassel, as well as grain moisture at harvest. Grain moisture is represented for locations where grain was still actively drying at harvest.

Plant Height: Full plant height is measured after tassel emergence. Plant height is one of several factors that may affect light interception, which is critical to photosynthesis and grain yield. Short plant height may reduce potential light interception, particularly in wide rows. Tall plants are generally more likely to lodge and will likely have higher water demand during the growing season.

Ear Height: Ear height is measured and represented as a mean height above the soil surface. High ear placement may promote more efficient energy use in the plant, as leaves in the upper canopy intercept more light and produce more photosynthetic energy for the developing ear. However, high ear placement may make plants more top-heavy and more prone to lodge when exposed to strong wind.

Stalk Strength: An evaluation of a hybrid’s ability to resist stalk lodging, which is when the lower stalk bends, collapses, or breaks above ground level. Stalk lodging often increases when harvest is delayed by rainy weather, which promotes stalk deterioration. Stalk lodging is usually more prevalent than root lodging but may be less troublesome because timely harvest can mediate issues and combines can still gather stalks.

Stalk Integrity: A characterization of the plant’s ability to maintain physical integrity after physiological maturity. Poor stalk integrity may appear as shriveled, shredded, or dislodged leaves and brittle or broken stalks, particularly above the ear. Late-season stress and adverse weather often promote plant deterioration during the time between physiological maturity and harvest.

Greensnap: This is a relative rating to resist greensnap, which is an issue where corn stalks are completely broken off by high winds. This usually occurs during mid- to late vegetative growth stages when the stalks are rapidly developing and may be brittle and vulnerable to break, if exposed to high wind. These damaged stalks normally break below where the ear should develop. Thus, damaged plants rarely produce a viable ear.

Wind Lodging Resistance: An evaluation of a hybrid’s ability to resist lodging induced by wind during vegetative growth stages. Wind lodging is very similar to root lodging, but this type of lodging occurs during mid-vegetative stages, prior to brace root development. Plants generally try to re-assume vertical orientation within a few days of lodging; however, stalks will likely suffer goose-necking near ground level, where they cannot fully straighten. This characteristic is distinctively different from greensnap, which may also occur during similar growth stages.

Disease Resistance: Disease resistance refers to a hybrid’s ability to resist infection from a specific pathogen. Curvularia leaf spot was rated during 2019 based upon increasing degree of disease presence.

Yield Components: Corn grain yield is determined by the total number of kernels produced and kernel weight. Kernel number is the number of kernel rows an ear produces and the number of kernels per row. Each of these traits is determined during different growing stages. Kernel row number is determined during late vegetative stages and is the first yield component determined by the plant. Kernel number is primarily determined during the first few weeks after pollination as young kernels develop until the milk stage. Kernel weight is the final yield component determined and is largely dependent upon favorable conditions from dough stage until physiological maturity.

Test Weight: Test weight is a measurement of grain bulk density and an indicator of general grain quality. It is a standard component used to assess official grain grade for commercial trade.

 

2019 Grain Yield Summary (bu/a): Dryland Locations

Brand

Hybrid

Canton

Artesia Low Pop

Artesia High Pop

Muldon

MSU

Pontotoc

Shellmound

NMREC

Average Yield*

AgriGold

A644-32

181

155

164

195

196

171

121

189

171 BCDE

AgriGold

A6659

178

168

173

208

181

203

117

207

179 AB

Armor

1447

193

155

175

192

197

192

120

174

175 BC

Croplan

5678

180

162

160

202

171

190

109

190

170 CDE

DEKALB

DKC67-44

187

170

191

213

197

202

126

195

185 A

DEKALB

DKC68-69

183

151

171

213

172

215

111

195

176 BC

DEKALB

DKC70-27

159

158

163

200

187

200

108

190

171 CDE

Dyna-Gro

D54VC14

174

164

163

209

190

193

122

191

176 BC

Dyna-Gro

D58VC65

185

147

165

196

172

190

118

191

171 CDE

Local Seed

LC1577

190

158

175

200

193

193

114

153

172 BCD

Pioneer

P1464

182

167

167

197

194

199

122

188

177 ABC

Terral

24BHR99

169

144

156

198

178

185

97

178

163 E

Terral

28BHR18

167

146

155

193

184

175

119

170

164 DE

 

Location Average

179

157

168

201

185

193

116

185

173

Soil Type

Falkner silt loam

Okolona silty clay

Okolona silty clay

Tensas silty clay loam

Sumter silty clay

Leeper silty clay loam

Vicksburg silt loam

Houston clay

Planting Date

5/2/19

5/2/19

5/2/19

5/1/19

4/24/19

4/24/19

5/2/19

4/23/19

*Grain yields were analyzed, and average yield values represented with any combination of the same letter are not significantly different (P < 0.05).

