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Seed or Transplants

As with vegetables, there are advantages to setting out some plants as transplants and others from seed. Single-potted annual plants or packs of annuals containing several transplants are more expensive than seed. However, the instant effect created by setting out plants is irresistible to most gardeners.

Sowing seed directly into the garden soil is a time-honored ritual that rewards a little work and patience with great returns. The extra time involved is offset by savings in initial cost. Also, you can get more variety at less expense from seed than from transplants.

Many species of annual flowers have improved varieties, with increased heat tolerance, disease resistance, and other improvements. Instead of relying on the same tried and true varieties each year, look for those that have won the All-America Selection award. In addition to the dozens of varieties found on seed racks, mail-order companies provide gardeners with colorful catalogs full of many exciting annuals, including the newest varieties. Ordering seed through the mail has a peculiar excitement all its own, and the catalogs themselves are a wealth of information on planting and caring for unusual plants.

Annual flowers, whether grown from seed or transplants, are all handled the same in the garden. Summer annuals are planted in the early spring, after soil temperatures have risen and danger of frost has passed. Winter annuals are planted early enough in the fall to allow time for toughening up before frost.

Set plants shallow, with the top of the roots just under the surface of the soil. If transplants are grown in pots made of compressed peat moss, crumble the top edge of the peat pot away from the plant so that it will not act as a wick pulling water away from the roots. Pinching off small flowers on brand-new transplants may be hard to do, but it will promote fast new growth and more flowers sooner.

You can have continual bloom the entire summer through some occasional maintenance. As the flowers begin to fade, remove them before seeds are formed. The plants in turn generate new flowers to try again to produce seed. Annual beds maintained for cut flowers will also send up new flower stems to replace those removed for floral arrangements.

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Publications

Publication Number: IS0204
Publication Number: p3121
Publication Number: P3099
Publication Number: P3115

News

American beautyberry, a native shrub with tiny flowers and prolific berries, is excellent in home landscapes.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens October 16, 2017

After cleaning the mess from Hurricane Nate, I had the chance to participate in two outstanding field days in Mississippi and Louisiana. I really enjoyed the plantings at the LSU AgCenter Hammond Research Station and the Mississippi State University Truck Crops Branch Experiment Station in Crystal Springs.

These events inspired me to share ideas over the next several weeks for great plants to put in your garden and landscape that you will enjoy next fall.

 Several blue containers in this colorful landscape garden are blown over after heavy storm winds.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens October 9, 2017

While Hurricane Nate was obviously not in the same class as Katrina, the last hurricane to hit the Mississippi Gulf Coast, it did provide gardeners a lesson in getting their landscapes ready before a storm.

I know it’s a bit backwards to wait until after the storm to make a list of tips to get your garden ready ahead of time. But this was the first hurricane I’ve experienced since moving to the Gulf Coast, and I’ve been thinking what I could have done better in advance.

Filed Under: Flower Gardens, Landscape and Garden Design, Landscape Management, Environment October 6, 2017

Gardeners can purchase hard-to-find native plants during the Crosby Arboretum’s popular Fall Native Plant Sale.

The semiannual sale will be Oct. 21 and 22 at the arboretum. It begins at 10 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. Arboretum members can enter at 9 a.m. Admission is free.

Toucan Rose canna flowers in a garden landscape with shades of pink and dark red are brightened by sunlight.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens October 2, 2017

Cannas are commonly grown as large-specimen plants and look fantastic mass planted in landscapes. Their tropical-looking foliage lends bold texture to the space until the flowers steal the show from summer through fall.

In fact, the cannas I have planted in my Ocean Springs landscape right now are looking the best they have so far this year.

Backlit Gulf Muhly grass glows like a rich, pink cloud in this landscape.
Filed Under: Flower Gardens September 25, 2017

I know some homeowners who look at ornamental grasses and wonder what is the big deal; these plants are only grass. But when fall rolls around, many of these naysayers change their opinion 180 degrees.

Fall is a great time to appreciate ornamental grasses, as their flower plumes, actually called inflorescences, really pop out in their full glory.

One of the best and showier grasses is not a selection that was bred for any particular characteristic. I’m talking about Gulf Muhly grass, a Mississippi native grass that really struts its stuff in the fall and winter.

Watch

Killer Cool Color
Southern Gardening

Killer Cool Color

Sunday, October 15, 2017 - 2:00am
Copious Coleus Color
Southern Gardening

Copious Coleus Color

Sunday, September 24, 2017 - 1:00am
Roundabout Color
Southern Gardening

Roundabout Color

Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 1:00am
Burgandy and Silver
Southern Gardening

Burgandy and Silver

Sunday, September 10, 2017 - 1:00am
Landscape Gold
Southern Gardening

Landscape Gold

Sunday, September 3, 2017 - 1:00am

Listen

Monday, October 16, 2017 - 1:00am
Friday, October 13, 2017 - 1:00am
Thursday, October 12, 2017 - 1:00am
Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - 1:00am
Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - 1:00am

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