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Management tips for hurricane-damaged corn fields

Begin harvesting as quickly as possible. Harvest progress of lodged corn may be up to five times slower than normal, so growers should aggressively harvest mature corn, despite moisture content. Growers should take this action because the likelihood of grain quality deterioration and harvest losses are much higher than normal, and may increase substantially if wet weather is prevalent this fall. Field drying rates of severely lodged fields will be much slower, compared to normal (0.6% moisture per day), because aeration is reduced. Furthermore, as average daily temperatures begin to drop, field drying may virtually cease.

Operators must slow combine speed to a crawl in order to pick up and feed the tangled pile of fallen corn into the machine. Combine harvest is generally more efficient when traveling opposite the predominant direction the corn stalks are laying. For example, if the stalks are lying towards the west, drive the combine in the east direction. Soybean platform headers may actually work more efficiently than corn heads on nearly flattened corn (less than six inches above ground level).

Pre-harvest herbicide application may be necessary to kill morningglories or other weed species, which could hamper harvest considerably. The most effective herbicide treatment as a harvest aid for morningglory control is a combination of Gramoxone Max (1 pt/a. + NIS 0.25% v/v) and Sodium Chlorate (3 lbs/a). This herbicide combination needs to be applied at least 14 days prior to harvest (please check product labels for specific instructions).

Several types of aftermarket attachments to assist corn headers gather fallen corn are manufactured. These devices are designed to help pull lodged stalks along the snout into the feeder mechanism.

These include:

Kelderman Corn Reel
2686 Highway 92 East
Oskaloosa, IA 52577-9685
1-800-334-6150

Corn Saver
5200 N. Columbia St.
Plainview, TX 79072
800-536-1022

Meteer Manufacturing
RR1 Box 221
Athens, IL 62613
Phone (217) 636-8109

Minden Machine Shop Inc
1302 K Road
Minden, NE 68959
1-800-264-6587

Will Manufacturing
19642 X Road
Denison, KS 66419
Phone: 785-935-2304

Roll-A-Cone
Tulia, TX 79088
(806) 668-4722

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Two men move cases of bottled water in a storehouse.
Filed Under: Disaster Response September 15, 2017

STARKVILLE, Miss. – First responders and disaster experts know that good intentions can lay the foundations for disastrous conditions after hurricane winds and floods subside.

Through the Mississippi State University Extension Service, Anne Howard Hilbun conducts disaster response training for citizens and emergency workers. She is an instructor with the MSU Extension Center for Government and Community Development.

Flooded grain bins in Crowley, Louisiana, are among the many problems Louisiana producers are facing after historic flooding caused more than $100 million in damage to the state’s agriculture. Mississippi State University Extension Service personnel have worked with state hay growers to send forage to producers in Louisiana affected by flooding earlier this month. (Photo by Louisiana State University AgCenter Communications/Bruce Schultz)
Filed Under: Disaster Response August 30, 2016

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- After nearly 3 feet of rain in two days caused historic flooding and widespread damage in Louisiana and southwest Mississippi earlier this month, volunteers from Mississippi State University are assisting in relief efforts.

Winston County Extension agent Mike Skipper, left, discusses recovery issues from the April 2014 tornado with Rusty Suttle of Louisville at an Agricultural Disaster Resource Center set up May 15, 2014. (File photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
Filed Under: Disaster Response August 28, 2015

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Mississippi State University leaders realized the importance of instituting a standardized response system to assist with all types of catastrophes that might strike the state.

Six months after Katrina, the MSU Extension Service Center for Government and Community Development began training university employees, as well as local emergency management officials, 911-call-center operators, and elected and appointed officials.

Hurricane Katrina displaced both family pets and large animals. (MSU Ag Communications file photo/Jim Lytle)
Filed Under: Animal Health, Disaster Response August 28, 2015

STARKVILLE, Miss. -- In the hours immediately following Hurricane Katrina’s landfall, a team of Mississippi State University veterinarians specially trained to work with animals in disaster situations arrived at the state’s designated animal disaster relief shelter in Jackson.

While the Mississippi Animal Response Team’s immediate focus was to assist the Mississippi Board of Animal Health with assessing and managing the growing number of displaced animals, they also had other duties.

Winston County farmer Willie Lee Jr. discusses his losses from the April 28 tornado with Mississippi State University Extension Service disaster assessment team members Brandi Karisch (center) and Jane Parish, both of MSU's Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences. (Photo by MSU Ag Communications/Linda Breazeale)
Filed Under: Agriculture, Disaster Response May 20, 2014

LOUISVILLE -- Disaster assessment teams with the Mississippi State University Extension Service are providing “boots on the ground” as agricultural landowners begin the process of recovering from the April 28 storms.

“These trained teams can assess immediate and long-term needs,” said Elmo Collum, a disaster response coordinator with the MSU Extension Service. “They may discover issues that need to be addressed immediately, such as an injured animal, or they may see things that will take weeks of effort, such as fence repair.”

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