 

2019 Plant Characteristic Ratings: Dryland Entries

Brand

Hybrid

Days to Tassel

% Grain Moisture

Plant Ht (feet, 10ths)

Ear Ht (feet, 10ths)

Stalk Strength

Stalk Integrity

Greensnap Resistance

Curvularia Leaf Spot Resistance

Test Wt (lb/bu)

Yield Components

                     

Kernel Rows

Kernels per row

Seed Wt (g/250)

AgriGold

A644-32

59

16.2

8.4

3.9

Low

Medium

Medium

Medium

59.7

14.9

34.2

82.7

AgriGold

A6659

61

17.2

8.1

3.8

High

High

Low

Medium

59.5

14.3

36.7

88.7

Armor

1447

58

15.4

7.8

3.9

Medium

Med-Low

High

Low

59.8

14.8

37.0

82.1

Croplan

5678

59

16.0

7.9

3.9

High

Medium

Low

Medium

60.3

14.5

34.7

91.2

DEKALB

DKC67-44

60

15.9

8.4

3.9

High

High

Med-High

Med-High

60.3

15.0

35.3

82.1

DEKALB

DKC68-69

62

18.0

8.8

4.0

Med-High

High

Low

Medium

60.8

15.3

33.6

88.1

DEKALB

DKC70-27

62

18.1

8.4

3.7

High

High

Med-High

High

59.3

16.2

33.4

83.9

Dyna-Gro

D54VC14

58

16.0

7.9

3.8

Medium

Med-Low

High

Low

59.7

14.4

35.0

80.2

Dyna-Gro

D58VC65

60

16.1

7.9

3.9

High

Medium

Low

Medium

60.3

14.5

34.9

89.0

Local Seed

LC1577

59

15.5

8.0

3.8

Medium

Med-Low

High

Low

59.8

14.9

36.7

82.0

Pioneer

P1464

62

16.3

8.6

4.1

Med-Low

Low

High

High

59.4

15.3

37.1

76.6

Terral

24BHR99

61

16.0

8.5

4.0

High

Medium

High

Med-High

58.9

14.4

34.4

80.7

Terral

28BHR18

62

18.3

8.8

4.2

High

Med-High

High

High

59.3

16.6

37.1

75.4

 

Average

60

16.4

8.2

3.9

       

59.8

14.9

35.2

83.9

 

2019 Grain Yield Summary (bu/a): Irrigated Locations

Brand

Hybrid

Shaw

Itta Bena

Belzoni

Fairview

Metcalfe

Schlater

Boyle

Pontotoc

MSU

Average Yield*

AgriGold

A6544

255

262

178

217

201

182

185

169

168

202 BCD

AgriGold

A6659

251

261

181

206

210

175

183

178

202

205 ABC

Armor

1447

238

262

174

190

201

183

177

180

179

198 BCDE

Croplan

5678

250

255

178

212

190

195

186

171

183

202 BCD

DEKALB

DKC67-44

246

272

168

221

203

187

185

194

217

211 A

DEKALB

DKC68-69

253

268

167

210

222

200

190

187

204

211 A

DEKALB

DKC70-27

254

279

191

226

203

182

189

172

204

211 A

Dyna-Gro

D54VC14

243

260

174

214

212

190

172

177

173

202 BCD

Dyna-Gro

D58VC65

257

266

175

205

184

194

177

186

184

203 ABC

Local Seed

LC1577

251

254

173

191

193

177

157

175

177

194 DE

Mission

A1687

233

244

158

194

191

197

177

165

179

193 E

Pioneer

P1870

234

261

183

215

198

204

163

175

199

203 ABC

Terral

24BHR99

243

251

188

207

185

197

170

163

188

199 BCDE

Terral

26BHR30

242

269

168

207

211

207

171

184

197

206 AB

Terral

28BHR18

232

258

169

203

190

185

167

173

203

198 CDE

 

Location Average

245

261

175

208

200

190

177

177

190

203

Soil Type

Dundee silt loam

Dundee loam

Alligator clay

Brittain silt loam

Commerce silt loam

Dubbs loam

Forestdale silt loam

Adaton silt loam

Marietta fine sandy loam

Planting Date

3/24/19

4/22/19

3/28/19

3/21/19

4/3/19

3/29/19

4/1/19

4/24/19

4/3/19

*Grain yields were analyzed, and average yield values represented with any combination of the same letter are not significantly different (P < 0.05).

 

2019 Plant Characteristic Ratings: Irrigated Entries

Brand

Hybrid

Days to Tassel

% Grain Moisture

Plant Ht (feet, 10ths)

Ear Ht (feet, 10ths)

Stalk Strength

Stalk Integrity

Wind Lodging Resistance

Curvularia Leaf Spot Resistance

Test Wt (lb/bu)

Yield Components

                     

Kernel Rows

Kernels per row

Seed Wt (g/250)

AgriGold

A6544

65

17.4

8.2

3.4

Medium

Low

Med-Low

High

58.9

16.3

36.1

80.5

AgriGold

A6659

68

18.2

8.9

3.9

High

Med-High

Medium

Med-Low

59.7

14.7

37.7

83.1

Armor

1447

63

16.7

8.6

3.7

Medium

Low

Med-Low

Low

60.2

16.2

38.4

83.1

Croplan

5678

65

17.8

8.6

3.7

High

Med-Low

Medium

Medium

60.2

15.8

35.5

86.4

DEKALB

DKC67-44

65

17.3

8.9

3.7

High

Med-High

High

Med-High

60.0

16.0

36.3

79.2

DEKALB

DKC68-69

66

19.0

9.2

4.0

High

High

Medium

Med-High

60.4

16.1

33.1

85.6

DEKALB

DKC70-27

67

19.3

8.8

3.8

High

High

Medium

Med-High

59.5

16.7

33.8

88.1

Dyna-Gro

D54VC14

64

16.8

8.2

3.4

Medium

Low

Med-Low

Low

60.1

15.5

37.0

82.9

Dyna-Gro

D58VC65

64

17.6

8.6

3.8

High

Med-Low

Medium

Medium

60.2

15.6

34.8

86.2

Local Seed

LC1577

65

16.4

8.3

3.7

Medium

Low

Medium

Low

60.2

15.6

36.8

83.0

Mission

A1687

66

17.7

8.5

3.8

Med-High

Medium

Medium

Low

59.6

15.3

35.2

89.7

Pioneer

P1870

67

19.1

8.9

4.0

High

High

High

Med-High

59.5

16.8

38.2

75.0

Terral

24BHR99

66

17.9

8.7

3.8

Med-High

Med-Low

Medium

Med-High

59.0

15.6

34.7

82.1

Terral

26BHR30

65

18.0

8.9

3.9

Medium

Med-Low

High

High

60.4

17.3

38.9

76.6

Terral

28BHR18

68

19.4

9.2

4.0

Medium

Medium

Med-Low

High

59.2

17.4

38.7

78.4

 

Average

66

17.9

8.7

3.8

       

59.8

16.1

36.4

82.7


The information given here is for educational purposes only. References to commercial products, trade names, or suppliers are made with the understanding that no endorsement is implied and that no discrimination against other products or suppliers is intended.

Publication 3441 (POD-04-20)

By Erick Larson, PhD, Associate Extension/Research Professor, Plant and Soil Sciences.

Copyright 2020 by Mississippi State University. All rights reserved. This publication may be copied and distributed without alteration for nonprofit educational purposes provided that credit is given to the Mississippi State University Extension Service.

Produced by Agricultural Communications.

Mississippi State University is an equal opportunity institution. Discrimination in university employment, programs, or activities based on race, color, ethnicity, sex, pregnancy, religion, national origin, disability, age, sexual orientation, genetic information, status as a U.S. veteran, or any other status protected by applicable law is prohibited. Questions about equal opportunity programs or compliance should be directed to the Office of Compliance and Integrity, 56 Morgan Avenue, P.O. 6044, Mississippi State, MS 39762, (662) 325-5839.

Extension Service of Mississippi State University, cooperating with U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published in furtherance of Acts of Congress, May 8 and June 30, 1914. GARY B. JACKSON, Director

The Mississippi State University Extension Service is working to ensure all web content is accessible to all users. If you need assistance accessing any of our content, please email the webteam or call 662-325-2262.

Authors

Portrait of Dr. Erick J. Larson
Extension/Research Professor
Associate Agronomist/Specialist - Corn, Grain Sorghum and Small Grains

Your Extension Experts

Portrait of Dr. Christine E. Coker
Assoc Extension/Research Prof
Urban Horticulture Vegetables Green Roofs Food Systems
Portrait of Dr. Drew Miller Gholson
Assistant Professor
Portrait of Dr. Erick J. Larson
Extension/Research Professor
Associate Agronomist/Specialist - Corn, Grain Sorghum and Small Grains
Portrait of Dr. Rocky Lemus
Extension/Research Professor
Grazing Systems, hay production, forage fertility, forage quality and utilization, alfalfa productio